Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 52

Thread: Ancestry new calculator not good

  1. #11
    Registered Users
    Posts
    945
    Sex
    Location
    Kent
    Ethnicity
    Isles Celto-Germanic
    Nationality
    British
    Y-DNA
    I1 Z140+ A21912+
    mtDNA
    V

    Wales England Cornwall Scotland Ireland
    Quote Originally Posted by johnthe View Post
    I found the Ancestry update to be very accurate. That said, it's clear they use data from members of your family tree to link to certain areas and migrations. For my Irish ancestry the update displayed areas in Ireland which I had seen on people within relatives linked to me.
    If I might add, for my wife (who had far fewer matches than I), there was no such update. I like their accuracy for West European data but other regions- not so much. I am puzzled as to why with their large customer base they still cannot find accurate answers for areas like the Pacific Islands, Central Asian countries, and even many of the Eastern Euro countries are way way off.
    Thanks for that post. I guess it explains why I get Southern England as my main location. Don't get me wrong, I love the region, live in the east of it and was born in the west of it, but I don't think it sums up my ancestry, which is far more diverse. I assume the Scandinavia I get is actually from Yorkshire and similar ancestors, of which I have many.
    Living DNA Cautious mode:
    South Wales Border-related ancestry: 86.8%
    Cornwall: 8%
    Cumbria-related ancestry: 5.2%
    Y line: Peak District, England. Big Y match: Scania, Sweden; TMRCA 1,280 ybp (YFull);
    mtDNA: traces to Glamorgan, Wales, 18th century. Mother's Y line (Wales): R-L21 L371

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to JonikW For This Useful Post:

     Scarlet Ibis (12-30-2018)

  3. #12
    Registered Users
    Posts
    164
    Sex
    Location
    Canada
    Ethnicity
    European
    Nationality
    Typical Canadian Mutt
    Y-DNA
    R-DF27 -> FGC34856
    mtDNA
    J1c2e

    Ireland Ukraine England France Canada
    Quote Originally Posted by rms2 View Post
    I feel almost exactly the opposite. I like Ancestry, but they use Timber, which tends to reduce and even eliminate matches.

    And FTDNA is practically the only game in town for y-chromosome testing.

    For me, FTDNA has been a tremendous success.
    I am a committed fanboy of FTDNA - I have had major breakthroughs with them that could not have come from any other company. Firstly, my father did not know his biological parents as he was adopted. One Y111 test solved that quickly, showing 5 men out of 10 with the same surname at 67 markers, and one of these at Y111. That nailed my surname early on, and today I now have three matches with this surname on the BigY test. With this one surname I was able to place all of my stronger AncestryDNA matches, and build my father's paternal family tree fully. All this thanks to FTDNAs amazing database.

    Then there was my father's mother, also unknown. All I knew is that her surname might have been "Moody". I'd still be waiting in the dark if I relied on any/all of the other companies. Thanks to FTDNA's presence at international genealogical conferences, my 2nd cousin saw them at "Who Do You Think You Are?" in England in 2017. He bought a kit, and boom - a day after he appeared on FTDNA's autosomal database I had found my father's mother.

    FTDNA was the company that solved the major mysteries of my life.
    Mum = 50% Irish, 50% Ukrainian
    Dad = 40% French-Canadian, 10% Irish, 50% English
    Big Y + YTree.net = R M269 -> DF27 -> Z195 -> FGC34881 -> FGC34865 (SW France; ~500 ybp)
    FTDNA mtDNA Full Sequence = J1c2e
    Most Distant Known Ancestor = Jean Moreau b. 1630s Parthenay, Deux-Sèvres, France
    Surnames = Welch, Chibry, Moreau, Todd, Anderson, Bedford, Joncas, Basaraba

  4. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to fostert For This Useful Post:

     coffeeprince (12-31-2018),  digital_noise (12-30-2018),  euromutt (12-31-2018),  FionnSneachta (12-30-2018),  JonikW (12-30-2018),  msmarjoribanks (12-31-2018),  rms2 (12-31-2018),  Scarlet Ibis (12-30-2018),  timberwolf (12-30-2018),  tomz (01-06-2019)

