Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 91011
Results 101 to 108 of 108

Thread: Cassidy's Thesis - Implications for L21, DF27 etc.

  1. #101
    Registered Users
    Posts
    136
    Sex
    Location
    Scotland
    Ethnicity
    English
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-FGC53506
    mtDNA (M)
    H2a1

    England North of England Cornwall
    Quote Originally Posted by ADW_1981 View Post
    No YDNA results that I can see, but I could have missed it. Predominantly brown eyed and brown/black haired with derived mutations for both common light skin variations. So nothing much new.
    So the men all looked like George Best, George Clooney, Mel Gibson and Roy Keane, and the women like Sinead O'Connor and the Corrs? OK, I can live with that.

  2. #102
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,221
    Sex
    Location
    Amsterdam, Dublin
    Ethnicity
    European
    Nationality
    Irish
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-L21-DF21-S5456
    mtDNA (M)
    H1C1

    Ireland European Union
    This is a presentation I gave this week which outlines the evolution of Genetic Genealogy in Ireland but also deals with Indo European, Steppe, Bell Beaker and Celtic Migrations.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=...&v=P327fMOt0lo
    Last edited by Heber; 06-14-2019 at 12:43 PM.
    Gerard Corcoran
    R1b-DF21-S5456-S6166, H1C1

  3. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Heber For This Useful Post:

     JonikW (06-14-2019),  Judith (06-18-2019),  MitchellSince1893 (06-14-2019),  R.Rocca (06-14-2019),  razyn (06-14-2019),  rms2 (06-15-2019)

  4. #103
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,221
    Sex
    Location
    Amsterdam, Dublin
    Ethnicity
    European
    Nationality
    Irish
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-L21-DF21-S5456
    mtDNA (M)
    H1C1

    Ireland European Union
    Posted in Genetic Genealogy and Ancient DNA in the News
    Last edited by Heber; 06-14-2019 at 01:33 PM.
    Gerard Corcoran
    R1b-DF21-S5456-S6166, H1C1

  5. #104
    Banned
    Posts
    30
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    CELTIBERIAN
    Nationality
    SPANIARD
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-DF27/Z195/DF17
    mtDNA (M)
    H1J

    Spain
    Quote Originally Posted by Heber View Post
    Posted in Genetic Genealogy and Ancient DNA in the News
    Hi There,

    I'm R1B/M269/P312/DF27/Z195/DF17 CTS7768 from Spain. I understand that DF17 is a branch of Z195 with origins in Catalonia area in NE Spain although not yet proven. Since there have been other Z195/DF17 found all over Europe but with focal dispersion from Spain northward. could this imply that perhaps the celtic and preceltic migrations were actually northward and not the other way around? in other words, could the pre celtic waves have come from Tartessos/atlantic fringe in lieu of central europe? please note that there have been beaker vases in balearic islands older than the central europe ones...thanks

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to jaumemiquel For This Useful Post:

     Heber (06-15-2019)

  7. #105
    Registered Users
    Posts
    3,452
    Sex
    Location
    Tierra de Ayllon
    Nationality
    Vespuccian
    Y-DNA (P)
    U152>L2>Z49>Z142>
    mtDNA (M)
    H1
    Y-DNA (M)
    I2a2a1b2a1b1>Y4925
    mtDNA (P)
    H37

    England Scotland Wales Germany Northern Ireland Ireland
    Quote Originally Posted by Heber View Post
    This is a presentation I gave this week which outlines the evolution of Genetic Genealogy in Ireland but also deals with Indo European, Steppe, Bell Beaker and Celtic Migrations.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=...&v=P327fMOt0lo
    I'm flattered that you included some of my maps of England in your presentation ~5:30 mark.
    Y-DNA R-Z49>Z142>Z12222>FGC12378>FGC12401>FGC12384
    Ancestry: 37% English, 26% Scot/Ulster Scot, 14% Welsh, 14% German 3% Ireland, 3% Nordic, 2% French & Dutch, 1% India

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MitchellSince1893 For This Useful Post:

     Heber (06-15-2019),  JonikW (06-14-2019)

