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Thread: What percentage of people in United States do you think descends from Celts

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    What percentage of people in United States do you think descends from Celts

    I want to know what states has more celt heritage

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    Demographics are changing rapidly in the USA, but I would say right now, without trying to do a lot of research, that the southern states region, i.e., the old Confederacy, is probably the most British/Irish region. I'm talking about overall ancestry. I realize there are Irish enclaves in places like Boston, New York, and San Francisco, as well.
     


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    Quote Originally Posted by Emilio Delfin Vang B View Post
    I want to know what states has more celt heritage
    Based on the below, I would say New England States. New Hampshire seems the highest overall



    Y-DNA R-Z49>Z142>Z12222>FGC12378>FGC12401>FGC12384
    Ancestry: 37% English, 26% Scot/Ulster Scot, 14% Welsh, 14% German 3% Ireland, 3% Nordic, 2% French & Dutch, 1% India

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    If you add some French, Some Italians, Some Germans, Some English, Irish, Scot, ScotIrish they are like 50% of population.

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    Here are the Scotch-Irish, Scottish, Irish, Welsh Americans at the county level
    Higher resolution maps here https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ac/2d...9818602fd2.png


    https://cdn2.vox-cdn.com/uploads/cho.../dqgSf6t.0.gif
    Last edited by MitchellSince1893; 01-12-2019 at 07:30 PM.
    Y-DNA R-Z49>Z142>Z12222>FGC12378>FGC12401>FGC12384
    Ancestry: 37% English, 26% Scot/Ulster Scot, 14% Welsh, 14% German 3% Ireland, 3% Nordic, 2% French & Dutch, 1% India

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    If using the census numbers you should probably add the "just American" people who likely have Scots-Irish and English heritage, at least in significant part.

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    That Pennsylvania was one of the highest for Welsh didn't surprise me, and I knew OH was higher than many states, but Utah surprised me, so I googled to learn the history. As I suspected, it's related to the old Mormon missions to the UK. I hadn't realized there was particular success in Wales.

    This is interesting: https://www.utahhumanities.org/stories/items/show/295

    "Like other countries in Europe during the 19th Century, Wales felt the effects of the Industrial Revolution. Rapid increases in population and harsh working conditions in manufacturing and coal mining led to worker riots and clashes with factory and mine owners. The first Mormon missionaries arrived in Wales in 1840 and had great success in cities dealing with poverty and social conflict. But for many of the Welsh converts, the promise of a new life in America was not always realized.

    Once settled in Utah, these Welsh immigrants sought to improve their circumstances, yet found their old lives were hard to leave behind. Their specialized coal mining skills were naturally sought after by Mormon leaders setting up industries in an effort to create a self-sufficient economy.

    In 1854 two Welsh miners, John Price and John Reese, were assigned to tap a source of coal located at the foot of the Sanpitch Mountains in central Utah. Nearby the new mine they established a town called Coalbed, which they later renamed Wales in honor of their homeland. The community was populated solely by immigrants from the British Isles, a little bit of home transplanted to Utah.

    When a disastrous accident in the Cymmer Mine back home in Wales claimed 114 lives in 1856, the Welsh miners in Utah were no doubt reminded that the harsh and dangerous working conditions they had fled could someday become a reality in Utah. In peak years, the mines near the town of Wales employed 200 men before giving way to larger, more profitable mines in nearby Carbon County. Those, too, drew many Welshmen and their skills. In 1900, when Carbon County’s Scofield Mine Disaster claimed more than 200 lives – many of them Welsh – those earlier fears of recreating dangerous working conditions were sorely realized."

    For Idaho: https://www.idahostatesman.com/news/...e98424887.html

    "The Welsh have a long and interesting history in Idaho. Three years before Davis was born, the U.S. census of 1870 recorded these people born in Wales living in Ada County: Barrett Williams, 67, farmer; his wife, Elizabeth, 57; and five children, the oldest born in Ohio, the others born in Wisconsin. Joel Jones, 36, was a boot maker, and James Hopkins, 29, was a stone mason. In Idaho County, R. Roberts, 35, J. Wilson, 35, and Philip Evans, 60, were miners. Jane Haskell, 32, was a dress maker. Owyhee County had seven Welsh-born miners and one man working in a sawmill.

    By far the largest number of Welsh-born people living in Idaho at the end of the 19th century were Mormon converts who had moved west with Brigham Young in the great migration to Utah in 1847 and were then sent north as colonists to form new agricultural communities in southeastern Idaho. Today it is estimated that about 20 percent of the population of Utah is of Welsh descent, and that may be true for southeast Idaho as well."

    My Welsh ancestors who came most recently settled in Wisconsin, which at the time had a large Welsh (and Welsh-speaking) community in one area, but then moved west to Washington (but near the Idaho border).

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    My Welsh ancestors went from Newtown, Wales to Eastern Tennessee in the Knoxville area in the late 1800s.
    Here is a map of colonial settlements. The orange area southeast of Charlotte, NC is where my Scot-Irish ancestors settled.

