Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: Family Tree Maker for Writing a Family History Book

  1. #1
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    12,525
    Sex
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Ethnicity
    British and Irish
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-DF41>FGC36981
    mtDNA (M)
    U5a2c3a
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-DF27>DF83
    mtDNA (P)
    K1a1a

    Wales Ireland Scotland France Bretagne England Switzerland

    Question Family Tree Maker for Writing a Family History Book

    Has anyone used it for that purpose? Any good?

    I am probably going to start putting together a family history book very soon. Mostly it will be an update, with the addition of a lot of genetic testing results and some old family photos, of the excellent book completed in 1945 by a great grandaunt of mine and then updated in 1973 by a 1st cousin 2x removed. It will probably take me at least 2-5 years to finish.

    I've been waiting for the BIG breakthrough on my y-dna line before doing the book, but I'm starting to think maybe I should just go ahead and do it, or the book might never get done.
    Last edited by rms2; 08-12-2018 at 07:44 PM. Reason: Fixed some awkward wording.
     


    Y-DNA: R1b-L21> DF13> Z39589> DF41> FGC5572> BY168> BY166> FT37605> FGC36974> FGC36982> FGC36981

    Additional Data:
    Lactase Persistent:
    rs4988235 AA (13910 TT)
    rs182549 TT (22018 AA)

    Red Hair Carrier:
    Arg160Trp+ (rs1805008 T) aka R160W

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to rms2 For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (08-12-2018),  Guero (06-09-2019),  JMcB (03-25-2019),  JonikW (08-12-2018),  MikeWhalen (08-16-2018)

  3. #2
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    12,525
    Sex
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Ethnicity
    British and Irish
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-DF41>FGC36981
    mtDNA (M)
    U5a2c3a
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-DF27>DF83
    mtDNA (P)
    K1a1a

    Wales Ireland Scotland France Bretagne England Switzerland
    This is a good time to start working on a family history book, since I am starting to find Anthrogenica kind of boring. It's not the site's fault; there's just not much of interest to me going on.
     


    Y-DNA: R1b-L21> DF13> Z39589> DF41> FGC5572> BY168> BY166> FT37605> FGC36974> FGC36982> FGC36981

    Additional Data:
    Lactase Persistent:
    rs4988235 AA (13910 TT)
    rs182549 TT (22018 AA)

    Red Hair Carrier:
    Arg160Trp+ (rs1805008 T) aka R160W

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to rms2 For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (08-12-2018),  JonikW (08-12-2018)

  5. #3
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    1,854
    Sex
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois
    Ethnicity
    mixed European
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    Dad: R1b/L21/DF63
    mtDNA (M)
    K2b2
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-M269
    mtDNA (P)
    K2b1a1a

    United States of America England Wales Sweden Germany
    Might as well start it, you can always add in the big break-through when it comes, as the writing will take time!

    I haven't used that program so nothing of use to contribute. FTM was my first genealogy software, but that was a long time ago. Haven't used it for years for any purpose and lost everything I had on it when that computer died, which is annoying, but it's also probably good I've been forced to redo things. Anyway, excited to see someone posting in this Genealogy Apps section, as I've been thinking of starting a thread on GenomeMatePro.

    Personally, I need to pick a project to focus on instead of bouncing around, so I admire your focus. (On the other hand I'm new enough that catching up on old threads can be pretty interesting still. Finally managed to read through the whole Oldest Steppe Bell Beaker one.)

  6. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to msmarjoribanks For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (08-12-2018),  JMcB (03-25-2019),  JonikW (08-12-2018),  rms2 (08-12-2018)

  7. #4
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    1,544
    Sex
    Location
    Kent
    Ethnicity
    Isles Celto-Germanic
    Nationality
    British
    Y-DNA (P)
    I1 Z140+ A21912+
    mtDNA (M)
    V
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b L21+ L371+
    mtDNA (P)
    J1c2l

    Wales England Cornwall Scotland Ireland Normandie
    I'd like to do the same. Sadly though, I'm almost the only one in my family with an interest. We have family portraits on one line going back hundreds of years; on others we were farm labourers, miners etc. I think I'm the only one who still remembers first hand stories from my grandparents born in the early 20th century. They include things like what my grandfather told me of his first day down the mine in Cwmbran at the age of 14 (I still remember how much coal he loaded that day) and my grandmother on the other side telling me of her grandfather speaking Welsh to a Breton onion seller and their mutual understanding. I think I'm the only person alive who remembers that stuff because I loved listening to my elders. Perhaps I'll devote my impoverished retirement to it when it comes.
    Living DNA's former Cautious mode:
    Wales-related ancestry: 86.8%
    Cornwall: 8%
    North England-related ancestry: 5.2%
    Y line: Peak District, England. Big Y match: Scania, Sweden; TMRCA 1,280 ybp (YFull);
    mtDNA: traces to Glamorgan, Wales
    Mother's Y: traces to Llanvair Discoed, Wales