  5. #13
    Registered Users
    Posts
    945
    Sex
    Location
    Kent
    Ethnicity
    Isles Celto-Germanic
    Nationality
    British
    Y-DNA
    I1 Z140+ A21912+
    mtDNA
    V

    Wales England Cornwall Scotland Ireland
    Quote Originally Posted by fostert View Post
    I am a committed fanboy of FTDNA - I have had major breakthroughs with them that could not have come from any other company. Firstly, my father did not know his biological parents as he was adopted. One Y111 test solved that quickly, showing 5 men out of 10 with the same surname at 67 markers, and one of these at Y111. That nailed my surname early on, and today I now have three matches with this surname on the BigY test. With this one surname I was able to place all of my stronger AncestryDNA matches, and build my father's paternal family tree fully. All this thanks to FTDNAs amazing database.

    Then there was my father's mother, also unknown. All I knew is that her surname might have been "Moody". I'd still be waiting in the dark if I relied on any/all of the other companies. Thanks to FTDNA's presence at international genealogical conferences, my 2nd cousin saw them at "Who Do You Think You Are?" in England in 2017. He bought a kit, and boom - a day after he appeared on FTDNA's autosomal database I had found my father's mother.

    FTDNA was the company that solved the major mysteries of my life.
    There's nothing to say after that endorsement apart from the fact that I'm also glad to have tested. Just look at the wealth of information provided in your signature as a result. I'd say your story sums up the power of DNA testing at its best. Thanks for sharing it.
    Living DNA Cautious mode:
    South Wales Border-related ancestry: 86.8%
    Cornwall: 8%
    Cumbria-related ancestry: 5.2%
    Y line: Peak District, England. Big Y match: Scania, Sweden; TMRCA 1,280 ybp (YFull);
    mtDNA: traces to Glamorgan, Wales, 18th century. Mother's Y line (Wales): R-L21 L371

  6. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to JonikW For This Useful Post:

     fostert (12-30-2018),  rms2 (12-31-2018),  Scarlet Ibis (12-30-2018),  timberwolf (12-30-2018),  tomz (01-06-2019)

  7. #14
    Registered Users
    Posts
    307
    Sex
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Ethnicity
    White European
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA
    I-M223
    mtDNA
    T2b

    England Scotland Germany Switzerland Italy Norway
    The ethnicity update may be less accurate now for some people (certainly not everyone), and not having a chromosome browser for matches is a con too - however, AncestryDNA still have the biggest (by far) database of testers, meaning more matches and greater chances of more meaningful matches.

    Also, in my experience, people are more likely to have a family tree at AncestryDNA. While many don't, it's still better than competitors. 23andMe don't even host family trees anymore, meaning you can only get any worthwhile info out of your matches if you contact people and they respond with details about their genealogy or a link to a tree elsewhere (which then becomes cumbersome to compare trees among other matches). FamilyTreeDNA host trees, but the interface is terrible and furthermore, FTDNA isn't a genealogy website, so many people don't bother to upload their gedcom. MyHeritage host trees and it's also a genealogy website, but they limit how many people you can add to a tree without subscribing (something Ancestry don't do), so many people again don't bother. Chromosome browsers are useful, but you will literally get nowhere with your matches if you can't find out about their family tree. You can compare all the segments of shared DNA you want, without family trees to compare too, it doesn't mean much.

    Lastly, there are certain browser extensions that only work with AncestryDNA, which can make your workflow much faster, aiding in identification of matches. Mainly, MedBetterDNA allows you to search matches by hastags in notes, and also will turn notes on to always display, so you can quickly scan them for identifications.

    As a result of all this, I have had much more success at identifying MRCAs with matches at AncestryDNA than any other company (literally hundreds), sometimes even breaking down brick walls in my tree (including finding the identity of my grandfather's bio father). You can take a look for yourself here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...c7sUOa/pubhtml

    And I've been able to at least ID the likely branch a match belongs to on hundreds more (based on shared matches).
    Last edited by RobinBMc; 12-31-2018 at 02:29 AM.

