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Thread: What is your body fat percentage?

  1. #41
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    Let me put some weight in the discussion, no not in body fat

    Some interpretation about skanomodu, google translated:

    'On a golden coin from around 600 AD the word skanomodu can be read in beautiful Germanic ruins. Most scholars agree on the significance and it is generally accepted that this is a Frisian proper name, making it one of the oldest traces of the Frisian language. It is for this reason that, among other things, the study association of the Frisian Language and Culture study program at the University of Groningen is named after it. But with the danger of grieving this kind people: with some right we can doubt the interpretation of the name and ask ourselves if he really is Frisian.

    It is said that the coin was taken over by the British Museum in 1824 from the collection of King George III of the United Kingdom, who died four years earlier. How it once came into his possession is uncertain, but since he was also Elector and later King of Hanover, the coin might as well have its origins in those regions, including East Frisia. In any case, it is clear that it was used as a pendant and was modeled on the example of late Roman solidi from two centuries earlier. Apart from the rust bars then.

    Skanomodu is considered to be a dual name. The first paragraph would be a younger form of Old German * skaun (ij) a- 'beautiful, beautiful' and the second paragraph a younger form of * mōda- 'courage, mind' or adjective 'courageous, of mind', meaning the name as a whole it would mean something like 'good-natured'. And because the development of the Old German * -au- into a long -a (or an -ā-) is characteristic of the Old Frisian, the name is read as Skānomōdu and thus considered Frisian.

    These are reasonable assumptions, but it is possible that the first paragraph is a very different word, and an adjective that has been overlooked earlier because it is now quite rare: Old German * skana-. It is only left in the English regional languages, in the form of shan and extended also shanny and shandy. Its written meaning varies from "shy, frightened, wild" (said of cattle) and "unruly" to "frisky" and even "frivolous".

    Derived from this is to shan, which in one region means "jumping sideways", in another "walking wide leg", and in both cases horses are said. This verb has its counterpart in Frisian skane, skeane "stand wide-legged". In view of the related words, the latter two meanings will have shifted from being "braced, being stiff," originally with fright or fear.

    Himself is * skana-derived from the strong verb * skenan- that still lives on as Swedish skena, mainly in the meanings of 'frightening madman' (said of horses) and 'running, raging, whether or not aimlessly' (said of people). In addition, we find the verb * skun-n-, the precursor of Old English scunian, sceonian "to be afraid, to fear, to shun from fear, to shun" and English to shun to "shun, to shun". The latter word also has the meaning "push, poke".

    That this * skenan must have originally meant "excitement" and "being stimulated" is all the more evident from another derivation: * skunda, which has been reported as Middle Low German, excites "excitement, incitement, lure". * Skunda (*) is then derived from * skunda, which initially also meant 'excitement' and 'being stimulated' and was handed down as Old English scyndan 'rushing', Old-Saxon skundian 'spurring' and Groning's 'persuading' .

    Eventually * skenan himself, including Greek ξαίνω (ksanō), ‘carding, scratching, scratching’ goes back to the Proto-Indo-European root * ksen-. This is probably an extension of the older root * kes- "carding, combing", which is also the basis of Dutch hair and the like. The reversal of * sk- from parent * ks is incidentally sound-lawful. For this, compare the development of Old German * skeuban "push, push" from Proto-Indo-European * kseubh–.

    To return to * skana-: given traditions, distractions and relatives, it seems to have originally meant 'stimulated' and by extension 'frightened' and 'shy', but also 'wild', 'unruly' and 'stiff' ". If we are then allowed to identify the word with the first member of Skanomodu, then this composition could perhaps best be interpreted as "stubborn of mind" or simply "stiff".

    But the joke is now: if this interpretation is correct, then the name could be English as well as Frisian. Although it is conceivable in view of the close relationship between English and Frisian that the average, skanomodu Frisian is not concerned about this.'

    https://taaldacht.nl/2016/04/09/skanomodu/

    This one is even more accurat for Spruithean as he has Westeremden roots, this is 8th century rune from Westeremden :


    It says:
    ophmu givda mlu:iwi ok upduna (a)le wimv h us.
    op hmu jibada mlu : iwi ok up duna (a)le wimœd h usa.

    ‘at the homestead stays good fortune; may it also grow near the yew on the terp; Wimœd owns this’

    Ok more straightforward than skanomodu, this stays as mysterious as my body fat.....

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Finn For This Useful Post:

     JMcB (06-20-2019),  spruithean (06-26-2019)

  3. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finn View Post
    Let me put some weight in the discussion, no not in body fat

    Some interpretation about skanomodu, google translated:

    'On a golden coin from around 600 AD the word skanomodu can be read in beautiful Germanic ruins. Most scholars agree on the significance and it is generally accepted that this is a Frisian proper name, making it one of the oldest traces of the Frisian language. It is for this reason that, among other things, the study association of the Frisian Language and Culture study program at the University of Groningen is named after it. But with the danger of grieving this kind people: with some right we can doubt the interpretation of the name and ask ourselves if he really is Frisian.

    It is said that the coin was taken over by the British Museum in 1824 from the collection of King George III of the United Kingdom, who died four years earlier. How it once came into his possession is uncertain, but since he was also Elector and later King of Hanover, the coin might as well have its origins in those regions, including East Frisia. In any case, it is clear that it was used as a pendant and was modeled on the example of late Roman solidi from two centuries earlier. Apart from the rust bars then.