    Last edited by MitchellSince1893; 01-12-2019 at 08:54 PM.
    Y-DNA R-Z49>Z142>Z12222>FGC12378>FGC12401>FGC12384
    Ancestry: 37% English, 26% Scot/Ulster Scot, 14% Welsh, 14% German 3% Ireland, 3% Nordic, 2% French & Dutch, 1% India

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    I have other suspected Welsh who settled in Jackson and Gallia, OH, which were heavily Welsh areas.

    The Scots-Irish I know about in my family settled in Augusta Co, Virginia (orange on your colonial settlement map), and then--like many--went to Kentucky and then into the southeastern tip of Illinois (Pope and Hardin counties). I've found their land purchase records for that part of Illinois in 1816 and 1818. Then in the 1830s they moved north (a little ways north, it's still only about a third of the way up the state) to Fayette Co.

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    Quote Originally Posted by msmarjoribanks View Post
    That Pennsylvania was one of the highest for Welsh didn't surprise me, and I knew OH was higher than many states, but Utah surprised me, so I googled to learn the history. As I suspected, it's related to the old Mormon missions to the UK. I hadn't realized there was particular success in Wales.

    This is interesting: https://www.utahhumanities.org/stories/items/show/295

    "Like other countries in Europe during the 19th Century, Wales felt the effects of the Industrial Revolution. Rapid increases in population and harsh working conditions in manufacturing and coal mining led to worker riots and clashes with factory and mine owners. The first Mormon missionaries arrived in Wales in 1840 and had great success in cities dealing with poverty and social conflict. But for many of the Welsh converts, the promise of a new life in America was not always realized.

    Once settled in Utah, these Welsh immigrants sought to improve their circumstances, yet found their old lives were hard to leave behind. Their specialized coal mining skills were naturally sought after by Mormon leaders setting up industries in an effort to create a self-sufficient economy.

    In 1854 two Welsh miners, John Price and John Reese, were assigned to tap a source of coal located at the foot of the Sanpitch Mountains in central Utah. Nearby the new mine they established a town called Coalbed, which they later renamed Wales in honor of their homeland. The community was populated solely by immigrants from the British Isles, a little bit of home transplanted to Utah.

    When a disastrous accident in the Cymmer Mine back home in Wales claimed 114 lives in 1856, the Welsh miners in Utah were no doubt reminded that the harsh and dangerous working conditions they had fled could someday become a reality in Utah. In peak years, the mines near the town of Wales employed 200 men before giving way to larger, more profitable mines in nearby Carbon County. Those, too, drew many Welshmen and their skills. In 1900, when Carbon County’s Scofield Mine Disaster claimed more than 200 lives – many of them Welsh – those earlier fears of recreating dangerous working conditions were sorely realized."

    For Idaho: https://www.idahostatesman.com/news/...e98424887.html

    "The Welsh have a long and interesting history in Idaho. Three years before Davis was born, the U.S. census of 1870 recorded these people born in Wales living in Ada County: Barrett Williams, 67, farmer; his wife, Elizabeth, 57; and five children, the oldest born in Ohio, the others born in Wisconsin. Joel Jones, 36, was a boot maker, and James Hopkins, 29, was a stone mason. In Idaho County, R. Roberts, 35, J. Wilson, 35, and Philip Evans, 60, were miners. Jane Haskell, 32, was a dress maker. Owyhee County had seven Welsh-born miners and one man working in a sawmill.

    By far the largest number of Welsh-born people living in Idaho at the end of the 19th century were Mormon converts who had moved west with Brigham Young in the great migration to Utah in 1847 and were then sent north as colonists to form new agricultural communities in southeastern Idaho. Today it is estimated that about 20 percent of the population of Utah is of Welsh descent, and that may be true for southeast Idaho as well."

    My Welsh ancestors who came most recently settled in Wisconsin, which at the time had a large Welsh (and Welsh-speaking) community in one area, but then moved west to Washington (but near the Idaho border).
    On a bit of a tangent: I was surprised at these quotes about Welsh Mormons... It is of course true that many of the earliest emigrants to Utah from the UK were Welsh. They went on from Utah to Idaho, Alberta and Montana etc.. But the emigration was far wider than coal miners.The people I know most about were from rural Carmarthenshire. It seems that the established church was particularly weak in rural Carmarthenshir, leaving a bit of a vacuum. The emigrants weren’t particularly the rural poor, they included craftsmen, farmers and shopkeepers. Apparently my 3x great grandparents converted but didn’t emigrate. Two of their siblings emigrated in the early years followed by their daughter in the 1870s.

    There is a database of Welsh Mormon emigrants at http://welshmormon.byu.edu/Immigrants_Listing.aspx
    All 32 3xgreat grandparents were Welsh. Two 6xgreat grandparents from England and a few Irish or English surnames before 1800. Paper trail shows several C11th to C14th Anglo-Norman lines and C11th Norse-Irish lines.

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