  9. #106
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,221
    Sex
    Location
    Amsterdam, Dublin
    Ethnicity
    European
    Nationality
    Irish
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-L21-DF21-S5456
    mtDNA (M)
    H1C1

    Ireland European Union
    Quote Originally Posted by jaumemiquel View Post
    Hi There,

    I'm R1B/M269/P312/DF27/Z195/DF17 CTS7768 from Spain. I understand that DF17 is a branch of Z195 with origins in Catalonia area in NE Spain although not yet proven. Since there have been other Z195/DF17 found all over Europe but with focal dispersion from Spain northward. could this imply that perhaps the celtic and preceltic migrations were actually northward and not the other way around? in other words, could the pre celtic waves have come from Tartessos/atlantic fringe in lieu of central europe? please note that there have been beaker vases in balearic islands older than the central europe ones...thanks
    You can read about John Koch theory on Celtic from the West, Atlantic Europe in the Metal Ages, Phoeniciens in the West, Exploring Celtic Origins here:

    https://ifc.dpz.es/recursos/publicac.../54/26koch.pdf

    https://www.academia.edu/19895000/Celtic_from_the_West

    https://www.academia.edu/38388603/Ce...hared_language

    https://www.academia.edu/14176791/Ph...d_Proto-Celtic

    https://www.academia.edu/38404442/Ex...s_and_genetics
    Gerard Corcoran
    R1b-DF21-S5456-S6166, H1C1

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Heber For This Useful Post:

     Phoebe Watts (06-15-2019),  Tomenable (06-20-2019)

  11. #107
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,221
    Sex
    Location
    Amsterdam, Dublin
    Ethnicity
    European
    Nationality
    Irish
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-L21-DF21-S5456
    mtDNA (M)
    H1C1

    Ireland European Union
    Public lecture on the Ranelagh Osteoarchaeology Project: the 'forgotten graveyard'

    http://www.tii.ie/news/archaeology/r...eoarchaeology/

    A large, previously unrecorded, archaeological site was discovered hidden beneath the grass in Ranelagh townland (Roscommon) during archaeological investigations carried out before the construction of the N61 Coolteige Road Project. Over 54 weeks of excavation of the site was undertaken by Excavation Director Shane Delaney and his team from Irish Archaeological Consultancy Ltd, on behalf of Roscommon County Council and TII.

    They discovered that the site was in use for over 500 years, initially as a large settlement and farm enclosed by a protective bank and ditch. The artefacts discovered were typical of those from the sixth–11th century AD. They include personal items such as combs made of antler, dress accessories and jewellery, and iron knives, but also special artefacts for fine dining. Post-excavation specialist analyses are ongoing. (Peak occupation 750 AD).

    The most extraordinary discovery was, however, that the settlement had developed into a cemetery with over 1,000 human burials—long since forgotten. The subject of Professor Murphy’s talk is the scientific study of those human skeletal remains, which are being analysed under the ‘Ranelagh Osteoarchaeology Project’ based in QUB. Post-excavation analysis has focused on a detailed osteoarchaeological examination of all human skeletal remains alongside a comprehensive programme of radiocarbon dating that will facilitate a thorough understanding of the development and lifespan of the burial ground.

    A targeted programme of ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis is determining the genetic composition of particular individuals and investigating issues of familial relatedness, disease, and the potential presence of non-local people in the cemetery. The aDNA work is being carried out in collaboration with Professor Dan Bradley of Trinity College Dublin. Further collaboration involves stable isotope research undertaken by Dr Julia Beaumont of the University of Bradford. This research is exploring issues related to diet and migration, as well as maternal and infant health.

    The involvement of the University sector in the project has the added benefit of enabling smaller spin-off research projects to be developed and a number of students are also undertaking dissertations on aspects of the remains, including aDNA analysis of soil samples, palaeopathology, and funerary practices. Professor Murphy is keen that the people of Roscommon get a chance to learn about this important research: ‘‘We are delighted to have been given the opportunity to study the remains of the people buried at Ranelagh, which are providing a huge amount of information about daily lives, beliefs and community and family relationships in medieval Ireland.”

    150 samples from this and other Irish sites were part of Lara’s excellent recent lecture at GGI2019.
    The first of two papers should be published early next year.
    The first paper will deal with Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age.
    The second paper will deal with Late Bronze Age, Iron Age, Historic period including these Medieval samples.
    Last edited by Heber; 10-30-2019 at 12:59 AM.
    Gerard Corcoran
    R1b-DF21-S5456-S6166, H1C1

  12. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Heber For This Useful Post:

     CannabisErectusHibernius (11-24-2019),  FionnSneachta (10-30-2019),  Jessie (10-30-2019),  JMcB (10-30-2019),  razyn (10-30-2019),  rms2 (10-30-2019)

  13. #108
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,824
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    Irish
    Nationality
    Irish
    Y-DNA (P)
    M222 (S588)
    mtDNA (M)
    J1c3f

    Ireland Australia Ireland County Tipperary Ireland Munster
    Quote Originally Posted by Heber View Post
    Public lecture on the Ranelagh Osteoarchaeology Project: the 'forgotten graveyard'

    http://www.tii.ie/news/archaeology/r...eoarchaeology/

    A large, previously unrecorded, archaeological site was discovered hidden beneath the grass in Ranelagh townland (Roscommon) during archaeological investigations carried out before the construction of the N61 Coolteige Road Project. Over 54 weeks of excavation of the site was undertaken by Excavation Director Shane Delaney and his team from Irish Archaeological Consultancy Ltd, on behalf of Roscommon County Council and TII.

    They discovered that the site was in use for over 500 years, initially as a large settlement and farm enclosed by a protective bank and ditch. The artefacts discovered were typical of those from the sixth–11th century AD. They include personal items such as combs made of antler, dress accessories and jewellery, and iron knives, but also special artefacts for fine dining. Post-excavation specialist analyses are ongoing. (Peak occupation 750 AD).

    The most extraordinary discovery was, however, that the settlement had developed into a cemetery with over 1,000 human burials—long since forgotten. The subject of Professor Murphy’s talk is the scientific study of those human skeletal remains, which are being analysed under the ‘Ranelagh Osteoarchaeology Project’ based in QUB. Post-excavation analysis has focused on a detailed osteoarchaeological examination of all human skeletal remains alongside a comprehensive programme of radiocarbon dating that will facilitate a thorough understanding of the development and lifespan of the burial ground.

    A targeted programme of ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis is determining the genetic composition of particular individuals and investigating issues of familial relatedness, disease, and the potential presence of non-local people in the cemetery. The aDNA work is being carried out in collaboration with Professor Dan Bradley of Trinity College Dublin. Further collaboration involves stable isotope research undertaken by Dr Julia Beaumont of the University of Bradford. This research is exploring issues related to diet and migration, as well as maternal and infant health.

    The involvement of the University sector in the project has the added benefit of enabling smaller spin-off research projects to be developed and a number of students are also undertaking dissertations on aspects of the remains, including aDNA analysis of soil samples, palaeopathology, and funerary practices. Professor Murphy is keen that the people of Roscommon get a chance to learn about this important research: ‘‘We are delighted to have been given the opportunity to study the remains of the people buried at Ranelagh, which are providing a huge amount of information about daily lives, beliefs and community and family relationships in medieval Ireland.”

    150 samples from this and other Irish sites were part of Lara’s excellent recent lecture at GGI2019.
    The first of two papers should be published early next year.
    The first paper will deal with Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age.
    The second paper will deal with Late Bronze Age, Iron Age, Historic period including these Medieval samples.
    There is apparently a lot of M222 at this site including S588 which is of particular interest to me as my father was from Roscommon. I'm really looking forward to Lara's papers.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Jessie For This Useful Post:

     Heber (12-12-2019)

Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 91011

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-27-2019, 01:53 AM
  2. Replies: 56
    Last Post: 12-20-2015, 05:54 PM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-13-2014, 03:57 AM
  4. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-28-2013, 05:49 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •