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Thread: What are the Irish genetically speaking in summary

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by alan View Post
    In the northern half of the western seaboard the look is mostly brown (and a fair amount of red hair) with very fair skin and light eyes but in the south-west there seem to be a bigger element somewhat more darker eyes and skin that is less ultra-fair. Then again ive been to towns like Ennis on the middle part of the west coast where golden brown and dirty fair hair seemed very common. So I think the west-east division in Ireland is too simplistic.
    The paper by Lara Cassidy seems support this in the way of SW Ireland having a EEF heavy Beaker population during Bronze Age, possibly entering from the Atlantic facade. Instead of crypto-jews (yes this is quite a common argument on anthro boards when discussing the darker elements among britons) and that tired old Spanish Armada crap I'd say the major origin of these seemingly mediterranean elements are from Beaker tribes of western France. If we get some aDNA from BA France the picture is going to get much clearer of course.
    http://www.tara.tcd.ie/handle/2262/82960
    Haplotypic affinities and distributions of steppe-related introgression among samples suggest a potentially bimodal introduction of Beaker culture to the island from both Atlantic and Northern European sources, with southwestern individuals showing inflated levels of Neolithic ancestry relative to individualised burials from the north and east.

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  3. #12
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    According to the Irish DNA Atlas and the Insular Celtic paper, Ireland has genetic continuity with Britain though there is some degree of difference based on the amount of German-like admixture.

    All Irish have Scandinavian/northern Germanic admixture, which traces to the Viking age, as well as significant British ancestry which is highest, in roughly this order, in Northern Ireland, Leinster (east), northern Munster (southeast) and Connacht (west).

    Two regions of Ireland have greater genetic isolation and bottleneck and are more noticeably differentiated from Britain and these are the Catholic population of northwestern Ireland (Donegal and whereabouts) and the far southwest such as Cork and Kerry.

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  5. #13
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    At this point I've been able to prove my Grandfather O'Dwyer's (and my mother and I etc) descent from both Kilnamanagh and Wicklow Dwyers (many convicts in ended up in Australia and New South Wales and that is where many of our cousins come from - many from Tipperary and a John O'Dwyer convict from Cork and also a Cornelius/Connor O'Dwyer - they all ended up in Australia along with the Tellicherry Five etc!) via cousins who descend from both Captain Michael Dwyer and Lt. Hugh Vesty O'Byrne - those two men being first cousins (and sharing the O'Dwyer ancestry). Also Flemings from the Swan (family involved in the easter rising of 1916 - this Irish cousin is shared by myself and my Uncle etc) with O'Dwyer ancestry. The McGuire/Maguire (Grandfather's mother's family) was a bit of a mystery I have been since able to connect them to McGuires from Tralee in Kerry and before that Maguire of Fermanagh/Lurg... they relocated to Tralee after the failed rebellion in the 1600s. The McGuires mixed with the Clan Ranald MacDonalds in Ontario... all these connections and more (Hebrides and Highlands - lots of matches from Western Scotland both Jacobite and regular and Gaelic Irish) are all supported by both my results from FTDNA and Ancestry and my Uncle O'Dwyer's (just recently had him tested) and soon my mother's results!

    Anyway that side of the family is very dark both the O'Dwyers and McGuires as far as I know and see in pictures, though the pictures are black and white. My Grandfather is a direct descendant of those three Jacobite families (and an O'Dwyer from the Chiefly family etc and the Maguires were the Chiefly family of Fermanagh) as his mother was the McGuire from Ontario! Here is a picture of him - since we are discussing Irish and Gaelic Irish and appearances... he traces back to some very old families from both Gaelic Ireland and Scotland! 60945049_1475548035918560_5325375489848639488_n.jpg

    Edit: a picture of Grandfather Philip O'Dwyer's Grandfather McGuire from Ontario and a picture of me in front of O'Dwyers pub down in Kerry if I remember correctly: 8161_946725058698048_5863032708800950285_n.jpg 10406461_984118021625418_2374739504794992055_n.jpg

    2nd edit: I have recently discovered that the unit my 4th GGF Adam Weaver/Weber served with (Capt. John Chunn's Company of the US 17th Inf in the War of 1812) was at Lundy's Lane in Canada and in the 2nd Brigade that performed the bayonet charge on the British guns at the hilltop and fought off three counter attacks! He made it through the battles at Fort Erie also!!! I had never heard of the Battle of Lundy's Lane before that... many men from Pennsylvania (both Lutheran German and Scots-Irish in my ancestry) served in both the Revolution and War of 1812!
    Last edited by Bollox79; 05-20-2019 at 11:53 PM.
    Y-DNA: 4th GGF Adam Weaver born 1785 in Pennsylvania (most likely German) - Sergeant, US 17th Inf, War of 1812: R1b-U106-Z381-Z156-Z305/306/307-Z304-DF98-S1911-S1894/S1900-S4004/FGC14818/FGC14823-FGC14816/FGC14817 shared with 6drif-3!

    mtDNA: 3rd GGM Bridget Dana b. 1843 Ireland - T2b2b - Pagan Migrant Icelander SSG-A3 (grave 4?) - Sílastağir in Eyjafjarğarsısla, North Iceland is T2b2b. Relative of King Bela III of Hungary (his Y-DNA and autosomal kinsman buried near him had mtDNA T2b2b1)!

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  7. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by FionnSneachta View Post
    That's news to me! It must be a regional thing, possibly used more in places like Ulster where there is a larger Protestant population. I heard the term 'black Irish' but it likely was that I saw it on the internet rather than ever having heard it being said. Although if I recall correctly Maura Derrane originally from Connemara and with the dark brown hair, blue eyes and pale skin appearance was hoping to see some Spanish in her DNA results that were aired on the Late Late Show due to the story of the Spanish Armada. She was probably thinking that would explain her dark hair colour. My mum and I would have those general features as well actually. Of course, no Spanish percentage actually turned up in Maura's DNA, just some trace Scandinavia and Finland/Northwest Russia percentages like what I got in my original estimate. There are some with black hair, brown eyes and a darker complexion and those with just the browns eyes and dark hair but it's not the predominant appearance as you say. More than likely the Spanish Armada story arose among 'outsiders' as a way to explain why those Irish do have darker features than what's considered typical. It's most likely just due to natural variation within a population rather than there necessarily being a reason for it that can be attributed to any major event.

    Edit: The derogatory term actually reminded me of a recent conversation I had with some people from Clare. One of the girls was from England and had moved to Clare and it took her ages to adjust to the lingo. They were using phrases and I had no idea what they meant and they couldn't get over that I didn't know the meaning behind the phrases. There's actually a website on county slang for Ireland. I was looking at those for Roscommon and I knew the majority. I was particularly impressed that they had included 'All To One Side Like The Town Of Loughglynn' and 'From Out The Cloonchas' which are definitely unique to Roscommon since they refer to local places.
    Speaking of dna tests Colin Farrell came out 98.7% British & Irish on a 23&Me test.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ye9h...youtu.be&t=181

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  9. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jessie View Post
    Speaking of dna tests Colin Farrell came out 98.7% British & Irish on a 23&Me test.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ye9h...youtu.be&t=181
    I was surprised to see the naked Simpson and Jackson among his grandparents or great grandparents. They are most definitely British surnames.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alan View Post
    I I was surprised to see the naked Simpson and Jackson among his grandparents or great grandparents. They are most definitely British surnames.
    The families with those surnames may have been in Ireland for a long time at that stage though. His great grandparents at that stage may have had DNA that would appear Irish since those surnames only reflect one line (the paternal line). The mother of his grandmother Jackson was Carthy while the father's mother was Mooney so they weren't restricting themselves to people from Britain for marriage. It could be similar to people with Norman surnames like the Burkes. I wouldn't view them as less Irish or expect their DNA results to appear any less Irish. Not all the surnames in my family have an origin in Ireland such as Fleming, Knott, Giblin, Rodgers and Helbert. If they were primarily marrying Irish people, the English or Scottish origin would be diluted out. There are surnames in my area including Simpson, Irwin, Betagh, Satchwell, etc. that don't have an Irish origin but I expect that if they were DNA tested that they would get a very high Irish result like anyone in my family.
    Ancestry: Ireland (Paper trail ≅ 81.25% Roscommon, 12.5% Galway, 6.25% Mayo)
    Paternal ancestor (Y): Kelly b. c1830 in Co. Roscommon (Uí Maine)
    Father's mtDNA: Fleming b. c1831 in Co. Roscommon (H27e1)
    Maternal ancestor (mt): McDermott b. c1814 in Co. Roscommon
    Paternal great grandfather (mt): Connella b. c1798 in Co. Roscommon (T2a1a8)

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  12. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by FionnSneachta View Post
    The families with those surnames may have been in Ireland for a long time at that stage though. His great grandparents at that stage may have had DNA that would appear Irish since those surnames only reflect one line (the paternal line). The mother of his grandmother Jackson was Carthy while the father's mother was Mooney so they weren't restricting themselves to people from Britain for marriage. It could be similar to people with Norman surnames like the Burkes. I wouldn't view them as less Irish or expect their DNA results to appear any less Irish. Not all the surnames in my family have an origin in Ireland such as Fleming, Knott, Giblin, Rodgers and Helbert. If they were primarily marrying Irish people, the English or Scottish origin would be diluted out. There are surnames in my area including Simpson, Irwin, Betagh, Satchwell, etc. that don't have an Irish origin but I expect that if they were DNA tested that they would get a very high Irish result like anyone in my family.
    FionnSneachta,

    I might have asked before - but where do you Flemings come from in Ireland - that being a rebel family from the the Swan etc - my mother's side has a connection to an Irish cousin Fleming from the Swan etc: I have also been able to connect via my and my Uncle's results - our connection to the Irish Rebel family of the Flemings from the Swan and county Laois... via cousin clustering and this ancestry for that shared cousin: Fleming, Whelan, Brennan, Green, O'Dwyer, Murray, The Swan and Wolfhill Ballyadams (Laois --Kilkenny).

    Also I have been able to confirm our connection to both Kilnamanagh (Tipperary mainly, but from Clare and Cork etc also - John O'Dwyer convict from Cork, Cornelius/Connor O'Dwyer - John O'Dwyer Capt. Michael's father - also the surnames of the traditional families and allies of the O'Dwyers show up in my distant matches and should be a generation closer in both my Uncle's and Mother's results - Purcell, McCarthy, Butler, Fitzgerald etc) O'Dwyers and convicts along with Wicklow rebel Capt. Michael Dwyer and Lt. Hugh Vesty O'Byrne (they were 1st cousins related through the O'Dwyers) through my cousins from New South Wales. Also I have been able to confirm that my McGuires (Maguires) were from Tralee in Kerry and before that Maguire of Lurg from Fermanagh via cousin matches (I get a ton of those Maguire/McGuire matches - they turned up in early Virginia and other colonies also - one Lt. Felix McGuire dying in an ambush in one of the last battles of our American Revolution - he was fighting along side Col. Daniel Boone who made it out of that ambush)... my particular McGuire line was from Ontario via probably Kerry and married with Clan Ranald MacDonalds, MacAulays with lots of Jacobite Highland ancestry there confirmed via cousin matching - in particular MacDonald of South Uist and Barra - Morar, Benecula and Milton (Flora MacDonald's family)... MacNeils of Barra and Fraser of the Western Highlands/Hebrides and many more!! Jacobites stuck together ;-)!

    Edit: Concerning surnames that were not originally Irish - but became and remained Catholic and fought on the Jacobite side - many Hiberno-Norman families such as Butler and Fitzgerald were there for a long time and became as Irish as any local right! One of my projects is to rebuild some of these family trees on my Ancestry account - or at least add them to it... the traditional genealogy etc.

    Beir Bua,
    Charlie (Cathal Dubh - I have dark brown/black hair and eyes like my mother's O'Dwyer side... though it's starting to go grey hah)...
    Last edited by Bollox79; 05-25-2019 at 09:50 PM.
    Y-DNA: 4th GGF Adam Weaver born 1785 in Pennsylvania (most likely German) - Sergeant, US 17th Inf, War of 1812: R1b-U106-Z381-Z156-Z305/306/307-Z304-DF98-S1911-S1894/S1900-S4004/FGC14818/FGC14823-FGC14816/FGC14817 shared with 6drif-3!

    mtDNA: 3rd GGM Bridget Dana b. 1843 Ireland - T2b2b - Pagan Migrant Icelander SSG-A3 (grave 4?) - Sílastağir in Eyjafjarğarsısla, North Iceland is T2b2b. Relative of King Bela III of Hungary (his Y-DNA and autosomal kinsman buried near him had mtDNA T2b2b1)!

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  14. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bollox79 View Post
    FionnSneachta,

    I might have asked before - but where do you Flemings come from in Ireland - that being a rebel family from the the Swan etc - my mother's side has a connection to an Irish cousin Fleming from the Swan etc: I have also been able to connect via my and my Uncle's results - our connection to the Irish Rebel family of the Flemings from the Swan and county Laois... via cousin clustering and this ancestry for that shared cousin: Fleming, Whelan, Brennan, Green, O'Dwyer, Murray, The Swan and Wolfhill Ballyadams (Laois --Kilkenny).

    Also I have been able to confirm our connection to both Kilnamanagh (Tipperary mainly, but from Clare and Cork etc also - John O'Dwyer convict from Cork, Cornelius/Connor O'Dwyer - John O'Dwyer Capt. Michael's father - also the surnames of the traditional families and allies of the O'Dwyers show up in my distant matches and should be a generation closer in both my Uncle's and Mother's results - Purcell, McCarthy, Butler, Fitzgerald etc) O'Dwyers and convicts along with Wicklow rebel Capt. Michael Dwyer and Lt. Hugh Vesty O'Byrne (they were 1st cousins related through the O'Dwyers) through my cousins from New South Wales. Also I have been able to confirm that my McGuires (Maguires) were from Tralee in Kerry and before that Maguire of Lurg from Fermanagh via cousin matches (I get a ton of those Maguire/McGuire matches - they turned up in early Virginia and other colonies also - one Lt. Felix McGuire dying in an ambush in one of the last battles of our American Revolution - he was fighting along side Col. Daniel Boone who made it out of that ambush)... my particular McGuire line was from Ontario via probably Kerry and married with Clan Ranald MacDonalds, MacAulays with lots of Jacobite Highland ancestry there confirmed via cousin matching - in particular MacDonald of South Uist and Barra - Morar, Benecula and Milton (Flora MacDonald's family)... MacNeils of Barra and Fraser of the Western Highlands/Hebrides and many more!! Jacobites stuck together ;-)!

    Edit: Concerning surnames that were not originally Irish - but became and remained Catholic and fought on the Jacobite side - many Hiberno-Norman families such as Butler and Fitzgerald were there for a long time and became as Irish as any local right! One of my projects is to rebuild some of these family trees on my Ancestry account - or at least add them to it... the traditional genealogy etc.

    Beir Bua,
    Charlie (Cathal Dubh - I have dark brown/black hair and eyes like my mother's O'Dwyer side... though it's starting to go grey hah)...
    You're right that many Hiberno-Norman families have been in Ireland for such a long time that they have become as Irish as any local. My Flemings were originally from near Ballinlough in Co. Roscommon which isn't far from Mayo or Galway. They didn't have any rebel ties that I'm aware of. They did unlawfully retake possession of their property in 1898 after they were evicted. My 3rd great grandfather had died in 1879 when he was about 50 from bronchitis so that probably contributed to the eviction. It was his widow and three youngest children who took back the house. After the bailiff and police left, someone saw the mother aged about 67 partly in on the window, the son shoved her in and she opened the door to let them all in and continued to reside there. They were brought to court by the man who bought the premises which resulted in the eviction but they must have been forced to leave since by 1901 the mother was living with her daughter, son-in-law and grandchildren. There's no sign of the other children in the same census so I don't know what happened to them. They were possibly arrested. There's no sign of the man who reported them either in 1901.

    I have a book on the area with the following mentioned about the Normans but it's generic enough.
    The Normans came in great numbers, stayed in great numbers and during the Middle Ages began to exercise influence and control over the whole country. Norman castles began to appear everywhere. Norman names are very numerous in this area as they are in cities and towns. They include Fitzgerald, Fitzpatrick, Fitzmaurice, Walsh, Hussey, Tyrell, Dillon and the majority of these families continue to reside in the area.

    The penetration by the Normans into Connacht was far more significant than that of the Norsemen. The Normans brought a greater sense of organisation, administration and order than ever had been experienced before. In addition, they brought new techniques of agriculture and established villages based on the manor system. Although the Norman control of lands west of the Shannon was significant, at the same time it was partial and incomplete. The area around Ballinlough would appear to have been relatively immune from Norman influence. However, as already indicated there were plenty of families around that carried Norman blood in their veins. The Normans had a significant influence on the reorganisation of the Irish Church.
    The O'Flynn family controlled the land around Ballinlough and had a castle there until the time of Cromwell.

    Edit: Actually my Flemings do seem to have had some Nationalist links. I found a New York newspaper article stating the following:
    On Jan 1 a meeting of the surrounding districts was held to consider what action should be taken as to the eviction of Mr. Fleming and his mother from the farm which has been in the hands of that family for generations. Mr. Arthur O'Connor, the Palace, Elphin, is the landlord, but the eviction was carried out at the insistence of Mr. Thomas Farragher, of the County Mayo. A long letter from Mr. O'Connor, the landlard, to Mr. Farragher, Ballyhaunis, and a copy of which was sent to Mr. Fleming was read in which it was mentioned that if he, as a landlord, did half as much in buying out other people's debts and evicting families, he would be billed all over Ireland. Addresses having been delivered as to the necessity of action in Mr. Fleming's case to have him out back in the old homestead, and to Mr. Fleming's connection and services in the cause of Irish Nationality in the past, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted "Resolved. That we the Nationalists of the parish of Kiltullagh and surrounding districts, in public meeting assembled, have heard an explanation of the case of the harsh eviction of Mr. Fleming and his mother, condemn in the strongest terms the action of those instrumental in having them evicted, and the continued obduracy in refusing to come to a settlement as to the real ownership of the farm. That we appeal to all Nationalists in the surrounding districts and also to all Nationalists abroad for help to enable Mr. Fleming to fight his cause, and to sustain him and his family in their efforts to regain the old home and farm, and that in the mean time we pledge ourselves to erect a new house for him until he gets back his own."
    Last edited by FionnSneachta; 05-26-2019 at 06:46 PM.
    Ancestry: Ireland (Paper trail ≅ 81.25% Roscommon, 12.5% Galway, 6.25% Mayo)
    Paternal ancestor (Y): Kelly b. c1830 in Co. Roscommon (Uí Maine)
    Father's mtDNA: Fleming b. c1831 in Co. Roscommon (H27e1)
    Maternal ancestor (mt): McDermott b. c1814 in Co. Roscommon
    Paternal great grandfather (mt): Connella b. c1798 in Co. Roscommon (T2a1a8)

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  16. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by FionnSneachta View Post
    You're right that many Hiberno-Norman families have been in Ireland for such a long time that they have become as Irish as any local. My Flemings were originally from near Ballinlough in Co. Roscommon which isn't far from Mayo or Galway. They didn't have any rebel ties that I'm aware of. They did unlawfully retake possession of their property in 1898 after they were evicted. My 3rd great grandfather had died in 1879 when he was about 50 from bronchitis so that probably contributed to the eviction. It was his widow and three youngest children who took back the house. After the bailiff and police left, someone saw the mother aged about 67 partly in on the window, the son shoved her in and she opened the door to let them all in and continued to reside there. They were brought to court by the man who bought the premises which resulted in the eviction but they must have been forced to leave since by 1901 the mother was living with her daughter, son-in-law and grandchildren. There's no sign of the other children in the same census so I don't know what happened to them. They were possibly arrested. There's no sign of the man who reported them either in 1901.

    I have a book on the area with the following mentioned about the Normans but it's generic enough.


    The O'Flynn family controlled the land around Ballinlough and had a castle there until the time of Cromwell.

    Edit: Actually my Flemings do seem to have had some Nationalist links. I found a New York newspaper article stating the following:
    Thanks for detailed response! Yes I'd say the Flemings are a family with strong Nationalist connections - as you are finding in your ancestor's area and I had stumbled upon my Irish Fleming cousin from the Swan while researching Captain Michael Dwyer and Lt. Hugh Vestry O'Byrne (I have a cousin each of direct descent from those two from New South Wales and our common ancestors among us all being O'Dwyer - Capt. Dwyer and Lt. Byrne being first cousins) and noticed they were involved down there also! I have a feeling that at least in Gaelic Ireland these families who shared the surname from 1000 (and especially 1500-1600s) are all related, intermarried, and also intermarried to Norman families and native Gaelic nobility. The reason I think so (in my family tree and in yours also as you have all your ancestry from over there!) is that I do see the surnames of the traditional family surnames showing up in my results, my Uncle O'Dwyer's and soon my mother's results (I need to send them in!)... in that even though I have yet to pin down the exact line of descent for my 3rd GGF Philip O'Dwyer (last Chief of the O'Duibhirs was Philip O'Dwyer of previous gen or two) - was he a direct descendant of the last Chief or a son of another branch/sept, but same family? Records being burned up/destroyed I may only be able to figure that out with enough Y-DNA testing which I plan on doing for my Uncle O'Dwyer in conjunction with that Y-DNA project and the Laigin tribe etc (O'Ryans and O'Gormans and some McCarthys show up in that Y-DNA line)... ok anyway I see Fitzgerald, lots of Butler, Purcell, and McCarthy showing up a lot. In my Maguire line (basically confirmed via the James Maguire who either he or his father or GF (seems to be some debate on exactly who did - but I am 100% sure it's the same family as all the cousin matching supports that line of descent)... spent some time in Tralee (that is another reason I get both Munster and Leinster in my Ancestry communities - makes sense since my McGuire was recent from Ireland to Ontario and they would show up down South there etc) and headed over to the Colonies and Ontario etc. Those Maguires both Conner Roe Maguire who sided on the loyalist side (shame on him) and Hugh who of course he fought on the rebel side - they married many times with the O'Neills and I see those surnames showing up quite often in my cousin matches...

    I suppose the whole point to that paragraph is that there is the tradition of these Gaelic and Hiberno-Norman families "keeping it in the family" so-to-speak and at first I wondered if it's just tradition and not necessarily true - but the DNA matching and clustering looks very likely to support it... so chances are your Flemings are the same as my Flemings etc ;-)... It had pleased me to no end to prove through DNA research my Grandfather O'Dwyer being a descendant of O'Dwyer and allied familes on his father's side and a descendant of the Maguire and allied families on his mother's side!! Only wish I could have met him! I do much of this research in honor of Mom and her family!!!

    P.S. I'm glad your ancestors got back in their house (even if it was not permanent - I know my mother's Hayes and O'Hanrahans came over the first few years of the famine - tough times indeed)... if all our ancestors over there have something in common it's we fought for what we had ;-)...

    Beir bua,
    Charlie (Cathal Dubh)
    Last edited by Bollox79; 05-27-2019 at 01:30 AM.
    Y-DNA: 4th GGF Adam Weaver born 1785 in Pennsylvania (most likely German) - Sergeant, US 17th Inf, War of 1812: R1b-U106-Z381-Z156-Z305/306/307-Z304-DF98-S1911-S1894/S1900-S4004/FGC14818/FGC14823-FGC14816/FGC14817 shared with 6drif-3!

    mtDNA: 3rd GGM Bridget Dana b. 1843 Ireland - T2b2b - Pagan Migrant Icelander SSG-A3 (grave 4?) - Sílastağir in Eyjafjarğarsısla, North Iceland is T2b2b. Relative of King Bela III of Hungary (his Y-DNA and autosomal kinsman buried near him had mtDNA T2b2b1)!

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  18. #20
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    Nationality
    Irish
    Y-DNA
    R-BY3440-Y160102
    mtDNA
    H6a1b2f

    Ireland
    Quote Originally Posted by Bollox79 View Post
    I have a feeling that at least in Gaelic Ireland these families who shared the surname from 1000 (and especially 1500-1600s) are all related, intermarried, and also intermarried to Norman families and native Gaelic nobility.
    Interesting you should say that since my 3rd great grandparents were both Flemings. I don't if they were connected going back or were two different families but it is possible that they were related at some point. Looking at the Fleming Y-DNA project, there appears to be a few Fleming groups in Ireland. It is possible that most are of the same paternal line in Ireland but some more recent immigrants have created more groups. You've triggered an interest in that side of the family for me now.
    Last edited by FionnSneachta; 05-27-2019 at 07:38 PM.
    Ancestry: Ireland (Paper trail ≅ 81.25% Roscommon, 12.5% Galway, 6.25% Mayo)
    Paternal ancestor (Y): Kelly b. c1830 in Co. Roscommon (Uí Maine)
    Father's mtDNA: Fleming b. c1831 in Co. Roscommon (H27e1)
    Maternal ancestor (mt): McDermott b. c1814 in Co. Roscommon
    Paternal great grandfather (mt): Connella b. c1798 in Co. Roscommon (T2a1a8)

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to FionnSneachta For This Useful Post:

     Bollox79 (05-28-2019)

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