    Skanomodu is considered to be a dual name. The first paragraph would be a younger form of Old German * skaun (ij) a- 'beautiful, beautiful' and the second paragraph a younger form of * mōda- 'courage, mind' or adjective 'courageous, of mind', meaning the name as a whole it would mean something like 'good-natured'. And because the development of the Old German * -au- into a long -a (or an -ā-) is characteristic of the Old Frisian, the name is read as Skānomōdu and thus considered Frisian.

    These are reasonable assumptions, but it is possible that the first paragraph is a very different word, and an adjective that has been overlooked earlier because it is now quite rare: Old German * skana-. It is only left in the English regional languages, in the form of shan and extended also shanny and shandy. Its written meaning varies from "shy, frightened, wild" (said of cattle) and "unruly" to "frisky" and even "frivolous".

    Derived from this is to shan, which in one region means "jumping sideways", in another "walking wide leg", and in both cases horses are said. This verb has its counterpart in Frisian skane, skeane "stand wide-legged". In view of the related words, the latter two meanings will have shifted from being "braced, being stiff," originally with fright or fear.

    Himself is * skana-derived from the strong verb * skenan- that still lives on as Swedish skena, mainly in the meanings of 'frightening madman' (said of horses) and 'running, raging, whether or not aimlessly' (said of people). In addition, we find the verb * skun-n-, the precursor of Old English scunian, sceonian "to be afraid, to fear, to shun from fear, to shun" and English to shun to "shun, to shun". The latter word also has the meaning "push, poke".

    That this * skenan must have originally meant "excitement" and "being stimulated" is all the more evident from another derivation: * skunda, which has been reported as Middle Low German, excites "excitement, incitement, lure". * Skunda (*) is then derived from * skunda, which initially also meant 'excitement' and 'being stimulated' and was handed down as Old English scyndan 'rushing', Old-Saxon skundian 'spurring' and Groning's 'persuading' .

    Eventually * skenan himself, including Greek ξαίνω (ksanō), ‘carding, scratching, scratching’ goes back to the Proto-Indo-European root * ksen-. This is probably an extension of the older root * kes- "carding, combing", which is also the basis of Dutch hair and the like. The reversal of * sk- from parent * ks is incidentally sound-lawful. For this, compare the development of Old German * skeuban "push, push" from Proto-Indo-European * kseubh–.

    To return to * skana-: given traditions, distractions and relatives, it seems to have originally meant 'stimulated' and by extension 'frightened' and 'shy', but also 'wild', 'unruly' and 'stiff' ". If we are then allowed to identify the word with the first member of Skanomodu, then this composition could perhaps best be interpreted as "stubborn of mind" or simply "stiff".

    But the joke is now: if this interpretation is correct, then the name could be English as well as Frisian. Although it is conceivable in view of the close relationship between English and Frisian that the average, skanomodu Frisian is not concerned about this.'

    https://taaldacht.nl/2016/04/09/skanomodu/

    This one is even more accurat for Spruithean as he has Westeremden roots, this is 8th century rune from Westeremden :


    It says:
    ophmu givda mlu:iwi ok upduna (a)le wimv h us.
    op hmu jibada mlu : iwi ok up duna (a)le wimœd h usa.

    ‘at the homestead stays good fortune; may it also grow near the yew on the terp; Wimœd owns this’

    Ok more straightforward than skanomodu, this stays as mysterious as my body fat.....
    That’s putting some meat on the bones! ;-)
    Known Paper Trail: 45.3% English, 29.7% Scottish, 12.5% Irish, 6.25% German & 6.25% Italian. Or: 87.5% British Isles, 6.25% German & 6.25% Italian.
    LivingDNA: 88.1% British Isles (59.7% English, 27% Scottish & 1.3% Irish), 5.9% Europe South (Aegian 3.4%, Tuscany 1.3%, Sardinia 1.1%), 4.4% Europe NW (Scandinavia) & 1.6% Europe East, (Mordovia).
    FT Big Y: I1-Z140 branch I-F2642 >Y1966 >Y3649 >A13241 >Y3647 >A13248 (circa 620 AD) >A13242/YSEQ (circa 765 AD) >A13252/YSEQ (circa 1630 AD).

  4. #43
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    15%, 173 lbs at 187 cm. Trying to get to 185 lbs, then drop to 10% bodyfat with adequate muscle.

  5. #44
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    No idea, but I'm 6'0, 160 lbs. This time last year I was pushing 215 lbs. It's amazing what stopping drinking beer can do for you. When I did go back to the bar more regularly I switched to vodka waters.

  6. #45
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    7.0% bf. I’m 31, an even 6 feet and weigh about 115 lbs. I’ve actually been trying to get fat on beer, but my metabolism is just too fast. I try to lift when my back injury allows it, but all the gains I make I loose like 2 weeks after my disk goes out. I’m an ftDNA customer but I’ve been wondering if 23&Me or any of the other companies offer a test that could help me choose a healthier diet. Does anyone have any experience with any of these tests and what their prices are?

  7. #46
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    some info:


    ...

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to shazou For This Useful Post:

     JMcB (07-06-2019)

  9. #47
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    I think ~18%. Most of my life I was more than that. I think I will try to be between 12% and 15%.

    I was more than 25% for like a year or so and I felt very bad.

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