Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Surnames in the US Census of 1790, An Analysis of National Origins of the Population

  1. #1
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    5,521
    Sex
    Location
    Laurentia
    Ethnicity
    North Sealandic
    Nationality
    AMCIT
    aDNA Match (1st)
    GRO010 Groningen, Netherlands 0.0199
    aDNA Match (2nd)
    HAD009 Cambridgeshire 0.0205
    aDNA Match (3rd)
    SWG008 Schleswig-Holstein 0.0213
    Y-DNA (P)
    U152>See signature
    mtDNA (M)
    H1bt
    Y-DNA (M)
    I2a2a1b2a1b1>Y4925
    mtDNA (P)
    H37

    England Scotland Wales Germany Palatinate Ireland Leinster Sweden Finns

    Surnames in the US Census of 1790, An Analysis of National Origins of the Population

    I bought an online version of the book

    Surnames in the US Census of 1790, An Analysis of National Origins of the Population
    American Council of Learned Societies. Committee on Linguistic and National Stocks in the Population of the United States
    Genealogical Publishing Com, 1969 - Reference - 335 pages
    0 Reviews

    This work lists and classifies thousands of surnames according to the several states in which they were found in 1790, thus enabling researchers to narrow their search to a particular area. English, Scottish, Celtic Irish, Ulster Irish, German, Dutch, French, and Swedish names predominate.
    It's a very good reference for anyone interested in this type of research.

    I've been using it in an effort to discover which areas of England were under/over represented in the American 13 colonies. The analysis is very detailed and thorough.

    Another similar book but solely focused on Great Britain is :

    Homes of Family Names in Great Britain
    By Henry Brougham Guppy
    It is free here https://books.google.com/books/about...page&q&f=false

    I may post some of my findings in this thread later, but so far I can say from the Surnames in the US Census of 1790, An Analysis of National Origins of the Population and some analysis of my own; that Wales, and most of Western England appear to be under represented in the American Colonies, while most of Eastern England appears to over represented. Meaning more of the American colonists were from Eastern England than from Wales and Western England.
    Last edited by MitchellSince1893; 09-10-2018 at 03:20 AM.

  2. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to MitchellSince1893 For This Useful Post:

     Baltimore1937 (09-12-2018),  chelle (09-10-2018),  JMcB (09-11-2018),  leonardo (09-10-2018),  MikeWhalen (09-10-2018),  msmarjoribanks (09-11-2018),  PLogan (09-10-2018),  spruithean (09-10-2018),  Webb (09-10-2018)

  3. #2
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    5,521
    Sex
    Location
    Laurentia
    Ethnicity
    North Sealandic
    Nationality
    AMCIT
    aDNA Match (1st)
    GRO010 Groningen, Netherlands 0.0199
    aDNA Match (2nd)
    HAD009 Cambridgeshire 0.0205
    aDNA Match (3rd)
    SWG008 Schleswig-Holstein 0.0213
    Y-DNA (P)
    U152>See signature
    mtDNA (M)
    H1bt
    Y-DNA (M)
    I2a2a1b2a1b1>Y4925
    mtDNA (P)
    H37

    England Scotland Wales Germany Palatinate Ireland Leinster Sweden Finns
    Quote Originally Posted by MitchellSince1893 View Post
    I bought an online version of the book

    Surnames in the US Census of 1790, An Analysis of National Origins of the Population
    American Council of Learned Societies. Committee on Linguistic and National Stocks in the Population of the United States
    Genealogical Publishing Com, 1969 - Reference - 335 pages
    0 Reviews



    It's a very good reference for anyone interested in this type of research.
    Here is a list of the content

    Report of Committee on linguistic and national stocks in the population of the United States --
    ANNEX A : --
    National stocks in the population of the United States as indicated by surnames in the census of 1790, by Howard F. Barker --
    ch. 1. The population of the United States in 1790 --
    ch. 2. Intrepretation of the currency of names --
    ch. 3. Evidence of English contributions to 1790 America --
    ch. 4. Contribution of Scots to 1790 America --
    ch. 5. Contributions of the Celtic Irish to 1790 America --
    ch. 6. The Irish contribution, particularly that of Ulster --
    ch. 7. German contributions to 1790 --
    ch. 8. Summary of contributions of national stocks to 1790 America --
    Appendix 1. : --
    Excerpts from studies in Pennsylvania German family names, by Oscar Kuhns (Americana Germanica, 1902) --
    Appendix 2. : --
    Names of moderately common use by foreighners taking the oath of Allegience to the province or state of Pennsylvania, 1727-1808 --
    Appendix 3. : --
    German name forms, original and American --
    Annex B . : --
    The minor stocks in the American population of 1790, by Marcus L. Hansen --
    ch. 1. Introduction --
    ch. 2. The Dutch --
    ch. 3. The French --
    ch. 4. The Swedes --
    Annex C. : --
    The population of the American outlying regions in 1790, by Marcus L. Hansen..

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MitchellSince1893 For This Useful Post:

     JMcB (09-11-2018),  msmarjoribanks (09-11-2018)

Similar Threads

  1. Origins of Q1b1a in the Jewish Population
    By Táltos in forum Jewish
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 06-04-2019, 04:40 PM
  2. My Average cM Population by IBD Analysis
    By zuzu14 in forum Autosomal (auDNA)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-20-2019, 10:59 PM
  3. Replies: 24
    Last Post: 09-03-2016, 08:31 AM
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-29-2014, 03:45 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-06-2013, 12:52 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •