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Thread: Stone Age people were living on the Himalayan plateau 30,000 years ago

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    Stone Age people were living on the Himalayan plateau 30,000 years ago

    Living in Tibet isnt easy nowadays it must have been hellish 300 centuries ago. Yet for some reason, ancient people decided to settle down there, a new archaeological dig has revealed. And by there, I mean 4,600 meters (15,000 feet) above sea level.


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    These are likely Y-hap D carriers who went into these remote places for safety. There was always competition from other human immigrants and the older hominid species, as this ancestry has also been found in Tibetans. After evolving for high altitude habitation they were effective in passing on ydna D unto the Tibetans instead of being absorbed or isolated in small areas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by talljimmy0 View Post
    These are likely Y-hap D carriers who went into these remote places for safety.
    Perhaps.

    There are at least five extant subclades of Y-DNA haplogroup D that are only distantly related to each other (TMRCA approximately 45,000 ybp on YFull's scale). Two of these five are now found mostly on and around the Tibetan Plateau, one is found mostly in Japan (and with minor presence in Korea), one is found among the indigenous inhabitants of the Andaman Islands, and one (the most basal by a slight margin) is found with low frequency in the Philippines.

    The two subclades found mostly on and around the Tibetan Plateau, D-P99 and D-F901, share only 25 SNPs with each other subsequent to their most recent common ancestor with other extant subclades of haplogroup D according to the current version of YFull. After that point, they may have had separate histories to some degree. However, besides their high frequency among modern inhabitants of the Tibetan Plateau, both subclades have been found with low frequency over a wide area of Eurasia. Members of certain branches of D-F901 have been found even in Japan, so at least some members of the clade must have been in a position to migrate to that archipelago.

    Ancient DNA is necessary to get a clearer picture of where members of each of these subclades were living around the time of the onset of agriculture in the plains and river valleys of what is now China.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ebizur View Post
    Perhaps.

    There are at least five extant subclades of Y-DNA haplogroup D that are only distantly related to each other (TMRCA approximately 45,000 ybp on YFull's scale). Two of these five are now found mostly on and around the Tibetan Plateau, one is found mostly in Japan (and with minor presence in Korea), one is found among the indigenous inhabitants of the Andaman Islands, and one (the most basal by a slight margin) is found with low frequency in the Philippines.

    The two subclades found mostly on and around the Tibetan Plateau, D-P99 and D-F901, share only 25 SNPs with each other subsequent to their most recent common ancestor with other extant subclades of haplogroup D according to the current version of YFull. After that point, they may have had separate histories to some degree. However, besides their high frequency among modern inhabitants of the Tibetan Plateau, both subclades have been found with low frequency over a wide area of Eurasia. Members of certain branches of D-F901 have been found even in Japan, so at least some members of the clade must have been in a position to migrate to that archipelago.

    Ancient DNA is necessary to get a clearer picture of where members of each of these subclades were living around the time of the onset of agriculture in the plains and river valleys of what is now China.
    Was the status of the Tibetan DE resolved further, or do they still remain DE*?

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    Quote Originally Posted by parasar View Post
    Was the status of the Tibetan DE resolved further, or do they still remain DE*?
    I do not recall having seen anything regarding alleged cases of DE* in Tibet since the paper by Hong Shi, Hua Zhong, Yi Peng, et al. (2008), "Y chromosome evidence of earliest modern human settlement in East Asia and multiple origins of Tibetan and Japanese populations." According to Table 2 of that paper, DE* has been found in 0.34% (2/594) of one sample of Tibetans, whereas it has not been found (0/128) in another sample of Tibetans.

    Xuebin Qi, Chaoying Cui, Yi Peng, et al. (2013) have reported finding haplogroup E-M40 in 1.11% (2/180) of a sample collected in a location by the Yarlung Tsangpo River that appears to be Shigatse proper (Samzhubz District). They also have reported finding D-M174(xM15, P99) in 0.43% (1/233) of a pool of samples from Nagqu and 0.1% (1/1028) of a pool of samples from Lhasa. However, they have not reported finding any instance of DE-YAP(xE-M40, D-M174).

    Members of Y-DNA haplogroup E also have been found in populations of areas surrounding Tibet (e.g. Bhutan, Tharu in Morang District of Nepal, Thailand, Uyghur in Hotan and Turpan and Hui in Changji of Xinjiang, Hui in Ningxia). I suspect that the reported cases of DE* may in fact be cases of haplogroup E that have not been tested properly for markers of that haplogroup.

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