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Thread: New Genetic Communities (Ireland)

  1. #21
    I know my Scottish DNA is specific to the Argyll Bute GBR gene - descendents of Somerled have a specific gene that filters down into the clans. This makes sense since my great-grandmother's maiden name was McDougall. I suspect something similar happens with the Irish communities.

  2. #22
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    Iím surprised the Scottish communities are not more precise given what youíve said and the limited movement.
    Last edited by Nqp15hhu; 12-06-2018 at 07:53 PM.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nqp15hhu View Post
    Iím surprised the Scottish communities are not more precise given what youíve said and the limited movement.
    I agree, despite being 50% Scottish I don't have any Scottish GC's, I don't know if it's because from Scottish perspective I am quite mixed with my ancestors coming from all over Scotland before within the last 200 years before ending up in Glasgow. Ancestry seem far better with my Irish side than my Scottish side. Saying that though I can still think of a few GC's that I should get.

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  6. #24
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    Do you have the 'Scotland' Gc at all then? I think 4 is just way too small for a country of that size.

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  8. #25
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    Thanks for this heads up. The Leinster subregion has been added and the Tyrone, Londonderry and Antrim has been added to the Ulster that I already had, with the Scotland has been unchanged, despite my dad being from Stirling. My mother has also lost her Connacht and Ulster subregions and she now has Central Ireland, with the North Leinster and East Connacht and the North Leitrim and East Sligo subregions. Her grandfather was from County Sligo

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  10. #26
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    Yes I do have Scotland as a GC but that's about as specific as it gets.

  11. #27
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    Interesting. Thereís a lot of people from NI with the Central Scotland community. You must have ancestry from all over, maybe.

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  13. #28
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    Glad to see some progress on the Genetic Communities front. I'm really hoping that this is the start of rolling out more communities to other regions as well. Certainly the UK communities cover very big areas and could do with splitting up.

    Did they update the historical "blurb" as well as the actually communities?

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    It's worth looking at the borders of the current Scottish GCs. A few areas like parts of Argyll and Berwickshire are not in any of the communities.

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  17. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loderingo View Post
    Glad to see some progress on the Genetic Communities front. I'm really hoping that this is the start of rolling out more communities to other regions as well. Certainly the UK communities cover very big areas and could do with splitting up.

    Did they update the historical "blurb" as well as the actually communities?
    The overview blurb didn't change for Connacht except for a small change in that the mention of the poorest going to Liverpool and Manchester has been removed. All my genetic communities are sub-groups of Connacht and the sub-groups don't get their own unique blurb. I don't think that the DNA story has changed since they were introduced or if it did, it would have only been small changes. This is it anyway for Connacht:

    Overview
    Life was difficult for the people of Connacht at the turn of the 19th century. As the population grew, land became scarce, and families who couldn't afford their rent were evicted from their homes with little notice. During the Great Famine, many in the west died or fled home to escape poverty and starvation. Many travelled to America's East Coast, settling in cities like New York and Boston, which became havens for these Irish immigrants.

    1775–1800 Hard Times Make Hardy Folks
     
    For the majority, life in Connacht was hard. The land tended to be poor, and so did the people. Many lived in traditional clachans, small clusters of houses surrounded by shared fields and grazing land, a practice known as rundale farming. Most were Catholic and a majority spoke Irish. However, Catholic penal laws passed by Ireland’s Protestant parliament meant that most Catholics couldn’t buy land, vote, or hold office, and they had to pay tithes to the Church of Ireland—though many of the laws weren’t strictly enforced in Connacht.


    1800–1825 Digging in Their Heels
     
    During the Napoleonic Wars the Irish economy boomed as the country supplied the British Army with food and supplies. Ireland’s population was booming as well, but Connacht tenant farmers were facing evictions from landlords who wanted to use their lands for grazing to cash in on higher beef prices during wartime. When the wars were over, recession set in. Life in Connacht became even more difficult, but the people dug in their heels and stayed. Some local men even formed secret 'Ribbon Societies' to intimidate landlords and try to protect tenants from eviction.


    1825–1850 Life as a Tenant Farmer
     
    Ireland’s growing population meant more people looking for land that was getting harder to find. Absentee landlords owned large tracts of the Irish countryside, and middlemen regularly subdivided holdings into smaller plots while increasing rents. Large families and their livestock often lived in single-room, mud cabins with no windows or chimneys. Since any home improvements became the landlord’s property, and farmers could be evicted with little notice, there was little incentive to upgrade dwellings.