  8. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to RobinBMc For This Useful Post:

     FionnSneachta (12-31-2018),  fostert (12-31-2018),  msmarjoribanks (12-31-2018),  timberwolf (12-31-2018)

  9. #15
    Registered Users
    Posts
    42
    Sex
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA
    R1a-L365
    mtDNA
    H1c3

    Poland Pomerania Denmark France Sweden Russia Imperial Germany
    My thought is that my FTDNA AC results were strange (too much Scandinavian and EE, oddly no West and Central Europe in my results). MyHeritage was not much better.

    23andMe has by far been more accurate with my papertrail. I am split with their new beta regions, though.

    Ancestry is getting close, but for anyone with EE, French, or Baltic ties it is very hit or miss. My EE was more accurate for me prior to the update and identical to 23andMe, for what it's worth. My Germanic and Sweden/Norway were picked up very well with the update. France is an enigma, one that I hope is corrected in the future. I prefer 23andMe's broader categories rather than trying to single out countries like France, but I think I am in the minority here.
    Paper trail includes:

    25% Russian
    25% French
    25% German
    12.5% Prussian (Pomeranian)
    6.25% Danish
    6.25% Swedish

  10. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to boilermeschew827 For This Useful Post:

     fostert (12-31-2018),  ianz91 (12-31-2018),  JerryS. (12-31-2018),  sktibo (01-01-2019),  tomz (01-06-2019)

  11. #16
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,946
    Sex
    Location
    Taiwan
    Ethnicity
    Métis
    Nationality
    Canadian
    Y-DNA
    R-Z198 (DF27)
    mtDNA
    T2B-T152C

    Canada England Scotland Germany Poland France
    For myself and my family ancestrys update was a tremendous improvement. I found all of my brick wall breaking matches through ftdna, although i found its ethnicity estimate to be horrendous.
    Paper trail ancestry to the best of my knowledge:
    English (possibly containing some Welsh ancestry) 31.25%, Eastern European and Eastern German (Galicia, Poland) 25%, Scottish 17.96%, Scotch-Irish 12.5%, French 8.2%, Native American 1.95%, and Colonial American, 3.125%, which cannot be determined with complete certainty: there is Dutch (at least 1.36%) and some English. The rest could include Spanish, Norwegian, German, and French, but these percentages would be minuscule.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to sktibo For This Useful Post:

     fostert (12-31-2018)

  13. #17
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,946
    Sex
    Location
    Taiwan
    Ethnicity
    Métis
    Nationality
    Canadian
    Y-DNA
    R-Z198 (DF27)
    mtDNA
    T2B-T152C

    Canada England Scotland Germany Poland France
    Quote Originally Posted by boilermeschew827 View Post
    My thought is that my FTDNA AC results were strange (too much Scandinavian and EE, oddly no West and Central Europe in my results). MyHeritage was not much better.

    23andMe has by far been more accurate with my papertrail. I am split with their new beta regions, though.

    Ancestry is getting close, but for anyone with EE, French, or Baltic ties it is very hit or miss. My EE was more accurate for me prior to the update and identical to 23andMe, for what it's worth. My Germanic and Sweden/Norway were picked up very well with the update. France is an enigma, one that I hope is corrected in the future. I prefer 23andMe's broader categories rather than trying to single out countries like France, but I think I am in the minority here.
    I can't speak for French but for French Canadian ancestry it did very well for my family, and for one friend with a french canadian mother it assigned nearly 50% France. I was particularly impressed by that.
    Paper trail ancestry to the best of my knowledge:
    English (possibly containing some Welsh ancestry) 31.25%, Eastern European and Eastern German (Galicia, Poland) 25%, Scottish 17.96%, Scotch-Irish 12.5%, French 8.2%, Native American 1.95%, and Colonial American, 3.125%, which cannot be determined with complete certainty: there is Dutch (at least 1.36%) and some English. The rest could include Spanish, Norwegian, German, and French, but these percentages would be minuscule.

