Interesting bits I came across in a paper by Eleanor Coghill on The Verbal System Of North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic. My vernacular is a NENA dialect.

Dissertation for the M.Phil. Degree, 1999
Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Cambridge

It was comparison with Old Persian that prompted Kutscher (1969) to suggest a theory for the origin of Qtil li [in NENA]. Old Persian is an Iranian dialect known from inscriptions of Achaemenid kings.

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Benveniste argued that the construction was a variation of the habeo factum type of perfect. This construction is found in many Indo-European languages, among them Germanic languages, Romance languages and Hittite.

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The evidence seems to suggest that the expression was originally passive. But what of the Old Persian analogy? Benveniste’s analysis has since been challenged by Cardona (1970).

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It is not necessarily coincidental that Old Persian possessed a form very similar in structure to Qtil li, i.e. man krtam. E.Y. Kutscher (1969), who first noted the similarity between the two constructions, suggested that it might be a case of borrowing.

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None of these arguments prove that the construction was influenced by Iranian, yet the form’s restriction to the area of intense contact with Iranian and its absence before that contact, make it highly likely that this was the case.