  8. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to JonikW For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (08-12-2018),  C J Wyatt III (08-12-2018),  gstockman (08-13-2018),  JMcB (08-13-2018),  Judith (03-24-2019),  msmarjoribanks (08-12-2018),  rms2 (08-12-2018)

  9. #5
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    12,525
    Sex
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Ethnicity
    British and Irish
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-DF41>FGC36981
    mtDNA (M)
    U5a2c3a
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-DF27>DF83
    mtDNA (P)
    K1a1a

    Wales Ireland Scotland France Bretagne England Switzerland
    I got a lot of oral history from my maternal grandmother. I wish I had been more methodical in my questions and had written things down, but I was just a kid.
     


    Y-DNA: R1b-L21> DF13> Z39589> DF41> FGC5572> BY168> BY166> FT37605> FGC36974> FGC36982> FGC36981

    Additional Data:
    Lactase Persistent:
    rs4988235 AA (13910 TT)
    rs182549 TT (22018 AA)

    Red Hair Carrier:
    Arg160Trp+ (rs1805008 T) aka R160W

  10. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to rms2 For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (08-12-2018),  JMcB (08-13-2018),  JonikW (08-12-2018),  msmarjoribanks (08-12-2018)

  11. #6
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    1,544
    Sex
    Location
    Kent
    Ethnicity
    Isles Celto-Germanic
    Nationality
    British
    Y-DNA (P)
    I1 Z140+ A21912+
    mtDNA (M)
    V
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b L21+ L371+
    mtDNA (P)
    J1c2l

    Wales England Cornwall Scotland Ireland Normandie
    Quote Originally Posted by rms2 View Post
    I got a lot of oral history from my maternal grandmother. I wish I had been more methodical in my questions and had written things down, but I was just a kid.
    Same here. We came across some autobiographical notes written by my great grandmother recently, who I knew as a small child in the 70s when she was in her nineties. She describes seeing Queen Victoria in London, and the Empress of India being an unremarkable, small fat woman. She made a lot of interesting observations that I'll have to add to the archive. It's good that she had the foresight to describe her childhood with addresses where they lived and other details. I've visited some of the sites as a result.
    Living DNA's former Cautious mode:
    Wales-related ancestry: 86.8%
    Cornwall: 8%
    North England-related ancestry: 5.2%
    Y line: Peak District, England. Big Y match: Scania, Sweden; TMRCA 1,280 ybp (YFull);
    mtDNA: traces to Glamorgan, Wales
    Mother's Y: traces to Llanvair Discoed, Wales

  12. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to JonikW For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (08-12-2018),  JMcB (08-13-2018),  msmarjoribanks (08-13-2018),  rms2 (08-12-2018)

  13. #7
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    1,854
    Sex
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois
    Ethnicity
    mixed European
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    Dad: R1b/L21/DF63
    mtDNA (M)
    K2b2
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-M269
    mtDNA (P)
    K2b1a1a

    United States of America England Wales Sweden Germany
    I wish I'd cared more about family history stuff when my grandparents were alive. With my dad's parents there wasn't an opportunity -- they died when I was very young and his father was estranged from his family anyway, and I inherited a lot of work later on from my dad's older cousin who grew up in the area where his mother was from. My mother's mother was into it, and I've been able to go through some of her papers but she died when I was in college. My mother spent a lot of time going through old family photos and labeling them after she retired and I was surprised at how much there was.

    There's not a lot of letters or reminiscences immediately in my family, but I've been able to come across some that others have that are fascinating -- although I'd have to ask for permission to use them if I ever got around to doing anything. One is a letter from my gg grandfather Frank who immigrated from England to the US around 1871, when he was 21. He grew up in a pretty well-off, urban environment near London, and then moved to the middle of nowhere and the letter is one he wrote to his sister back home when snowed in in a cabin in Wyoming Territory. It just seems like such a shocking change.

    A distant cousin on that side has a lot of letters from one of that family's in-laws (Frank's mother's uncle). The reference to Queen Victoria made me think of them, since there's one about her coronation:

    "The coronation of our young Queen was celebrated by us in high style. The day was ushered in by the roar of cannon – this roused our young Townsmen about 3 in the morning when they were all on the alert to decorate the arches which were around the town. The most chaste and elegant was one from Mr Suggates to Mr Beales. Mr Crabtree’s house was also beautifully ornamented with flowers, you know it is quite of the cottage order, the windows roof and porch were all decorated wh. with its rustic style gave it to my idea the appearance of a Swiss dwelling. Standing on that angle of the street and looking through Mr Suggates arch to Mr Easterson’s house, which was after the same manner, the effect was really beautiful. The Town from one end to the other was a continuation of garlands and devices of various kinds. The preparations began over night and several travelling gents said they had seen no other to equal it anywhere around. The weather you know was rather unsettled, this made us a little anxious, as the poor were all to be regaled by a dinner of cold roast beef and hot plum pudding. They were to dine in the Street to the number of 1,200, 28 persons to each table with a President and Vice-President. They extended from the Sun Inn to Mr Athill’s house, it was a pretty sight. The utmost order prevailed, some of the tables adorned with flowers, with the Presidents & vice chairs according to the taste of their ladies. I hope I shall in your next parcel to be able to put in a paper which will give you some idea of the pains taken to pursue peace & quiet and the harmony that prevailed certainly recompensed the gentlemen for their previous trouble. After dinner such as chose were to repair to the gravel pit to finish the day with rustic sports and thousands I suppose did so, but here the rain sadly annoyed them. However, they jumped in sacks (illegible) notwithstanding the pelting drops...."

    There's a bit in the letter about one of the daughters on our side of the family that sounds it could be in a novel of the period:

    "You say “I mean to write to Sarah Reeve as soon as I can” – why write to Sarah? I do not say you have deceived her, but I do think you have trifled with her feelings more than you ought to have done. Therefore I would choose any one of the family as a correspondent rather than her. She is an amiable girl and would like very much to go out as governess – prudently reflecting that so many girls at home is unnecessary. I should like so much to hear of a comfortable situation for her. Sophia is a member of Mr Craig’s church. I think there is great firmness in her character, yet there are eccentricities wh. it were well did not exist – she would like to be a recluse in my opinion. She never wishes to join any party nor does she unless obliged. In the family she is but little seen, her engagement in interesting her sister occupies much of her time and what she has to spare is devoted to reading. She rises very early and devotes the chief of her pocket money to religious purposes, so there is strong principles at bottom I hope, but this line of conduct does not clothe her profession in a lovely garb."

  14. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to msmarjoribanks For This Useful Post:

     C J Wyatt III (08-13-2018),  JMcB (08-13-2018),  JonikW (08-13-2018),  MikeWhalen (08-16-2018),  rms2 (08-13-2018)

  15. #8
    Registered Users
    Posts
    296
    Sex
    Location
    USA
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-L21 L513*

    United States of America Ireland Germany Belgium Wallonia
    I looked at FTM when I did my own family history book in 2011, so admittedly that was eons ago, but at least at the time the book-making options were pretty crude - it was more the ability to organize and print family group sheets along with pictures in sort of a scrapbook output format, and I had already done that myself manually. For distributing to my family, I wanted to make a more polished narrative interspersed with pictures, more like a real book.

    I finally went with a self-publishing site called Blurb (http://www.blurb.com) which allowed me a lot more creative control over the output. The end result in PDF form is here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B1...XdpQ3pfT1NVYlU which you’re welcome to not because it’s what I think you should do but only if it gives you ideas for organizing your own.

    In 2011 I didn’t have any genetic genealogy information that mattered within the last 250 years so I didn’t include it in my immediate family history book, but I did a two-part book series and the first volume was the legends and facts around the origins of my family surname. In that first book I did include what little I knew in 2011 about our origins through DNA; mainly just being L21 and the prehistoric background.

    Of course when I distributed copies to my family apart from a few “cool, thanks” responses what I mostly got was “you must be wrong because the family stories I was told are completely different.” Ah well. :-).

  16. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Dave-V For This Useful Post:

     gstockman (08-13-2018),  JMcB (08-13-2018),  MikeWhalen (08-16-2018),  msmarjoribanks (08-13-2018),  rms2 (08-13-2018)

  17. #9
    Registered Users
    Posts
    604
    Sex
    Location
    Texas
    Ethnicity
    English, Irish, German
    Nationality
    US
    Y-DNA (P)
    L21>L226>FGC5639

    England Germany Netherlands France Ireland Switzerland
    My experience was the same as Dave's. All the genealogy generated books just lack the needed flexibility and end up looking like computer generated books. Here are the issues that I found: 1) indexing with flexibility is not there (I wanted to add birth year and residence to name index); 2) interjection of narrative for major sketches showing your logic for proof looked just inserted; 3) references usually are lacking in flexibility; 4) Inserting photographs and key source documents are difficult and captions for photographs hard to accomplish; 5) introductory sections require some special treatment; 6) printers now require Adobe PDF for input for any kind of higher quality book or print on demand book; 7) no flexibility to combine families into a single sketch - waste 20 to 40 % of space which just increases the number of pages and costs.