  14. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to sktibo For This Useful Post:

     boilermeschew827 (12-31-2018),  fostert (12-31-2018)

  15. #18
    Registered Users
    Posts
    42
    Sex
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA
    R1a-L365
    mtDNA
    H1c3

    Poland Pomerania Denmark France Sweden Russia Imperial Germany
    Quote Originally Posted by sktibo View Post
    I can't speak for French but for French Canadian ancestry it did very well for my family, and for one friend with a french canadian mother it assigned nearly 50% France. I was particularly impressed by that.
    Yes, I've seen many French Canadians with high "France" breakdowns. I've stated elsewhere that I got 2% France, which I thought was funny. I think it depends on the individual's admixture and the reference sample baseline.

    Because I am 2nd generation (is that right? grandma is 100%, mom is 50%, I'd be 25%), and mixed with different regions of Europe it could just be me being a hard read. Comparing my 23andMe inheritance from my mom and grandma, my grandma has something like 46% F/G, 24% B/I and 10% Iberian with small Italian amounts. I only inherited minor B/I and Iberian amounts from my mom, so it seems I inherited a fraction of what is considered "France" in my case - the rest being read as England/NW Europe or Germanic Europe. Or it could be that central France is not represented very well with the reference sample, who knows.

    I will say it is odd that many nMonte calculators pick up my French much better than Ancestry. Sorry for the dissertation, I've put a lot of thought into why my results left much to be desired!
    Last edited by Administrator; 01-11-2019 at 04:34 AM. Reason: Commerial comment removed per section 1.8. Message 'Administrator' for details.
    Paper trail includes:

    25% Russian
    25% French
    25% German
    12.5% Prussian (Pomeranian)
    6.25% Danish
    6.25% Swedish

  16. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to boilermeschew827 For This Useful Post:

     fostert (12-31-2018),  msmarjoribanks (12-31-2018),  tomz (01-06-2019)

  17. #19
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,320
    Sex
    Location
    America
    Ethnicity
    North & Ionian Seas
    Nationality
    American

    England Italy Germany Scotland
    I think the issues are with people who are regional diverse. that sort of background gives ethnicity calculators fits. people that are equal mix of French and German will be pleased, as will be people who are equal mix of Norwegian and Greek. where the head scratching comes in is when people are diversified in regions and sub regions.... as in part Scandinavian, part Mediterranean, part Slavic, part Brittonic, part Celtic, part...… its like a cookie cutter 25% or more of something shows easily enough, but less than that and it starts getting grey for them....

  18. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to JerryS. For This Useful Post:

     boilermeschew827 (12-31-2018),  fostert (01-01-2019),  JFWinstone (12-31-2018),  msmarjoribanks (01-01-2019),  tomz (01-06-2019)

  19. #20
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    1,426
    Sex
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois
    Ethnicity
    mixed European
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA
    Dad: R1b/L21/DF63
    mtDNA
    K2b2

    Quote Originally Posted by sktibo View Post
    For myself and my family ancestrys update was a tremendous improvement. I found all of my brick wall breaking matches through ftdna, although i found its ethnicity estimate to be horrendous.
    This is true for me, except that Ancestry + FTDNA are responsible for my most progress, along with people who tested at both or put their results on Gedmatch. Ancestry is great due to number of matches -- I can easily put people into buckets. FTDNA is great due to Y and mt and a recently-discovered cluster, and because I have my parents on FTDNA, not Ancestry.

    The ethnicity estimate is not great on FTDNA -- it ignores my central/western Europe (German and Sweden) and dumps it into 85% British Isles and 15% EE, when I'm not EE at all and the British Isles is too high. Amusingly my sister and I get identically inaccurate results. It's best on 23andMe and now good on Ancestry (Ancestry is good and bad in different ways for my sister and me).

    That said, I've never once regretted testing at FTDNA, and love all the projects.

  20. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to msmarjoribanks For This Useful Post:

     fostert (01-01-2019),  sktibo (01-01-2019)

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-12-2018, 12:25 PM
  2. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 11-22-2017, 09:37 PM
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-11-2017, 06:15 PM
  4. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-04-2016, 09:33 PM
  5. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-14-2016, 10:02 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •