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Thread: আসুন বাংলায় আলোচনা করি

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kart View Post
    Bollywood singers are pretty good at it...They pronounce words like Khuda properly (I'm guessing?)
    Yep a lot of them do, especially the more renowned ones.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MonkeyDLuffy View Post
    I associate that with UP/Bihar than Bengal.
    It is all over the north, including Bangal. Bang itself in Sanskrit would be Vang.
    Similarly in Sanskrit Bedi would be Vedi (also Sikh would be Shishya).
    Last edited by parasar; 07-15-2019 at 04:33 PM.

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  5. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by MonkeyDLuffy View Post
    Like kisan to kisanva, ramesh to rameshva. Probably part of Bhojpuri. Parasar can chip in and enlighten more.
    Yes that suffix intonation is quite common!
    For example baccha (child) in UP could be called bacchwa and in Bihar bauwa.

  6. #34
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    Nepali also has many instances of v->b verbal, but not in written/literature or even formal(TV/politician) Nepali.

    is pronounced va (labiodental v).
    is pronounced ba (bilabial b).
    is pronounced wa .

    ps -- I'm becoming a wiki-expert in basic linguistics.

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    I’ve heard some Hindi speakers pronounce water as bater. Does English wa becomes ba in Hindi?

  9. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by poi View Post
    Nepali also has many instances of v->b verbal, but not in written/literature or even formal(TV/politician) Nepali.

    is pronounced va (labiodental v).
    is pronounced ba (bilabial b).
    is pronounced wa .

    ps -- I'm becoming a wiki-expert in basic linguistics.
    Interesting, in Bengali its the opposite. Standard Bengali doesn't have 'v' sound at all. Only b and bh. Certain dialects on the other hand do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pnb123 View Post
    I’ve heard some Hindi speakers pronounce water as bater. Does English wa becomes ba in Hindi?
    From my experience, Hindi speakers (and Indians in general) pronounce "Water" as Vater and "Venture" as Wenture. Basically, w->v and v->w.

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  13. #38
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    Question for Bengali speakers -- do you guys pronounce hard "sh" or just pronounce it "s" ?
    Nepali speakers have the most terrible time pronouncing hard "sh" and pronouncing variations of "s", despite the written script having multiple consonants.

    I still can't go through this "s" tongue twister:

    She sells seashells by the seashore.
    The shells she sells are surely seashells.
    So if she sells shells on the seashore,
    I'm sure she sells seashore shells.


    It is natural for me to pronounce it as:

    See sells seasells by the seasore
    the sells see sells are surely seasells...

    Hard sh was one of the most difficult things to learn.

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  15. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by poi View Post
    Question for Bengali speakers -- do you guys pronounce hard "sh" or just pronounce it "s" ?
    Nepali speakers have the most terrible time pronouncing hard "sh" and pronouncing variations of "s", despite the written script having multiple consonants.

    I still can't go through this "s" tongue twister:

    She sells seashells by the seashore.
    The shells she sells are surely seashells.
    So if she sells shells on the seashore,
    I'm sure she sells seashore shells.


    It is natural for me to pronounce it as:

    See sells seasells by the seasore
    the sells see sells are surely seasells...

    Hard sh was one of the most difficult things to learn.
    Most standard Bengali words use the sh sound, like shap (snake), while ones with normal s like rasta (road) are rarer. However, majority of dialects still use the s sound extensively, but sh still predominates.

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  17. #40
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    In Bangla it's the opposite.

    S becomes Sh in nearly all Indic derived words. So 'shap' for snake, 'shat' for seven, 'shikho' for learn, 'shuno' for listen.

    Perso Arabic terms starting with S tend to usually keep the sound, especially so in the Eastern dialects. So 'salam' for peace, 'sowal' for question, 'sehri' for the pre dawn meal during fasting. Not always the case though... 'shaheb' for sahib /sir /mister, 'shalwar' for salwar.

    In many Eastern dialects, the 'chh' and often the 'ch' will be pronounced like a 's'. So 'sabi' for keys, 'sand' for moon etc.

    In Sylheti, we go to another extreme and turn the 'sh' derived from 's' to an 'h' which is probably what makes the dialect so unintelligible. 'hikho', 'huno', 'hukhna'.

    There are loads of other sound shifts in the Eastern bengali dialects eg Sylheti.

    J to Z. (zao for go)
    P to F. (fani for water)
    K to Kh (fricative) - (khoro for do)
    H to '. (aat).
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