     
    Historical Insight Irish Potato Famine
    In 1845 the Emerald Isle’s potato crop was ravaged by disease, causing sickness, mass starvation, and more than a million people to leave their homeland.
    “Our children swoon before us, but we cannot give them bread,” wrote Irish poet Jane Wilde during the famine. Potatoes were a staple of the Irish diet, and when a disease known as blight attacked the crops in 1845, millions were impacted by what would later become known as the Great Famine. Over the next seven years, starvation, eviction, and disease took the lives of one in four and forced more than a million men, women, and children to flee the Emerald Isle—Ireland’s population diminished by roughly 25 percent. Many emigrants flocked to American shores in search of jobs and the dream of owning land after suffering through high rents in Ireland as tenant farmers. Since most never made it out of the Northeastern cities where they had landed, Irish immigrants became a main source of labour in booming factories, as well as on the construction of the first transcontinental railroad in the United States.


     
    Historical Insight The Roman Catholic Relief Act of 1829
    The Roman Catholic Relief Act of 1829 was a major step towards Irish-Catholic emancipation but additional reforms would be necessary.
    Several months before the British government adopted the Roman Catholic Relief Act of 1829, an English periodical argued that Irish-Catholic emancipation was a political necessity to reverse the trend of Ireland being “the source of alarm, of discord, of expensive compulsory government in peace, and, in war, a source of positive weakness.” However, only a select class in Ireland benefited directly from the change. Middle-class Catholics could now enter public service or participate in the judiciary, but suffrage was constrained by an increase in the minimum property value requirement to vote. William Cobbett of the Political Register wondered how “several millions of creatures half-naked and half-starved, should be raised into comfort and content by a mere sharing of the lay, legislative, and executive powers between Protestants and Catholics, without any change whatsoever in the principles upon which those powers are executed, or in the manner or price of the execution?”


    1850–1875 The Great Hunger
     
    The Great Famine devastated Connacht: 30 % of its residents either died or emigrated. Those who couldn’t support themselves often entered the infamous workhouses—County Mayo alone had nine. Separated from family members, given poor quality food that was barely enough to keep them alive, the destitute worked for their keep. Men chopped wood and broke stones, while women washed clothes, spun wool, and took care of the ailing. Those who survived the famine and had a little money headed to port cities on America's East Coast. New York’s Five Points slum was more than 65 % Irish by 1855, with a large number coming from County Sligo.


    1875–1925 Following Friends and Family
     
    More crop failures, disease, and death in western Ireland sent immigrants to Australia and the United States. Almost 40 % who arrived in New York City were from Connacht’s five counties. People from Roscommon settled on Mission Hill in Boston; those from Galway headed to Newton, Massachusetts; and folks from Mayo made their way to Cleveland, Chicago, and eastern Pennsylvania. Family left behind in Ireland often said they couldn’t have lived without the money being sent back from America.


    1925–1950 Shaping America's Cities
     
    Although early Irish immigrants faced prejudice because of their religious beliefs and fears over their clannish behavior, Irish Americans had made their way into the mainstream. Their unity, growing numbers, and activism helped them gain power in politics, the church, and the labour movement in major cities. Immigration from Connacht eventually slowed as the United States imposed quotas in the 1920s, followed by the Great Depression and World War II. But after generations of immigration and growth, Chicago, Philadelphia, New York, and Boston remained solid Irish strongholds.


    In the following friends and family section, I know they're just giving a generalisation but most of my relatives seem to have gone to Brooklyn with some also going to Philadelphia, Boston and Rhode Island. It's nice to see that they have done some research for the communities though.
    Last edited by FionnSneachta; 12-07-2018 at 04:59 PM.
    Ancestry: Ireland (Paper trail ≅ 81.25% Roscommon, 12.5% Galway, 6.25% Mayo)
    Paternal ancestor (Y): Kelly b. c1830 in Co. Roscommon (UŪ Maine)
    Father's mtDNA: Fleming b. c1831 in Co. Roscommon (H27e)
    Maternal ancestor (mt): McDermott b. c1814 in Co. Roscommon
    Paternal great grandfather (mt): Connella b. c1798 in Co. Roscommon (T2a1a8)

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