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Thread: Cousin couples

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFWinstone View Post
    Interesting... My father and his first wife are first cousins so that makes their children my half siblings but also 1st cousin 1 removed right?
    Your dad and his first wife are first cousins, so she would be your first cousin once removed, and their children would be your second cousins.

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  3. #12
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  4. #13
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    If you look into other mammals inbreeding is further complicated by populations that have extremely limited genetic diversity and have managed to survive for a long time. In these extreme cases (most famously cheetahs) but possibly more worrying is the logical assumption that with less diversity they won't be able to adapt to a change in their environment, which puts them in a precarious position.

    Smithsonian's write-up of pleistocene abnormalities in humans theorized to be due to inbreeding
    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart...ies-180970733/

    contrasted with this article on a UC Santa Cruz study on the Pocket Gopher which provides a 2nd case of a species with a population so similar that they don't reject skin grafts from other non-identical donor animals (which is called an allograft)
    http://insci14.ucsd.edu/~bi178s/Gene...ahgenetics.htm

    FWIW the to my knowledge the most inbred living populations we know of are self isolating ethnoreligious groups like the Samaritans and Amish/Mennonites/Hutterites. If I had to guess I'd probably go with the sentinelese being even more inbred.

  5. #14
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    I think this may have to do more with religion, Christianity was the dominant religion of Europe and so since Christianity prohibits it as incest this got viewed as embarrassing and unusual. Not to mention cousin marriage tends to cause genetic and physical abnormalities many times.
    Last edited by Moe12; 05-09-2019 at 02:17 PM.

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    Despite first cousin marriages being forbidden (considered invalid) by the Catholic Church, it actually was not banned in most of Europe. From the article I linked:

    "Nonetheless, in both the US and Europe, the frequency of first-cousin marriage—a practice that had often been favored, especially by elites—sharply declined during the second half of the 19th century [3]. (The reasons are both complex and contested, but likely include improved transportation and communication, which increased the range of marriage partners; a decline in family size, which limited the number of marriageable cousins; and greater female mobility and autonomy [4,5].) The fact that no European country barred cousins from marrying, while many US states did and still do, has often been interpreted as proof of a special American animosity toward the practice [6]. But this explanation ignores a number of factors, including the ease with which a handful of highly motivated activists—or even one individual—can be effective in the decentralized American system, especially when feelings do not run high on the other side of an issue. The recent Texas experience, where a state representative quietly tacked an amendment barring first-cousin marriage onto a child protection bill, is a case in point."

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    From another thread on this same topic:

    "William D Craig m. Elizabeth Nickell
    Daughter: Martha Craig m. Ambrose J. Jones Son: see below
    Thomas B. Newton m. Nancy Agnes Craig(sister of above William Craig)
    Daughter: Martha P. Newton m. (son from above) Ambrose J. Jones Jr.
    son: Uriah Jones M. Matilda Jane Nickell (the above Elizabeth Nickell is her great aunt)

    I have counted about 28 times a Nickell married a Jones on my tree. They were all from Augusta, Virginia then moved to Morgan County, Kentucky before ending up in Oklahoma.

    My grandparents are first cousins on the Jones side, of course. They both descend from Uriah Jones and Matilda Jane Nickell."

    This is on my dad's side. It has made me be very careful not to duplicate entries on my tree at Ancestry. The other issue is that my grandfather is a Webb-Jones and my grandmother is a Jones-Bryant, so if I am trying to look only for Webb, I have to run common matches with my grandfather's cousins via his father's sister.

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    Quote Originally Posted by msmarjoribanks View Post
    Despite first cousin marriages being forbidden (considered invalid) by the Catholic Church, it actually was not banned in most of Europe. From the article I linked:

    "Nonetheless, in both the US and Europe, the frequency of first-cousin marriage—a practice that had often been favored, especially by elites—sharply declined during the second half of the 19th century [3]. (The reasons are both complex and contested, but likely include improved transportation and communication, which increased the range of marriage partners; a decline in family size, which limited the number of marriageable cousins; and greater female mobility and autonomy [4,5].) The fact that no European country barred cousins from marrying, while many US states did and still do, has often been interpreted as proof of a special American animosity toward the practice [6]. But this explanation ignores a number of factors, including the ease with which a handful of highly motivated activists—or even one individual—can be effective in the decentralized American system, especially when feelings do not run high on the other side of an issue. The recent Texas experience, where a state representative quietly tacked an amendment barring first-cousin marriage onto a child protection bill, is a case in point."
    There was stigma against it in the Carolingian period and further (there was an obsession against incest to the point where even five degrees of consanguinity wasn't enough; even god-parents and their children were considered kin). Charlemagne even instigated an inquisition about it and asked bishops to enforce it. By the time of the Protestant Reformation though, many denominations rolled back these bans and cousin marriage became more common among elites like Charles Darwin for example. Jack Goody's book The Development of the Family and Marriage in Europe is a good source on the topic and the appendices of this paper provides supporting evidence for the existence of bans on cousin marriage in medieval Europe.
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    It's really not that uncommon. Probably everyone has a case of this at least once in their tree somewhere, even if they haven't uncovered it yet. My 2nd great grandparents were 2nd cousins. And on the same branch, 3rd great grandparents were 1st cousins once removed. On another branch, I've got 7th great grandparents who were 2nd cousins. And a different set of 7th great grandparents were 1st cousins.

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  11. #19
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    I think the banjo player's parents were first cousins.

     


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  12. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rms2 View Post
    I think the banjo player's parents were first cousins.

    I don't believe the actor (Billy Redden) himself was inbred, he just had odd features(+cosmetics to play the part) as far as I know.

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