So i have some questions about this article linked below, and was wondering if anyone could answer. These are tenous questions at best, and I don't know the difference between nongenic and genic SNP's and nonsynonomous.

https://www.nature.com/scitable/topi...phenotypic-706

Is this the research which the ethnicity admixture tests are based on?

""In terms of this study, a low FST value for a SNP can be interpreted to mean that individuals from the subpopulation tend to share alleles with the total population. In other words, a low level of differentiation for that SNP has occurred in the subpopulation since breaking off from the total population. On the other hand, a high FST value for a SNP means that a high level of differentiation for that SNP has occurred in members of the subpopulation compared to the total population, and therefore members of the subpopulation tend to carry unique alleles compared to the total population.

In this study, the genome-wide mean FST value across all SNP classes was found to be 0.11, interpreted as a moderate level of differentiation. The researchers interpreted FST values below 0.05 as indicating low differentiation and values above 0.65 as indicating extreme differentiation.""

Do they only look at SNP's only with high FST, more so than ones with low FST in DNA ethnicity testing?

"The researchers identified 582 genes that contained a SNP with FST values greater than 0.65 and have therefore been under positive selection pressures. Several of these genes are known to control variable morphological traits in humans"

Are these some of the SNP's looked at?

Ancestry DNA and co. look at 200,000- 300,000 SNP's... Are the specific SNP's they look at enough to account or be generalisable for the remaining 1+ million because looking at one area, because all the variation in differences in SNP's is evenly spread throught out all SNP's?