    I used Ventura Publisher (now probably hard to find now). I compiled nine 600 page books (four in paper form):

    http://www.rcasey.net/acrstrt2.htm

    I was able to publish around 60,000 individuals in the nine books. I could also combine into one huge publication with a master index and also generate HTML versions. But you have printing cost issues that nobody can avoid. If you print 50 to 100 copies, print on demand is the only economical choice. If you print 200 or more books, you have the option for a much higher quality book (Smythe sewn, 32 page signatures that are folded and sewn together (much more durable), cloth bound hardback books and better choice of papers to make photos look the best but not too shiny that text looks funny. My first two books were 8 1/2 x 11 inch which creates a lot of white space (more costs). The last two books were 6 x 9 and looked much better. Print on demand is perfect bound - cut pages roughed up and then glue to the thick paper binder. My third book was 864 pages 6 x 9 inch, the first 100 copies were around $40 per copy, extra copies were only $7 each which makes you buy too many. With print on demand - you only get a five percent discount going from 100 to 200 copies. Both now require electronic PDF copies which FTM can not produce - major issue. Printers now charge a premium of paper ready copy which just scanned which can have issues for lower end printing options. Major printers (with the lowest costs) will not accept anything but PDF input (with images included).
    Last edited by RobertCasey; 08-13-2018 at 06:31 AM.

  18. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to RobertCasey For This Useful Post:

     Dave-V (08-13-2018),  JMcB (03-25-2019),  JonikW (08-13-2018),  msmarjoribanks (08-13-2018),  rms2 (08-13-2018)

  19. #10
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    12,525
    Sex
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Ethnicity
    British and Irish
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-DF41>FGC36981
    mtDNA (M)
    U5a2c3a
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-DF27>DF83
    mtDNA (P)
    K1a1a

    Wales Ireland Scotland France Bretagne England Switzerland
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave-V View Post
    I looked at FTM when I did my own family history book in 2011, so admittedly that was eons ago, but at least at the time the book-making options were pretty crude - it was more the ability to organize and print family group sheets along with pictures in sort of a scrapbook output format, and I had already done that myself manually. For distributing to my family, I wanted to make a more polished narrative interspersed with pictures, more like a real book.

    I finally went with a self-publishing site called Blurb (http://www.blurb.com) which allowed me a lot more creative control over the output. The end result in PDF form is here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B1...XdpQ3pfT1NVYlU which you’re welcome to not because it’s what I think you should do but only if it gives you ideas for organizing your own.

    In 2011 I didn’t have any genetic genealogy information that mattered within the last 250 years so I didn’t include it in my immediate family history book, but I did a two-part book series and the first volume was the legends and facts around the origins of my family surname. In that first book I did include what little I knew in 2011 about our origins through DNA; mainly just being L21 and the prehistoric background.

    Of course when I distributed copies to my family apart from a few “cool, thanks” responses what I mostly got was “you must be wrong because the family stories I was told are completely different.” Ah well. :-).
    Whoa! Nice!
     


    Y-DNA: R1b-L21> DF13> Z39589> DF41> FGC5572> BY168> BY166> FT37605> FGC36974> FGC36982> FGC36981

    Additional Data:
    Lactase Persistent:
    rs4988235 AA (13910 TT)
    rs182549 TT (22018 AA)

    Red Hair Carrier:
    Arg160Trp+ (rs1805008 T) aka R160W

  20. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to rms2 For This Useful Post:

     Dave-V (08-13-2018),  gstockman (08-13-2018),  JMcB (03-25-2019)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Family Tree Generator?
    By Aha in forum Genealogy
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-22-2019, 03:20 AM
  2. Genealogy Family Tree vs. Genetic Family Tree
    By Wing Genealogist in forum Other
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-28-2017, 11:06 PM
  3. Family tree
    By SWAHILLI_PRINCE16 in forum AncestryDNA
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-02-2016, 06:58 PM
  4. A Māori family tree
    By BalkanKiwi in forum Genealogy
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 06-17-2016, 01:54 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-03-2016, 04:29 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •