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Thread: Medieval Albanian Placenames/Settlements in Kosovo & Serbia 13-15th Century

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    Medieval Albanian Placenames/Settlements in Kosovo & Serbia 13-15th Century

    As recorded in Slavic & Ottoman tax, land, etc, registries during the 13th-15th Centuries. Neatly falsifies the sci-fi propaganda that Albanians supposedly are late migrants into Kosovo during the ottoman empire.

    This is priceless information for anybody with Ev13, J2b2-l283, balkan origins, etc.

    Many myths were constructed by propaganda divisions of the 19th and 20th century colonization projects that Serbia had. If we wish to understand our past truthfully we need to annihilate myths like those.

    Milan Sufflay, a croatian jewish scientist, was murdered by Serbian special agents for researching Albanian history, and his codex albanicus was stolen, and still has not been released ever by the Serbian state. This is a sign that we will not be getting anything of the truth about balkan history from a state like Serbia, so academic work like the research below is paramount if we're to get anywhere.

    There is yet to be an in depth scientific study on Albanian orthodoxy in Kosovo, Serbia, Bulgaria, etc. Note the monasteries registered like for example "Sveti Arbanash".

    The Map:

     



    Direct link to the map: https://i.imgur.com/S8aVnQ0.jpg

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    Something further interesting is the visible assimilation of Albanians into the serbian ethnos. In Chrysobulls and Ottoman registries of names of households, we observe the sons with slavic names like "Bogoslav" while the father has a typical albanian name like "Arbanas", etc.

    See below:

    "Process of Slavicization of the traditional Albanian onomastic, was to a
    great extent given Slav characteristics, first during Bulgarian medieval and
    then Serb rule, especially during the rule of Serbian kings, Milutin, Dushan,
    and Urosh. For this reason, many Slav scholars have considered Albanians
    who had typical Slavic names as Slav-Orthodox from ethnic aspect, but in
    essence in the ethnic-language aspect, they were Orthodox Albanians and
    not of a Slav origin.

    As it is already stated in the very beginning of the preface, to
    approxima- tely determine ethnic origin of the head of the families who were
    registered in the Ottoman registries (but not the ethnic structure with
    percentage), only for the head of the families with Albanian origin who had
    traditional and characteristic Albanian names, in symbiosis with Slavic and
    Christian names, the same time who had diferently names with Albanian
    lingvistc forms ending with vowels- i and - a, we have used this methodology:

    -According to the Slav and Christian names of the head of the family
    which were in symbioses or of a family origin (related) to Albanian patronims, like: Stepan, son of Bardo-s (Bardhi), Jovan, son of Ulku-t (Ujku),
    Boja, son of Ulkash, Stojani, son of Dashi, Bozhidar, son of Guri, Radislav,
    son of Luli, Milosh son of Luli-, Bogdan, son of Malja-s, Dobrashin son of
    Zguri, Nikolla, son of Rrapi, Andre, son of Zognos-, etc.

    - According to the names of the head of the families who had typical
    Slav names, but surnames of the tribe, fraternities and flood related: Milosh,
    son of Berisha, Radoslav, son of Berisha, Bozhidar, brother of, Rodonja,
    son of Berisha, Ivan, son of Mazrek, Radica, his son, Radislav, son of Mazrek, Ivan, son of Muzaka, Radosavi, son of Muzaka, Jovan, son of Krasniē,
    Jovan son of Lika-s, Nikola, son of Shaliē, Radislav , son of Progon, etc.

    - According to the Slav and Christian name of the head of the families
    who were blood related with older traditional and characteristic Albanian
    names: Branko, son of Gjon, Radica, son of Gjon, Radosav, son of Gjon,
    Nikola, son of Radiē, Petri, son of Gjon, Vuk, son of Gjonash, Dabzhiv, son
    of Gjin, Andrej, son of Radoslav, son of Andreja-s (Leshit), Bogdan, son of
    Gjin, Jova, son of Gjinoviq, Dabzhiv, son of Doēi, Mihal, son of Leka, Radko, son of Tanush, Radoslav, son of Prnd-i, Gjurgji, son of Tanush, Stepan
    son of Tolja, Bozhidar son of Jaka, etc.

    - According to the calendric names, Christian in Albanian forms, or the
    ones that had indefinite articles or suffixes- i and -a, also ush and esh of the
    Albanian language, without taking into consideration origin of the name or
    the surname: Peter Mati, Dimiter Petri, Andreja Petri, Aleksi, Dimitri Spani,
    Niko Petri, Pavel Aleksi, Dimitri Nikolla: Andreja, Biba, Bic, Bili, Bilja, Bulesh,
    Boja, Bojk-Bojki, Bat-Batush, But-Butko, Bulesh, Daba, Dobri, Daka, Deda,
    Deja, Dida, Dobra, Doda, Doka, Draga, Dragush,Dosa, Duka, Gaci, Gega,
    Daka, Geci, Gika, Gjika, Guri, Guro, Gjurgji, Gjorgji, Gjuresh, Gjurk, Gjergji
    Jako, Jaka Jan, Jano, Jon, Kata, Kolja-Nikola, Lazor- Lazer, Leka, Lika, Lekash, Leshi, Leshan, Leshjan, Lul, Lulash Mal-Malja, Mil,-Mili, Mihal, Milush
    Mana, Manuel, Mara, Marin, Martin-Marash, Mati,Mata, Mateja, Mirash,
    Mirush Niko, Nika, , Nikashin, Nua, Ndua, Noka, Nokaē, Prenk-Prend,Pepa,
    Petra, Pava, Pal, Pulja, Pavel, Peci-Peca, Puta, Puka, Radi, Rad, Rada,
    Rajk, Rajki, Stajk-Stajki ,Stepa,Steja, Tan,Tom-Toma, Tun-Tuna, TushaTushko,Vaso, Vasa, Vladi, Vllashi, Voka,Vuka, etc.

    -According to the etnonim – popular names, like: Bogdan, son of
    Arbanas, Jovan, son of Arbanas, Bogoslav, son of Arbanash, Milosh, son of
    Arbanas, Stanisha, son of Aarbanash, Cvetko, son of Arbanas, Novak, son
    of Arnaut, Milosh, son of Arnaut, Novak son of Arnaut, Jorgi-Jorgji, son of
    Arvaniti, Hristo son of Arvaniti, etc. - According the names of neighborhood
    and settlements: Radoslav Bardoniē, Vukashin, son of Makromal, Vuk, son
    of Makromal, Nenada, son of Makromal, Dragoslav and Dragosh, sons of
    Bogoje, their grandfather Kurikuē,(Gurikuq), Hlapi, son of Guribardiē, (Gurbardhi). Marko,son of Guri-Ziē (Gurizi)

    Source: "Regjistrimi i vendbanimeve dhe i popullsisė albane tė Kosovės : (sipas defterėve osmanė tė shekullit XV)"

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    This assimilation process visible in records explains why south serbs have more typical Albanian haplogroups like ev13 and j2b2 and less I2a-slav.

    We observe a similar process on the sanxhak bosnians, who are muslim albanians that assimilated into bosnian muslims. They also have entirely albanian haplos unlike bosnians proper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johane Derite View Post
    This assimilation process visible in records explains why south serbs have more typical Albanian haplogroups like ev13 and j2b2 and less I2a-slav.
    Here's a quick comparison of E-V13, R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 among Albanians and Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija. Serbian sample is from ongoing testing of Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija, Albanian sample is taken from your project gjenetika.com/statistikat.

    ksm.PNG

    As you can see, even though E-V13 percentage among Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija is indeed much above Serbian average (by some ~50%), and is almost comparable to percentage among Albanians, R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 are not even close, in fact they are barely above Serbian average. It's funny how one simple table made your "assimilation process" fantasy null and void. Or are you saying Serbs were assimilating almost exclusively E-V13 Albanians, and rarely to almost never R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 Albanians? Such disproportion is clear indicator E-V13 is not "typical Albanian haplogroup" as you said, it is Paleo-Balkan haplogroup which is clearly older on the territory of Kosovo and Metohija than "typical Albanian haplogroups" R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283. E-V13 probably was a major haplogroup among ancient Dardanians, which were later romanized and gradually became known as Vlachs during Late Antiquity and Early Medieval period. Those are the same Vlachs known from medieval Serbian sources, which were assimilated during medieval times by Serbs, and later by Albanians. On the other hand, great mayority of R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 Albanians are relatively late (medieval & modern) newcomers to Kosovo and Metohija from North Albania, and most of them know even today when and from which North Albanian tribe/fis they came.

    Also, "Slavic" I2-Y3120 among Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija is just 2% below Serbian average (32%:34%), and R1a is 2,5% below (12,5%:15%).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pribislav View Post
    Here's a quick comparison of E-V13, R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 among Albanians and Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija. Serbian sample is from ongoing testing of Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija, Albanian sample is taken from your project gjenetika.com/statistikat.

    ksm.PNG

    As you can see, even though E-V13 percentage among Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija is indeed much above Serbian average (by some ~50%), and is almost comparable to percentage among Albanians, R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 are not even close, in fact they are barely above Serbian average. It's funny how one simple table made your "assimilation process" fantasy null and void. Or are you saying Serbs were assimilating almost exclusively E-V13 Albanians, and rarely to almost never R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 Albanians? Such disproportion is clear indicator E-V13 is not "typical Albanian haplogroup" as you said, it is Paleo-Balkan haplogroup which is clearly older on the territory of Kosovo and Metohija than "typical Albanian haplogroups" R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283. E-V13 probably was a major haplogroup among ancient Dardanians, which were later romanized and gradually became known as Vlachs during Late Antiquity and Early Medieval period. Those are the same Vlachs known from medieval Serbian sources, which were assimilated during medieval times by Serbs, and later by Albanians. On the other hand, great mayority of R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 Albanians are relatively late (medieval & modern) newcomers to Kosovo and Metohija from North Albania, and most of them know even today when and from which North Albanian tribe/fis they came.

    Also, "Slavic" I2-Y3120 among Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija is just 2% below Serbian average (32%:34%), and R1a is 2,5% below (12,5%:15%).
    Read the map. You have Sveti Arbanash monastery registered north-east of the Republic of Kosovo's territory today (doesnt exist anymore). You have "berishanė" all the way near Nish. You have another "berisha" toponym on the border with Kurshumliya. Meaning there was tribal movements way before ottomans to get that north. (berisha is oldest thus far recorded Alb clan).

    Car dushan mentions Berisha's field in Kosovo:



    And I didn't claim all serbs are alb-assimilants if thats what you are insinuating. I said south serbs have higher Albanian related y-dna haplos, which is true and you know that. There were more Albanians than vlachs in KS, so you are almost there with your analysis.
    Last edited by Johane Derite; 07-28-2019 at 08:15 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pribislav View Post

    ksm.PNG

    As you can see, even though E-V13 percentage among Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija is indeed much above Serbian average (by some ~50%), and is almost comparable to percentage among Albanians, R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 are not even close, in fact they are barely above Serbian average. It's funny how one simple table made your "assimilation process" fantasy null and void. Or are you saying Serbs were assimilating almost exclusively E-V13 Albanians, and rarely to almost never R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 Albanians? Such disproportion is clear indicator E-V13 is not "typical Albanian haplogroup" as you said, it is Paleo-Balkan haplogroup which is clearly older on the territory of Kosovo and Metohija than "typical Albanian haplogroups" R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283. E-V13 probably was a major haplogroup among ancient Dardanians, which were later romanized and gradually became known as Vlachs during Late Antiquity and Early Medieval period. Those are the same Vlachs known from medieval Serbian sources, which were assimilated during medieval times by Serbs, and later by Albanians. On the other hand, great mayority of R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 Albanians are relatively late (medieval & modern) newcomers to Kosovo and Metohija from North Albania, and most of them know even today when and from which North Albanian tribe/fis they came.
    .
    Can you break down V13 into subclades?

    I am looking at the Serbian project (Kosova & Metohija) and I don’t see 380 samples. From what I am seeing Monte clusters seem to dominate (Bjelopavlici Y133830, Vasojevici Y37092, Rajovici BY14160 etc.). There is also one Z16988, some L241 and few unclassified samples.
    Last edited by Keqa; 07-28-2019 at 09:26 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keqa View Post
    Can you break down V13 into subclades?

    I am looking at the Serbian project (Kosova & Metohija) and I don’t see 380 samples. From what I am seeing Monte clusters seem to dominate (Bjelopavlici Y133830, Vasojevici Y37092, Rajovici BY14160 etc.). There is also one Z16988, some L241 and few unclassified samples.
    As I said, these 380 results are from an ongoing testing, so they are not public yet, the paper should be out by the end of the year. The results from Kosovo and Metohija that can be seen in Serbian DNA Project aren't included in the statistics posted above. As SNP testing isn't completed, it's not easy to break all results into deeper subclades based on 23 STRs, even Nevgen isn't that precise with shorter haplotypes. But what I can say based on some specific STR values is that Bjelopavlići cluster Z16988>Y133830 (DYS391=11) is by far the most numerous (almost 1/4 of all V13), there is also several Vasojevići BY14151 haplotypes, but no Kuči and Rajovići. Also, several BY5423 (DYS19=14), Z38456 (DYS458=20), L241 (DYS643=13/14), and probably several FGC11450. Although overall STR variance seems to be high, number of samples doesn't have distinctive STR values, so it's best to wait for SNP confirmations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pribislav View Post
    As I said, these 380 results are from an ongoing testing, so they are not public yet, the paper should be out by the end of the year. The results from Kosovo and Metohija that can be seen in Serbian DNA Project aren't included in the statistics posted above. As SNP testing isn't completed, it's not easy to break all results into deeper subclades based on 23 STRs, even Nevgen isn't that precise with shorter haplotypes. But what I can say based on some specific STR values is that Bjelopavlići cluster Z16988>Y133830 (DYS391=11) is by far the most numerous (almost 1/4 of all V13), there is also several Vasojevići BY14151 haplotypes, but no Kuči and Rajovići. Also, several BY5423 (DYS19=14), Z38456 (DYS458=20), L241 (DYS643=13/14), and probably several FGC11450. Although overall STR variance seems to be high, number of samples doesn't have distinctive STR values, so it's best to wait for SNP confirmations.
    Ok, I will need to see those results though in order to take them seriously. But anywho, with what you have provided us here I don’t see how your statement regarding Vlahs from Kosova could stand.

    - Bjelopavlici (or Palbardhi in Alb) - Y133830 have expanded out of Montenegro but they trace their origin to North Albania.

    - Vasojevici - Y37092 same thing, expanded out of Montenegro.

    - Z38456 with 458=20 in other words BY4461 is a major Albanian cluster.

    - L241 with DYS643=14 are probably PH2180+. Another major Albanian cluster. DYS643=13 could be under A7065 or perhaps are something else. Hard to say without looking all of their markers.

    - FGC11450 samples I have noticed (at least the ones I have seen) are really close to some of our members under Y146086. Another major cluster of ours.

    Only BY5423 is interesting here with somewhat odd distribution (Montenegro, Bosnia, Macedonia) that hasn’t been encountered among us yet.
    Last edited by Keqa; 07-30-2019 at 03:38 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pribislav View Post
    R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 are not even close, in fact they are barely above Serbian average
    What would the Serbian average be for R-BY611 if you exclude Brda, Kosovo, the Leskovac area and Sandzak?
    Last edited by Ownstyler; 09-12-2019 at 02:20 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pribislav View Post
    Here's a quick comparison of E-V13, R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 among Albanians and Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija. Serbian sample is from ongoing testing of Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija, Albanian sample is taken from your project gjenetika.com/statistikat.

    ksm.PNG

    As you can see, even though E-V13 percentage among Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija is indeed much above Serbian average (by some ~50%), and is almost comparable to percentage among Albanians, R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 are not even close, in fact they are barely above Serbian average. It's funny how one simple table made your "assimilation process" fantasy null and void. Or are you saying Serbs were assimilating almost exclusively E-V13 Albanians, and rarely to almost never R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 Albanians? Such disproportion is clear indicator E-V13 is not "typical Albanian haplogroup" as you said, it is Paleo-Balkan haplogroup which is clearly older on the territory of Kosovo and Metohija than "typical Albanian haplogroups" R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283. E-V13 probably was a major haplogroup among ancient Dardanians, which were later romanized and gradually became known as Vlachs during Late Antiquity and Early Medieval period. Those are the same Vlachs known from medieval Serbian sources, which were assimilated during medieval times by Serbs, and later by Albanians. On the other hand, great mayority of R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 Albanians are relatively late (medieval & modern) newcomers to Kosovo and Metohija from North Albania, and most of them know even today when and from which North Albanian tribe/fis they came.

    Also, "Slavic" I2-Y3120 among Serbs from Kosovo and Metohija is just 2% below Serbian average (32%:34%), and R1a is 2,5% below (12,5%:15%).


    This is of course absolutely false.

    And the evidence also suggests that, while there was a steady flow of Albanians from Northern Albania into Kosovo, a major component of the Albanians demographic growth there was the expansion of an indigenous Albanian population within Kosovo itself.

    By the time the Patriarchate was re-established at Pec, the town of Pec itself may already have gained an absolute majority of Muslims. At the same time, there is an increasing evidence that parts of Western Kosovo had a significant ethnic Albanian population, evidence which goes beyond anything that can be demonstrated for the medieval period.




    ---------------------

    Many of the Albanian names which crop up in the early Ottoman registers for Kosovo are Catholic Albanian Christian names, such as Gjin (John) and Doda (a diminutive of Dominic).

    ------------------------------------

    Serbian historians explain the growth of an Albanian population in Kosovo during the early Ottoman period in terms of physical immigration: it is suggested that Albanians from the Malesi were encouraged by the Ottomans to settle in Kosovo, that many of these turned to Islam to gain the advantages of superior status, and that those Slavs who became Muslims were not merely Islamicized but, sooner or later, Albanianized as well.


    The Ottoman officials usually noted which heads of family were new arrivals in their places of residence; out of 121 new arrivals in the nahiye of Pec in 1485, the majority had Slav names.
    In the sancak of Prizren in 1591, only five new arrivals out of forty-one bore Albanian names; and in a group of Kosovo towns in the 1580's and 1590's there were twenty five new Albanian immigrants and 133 with Slav names - several of them described as coming from Bosnia. This evidence counts strongly against the idea of mass immigration from northern Albania. Other more general arguments against that idea are based on relative population sizes and rates of growth. The population of Kosovo during this period was much bigger than that of northern and central Albania, and its rate of growth was actually lower. This is not what one would expect if a large overflow from the Albanian Malesi were flooding into Kosovo.

    --------------.............

    What a straightforward reading of all this evidence would suggest is that there were significant reservoirs of a mainly Catholic Albanian speaking population in parts of Western Kosovo; and evidence from the following century suggests that many of these eventually became Muslims.

    Also most of Western Kosovo was already Albanian in the 1600's, no evidence most of these people even came from northern Albania. Larger groups came from Northern Albania in the 18th century, by the time they came Kosovo already had a large native Albanian population, at least it's Western part was majority Albanian. When these Albanians came so did many Serbs


    Thirdly, the idea that a fixed but gradually eroded Serb population was swamped by a tide of Albanian immigration is misleadingly schematic. There was a flux and emigration, settlement and resettlement, in all sectors of the population. Waves of Orthodox people also migrated into Kosovo: the forced migration of one body of Vasojevic clansmen has already been mentioned, and a large group of Orthodox Vlachs, most of whom would eventually be assimilated in the Serbian Orthodox population, came in the 1770's. Just as Catholic Albanian highlanders moved into Kosovo from the Malesi, so Orthodox Slav ones from the mountains of Montenegro moved into the Sandzak of Novi Pazar; from there, many also spread into northern Kosovo. Members of all the Montenigrin clans took part in this population drift, though they tended to be lumped together under the clan-name Vasojevic. Their reason for moving were just the same as those of the Albanians: a search for better land or grazing, and a desire to escape from vendettas. One French traveller in Kosovo noted in 1911 that some parts of northern Kosovo which had lost their Serbs in the eighteenth century had regained a Slav population not long afterwards: villages near Vucitern which had been entirely Albanianized up to 100 or eighty years ago, he wrote, had then become completely repopulated by Slavs. These Slav highlanders (like their Albanian equivalents) had a very high birth-rate. Orthodox people moved to Kosovo not only from Montenegro, but from all the other surrounding areas too.

    Just by properly doing some research your claim that all Albanians there are latecomers and that the Serbs were swiped off as a result of a mass of immigration of Albanians holds absolutely no truth of course.

    As for your claim regarding the Vlachs that supposedly were assimilated and Albanians came later, their language is related to Albanian. And they lived with Albanians in the Kosovo region as the pre-Ottoman scriptures and evidence shows.

    The Vlachs split from a group of people that lived in the central Balkans / Dardania region most likely around 9th-10th century. And the evidence shows not all were assimilated, they actually migrated out of the region, one group went north into Romania, another group went south.

    Only remnants of a Latin-speaking population survived in parts of the central and west-central Balkans; when it re-emerges into the historical record in the tenth and eleventh centuries, we find its members leading a semi-nomadic life as shepherds, horse-breeders and travelling muleteers. These were the Vlachs, who can still be seen tending their flocks in the mountains of northern Greece, Macedonia and Albania today. The name 'Vlach' was a word used by the Slavs for those they encountered who spoke a strange, usually Latinate, language; the Vlachs' own name for themselves is 'Aromanians' (Aromani). As this name suggests, the Vlachs are closely linked to the Romanians: their two languages (which, with a little practice, are mutually intelligible) diverged only in the ninth or tenth century.

    While Romanian historians have tried to argue that the Romanian-speakers have always lived in the territory of Romania (originating, it is claimed, from Romanized Dacian tribes and/or Roman legionnaries), there is compelling evidence to show that the Romanian-speakers were originally part of the same population as the Vlachs, whose language and way of life were developed somewhere to the south of the Danube. Only in the twelfth century did the early Romanian-speakers move northwards into Romanian territory.
    another key aspect of the Albanian language's connection with Latin: its intimate involvement in the development of the Vlach-Romanian language.
    Linguists have long been aware that Albanian and Romanian have many features in common, in matters of structure, vocabulary and idiom, and that these must have arisen in two ways. First, the substratum of Romanian (that is, the language spoken by the proto-Romanians before they switched to Latin) must have been similar to Albanian; and secondly, there must have been close contact between Albanians and early Romanian speakers over a long period, involving a shared pasotral life. (Some key elements of the pastoral vocabulary in Romanian are borrowed from Albanian.) The substratum elements include both structural matters, such as the positioning of the definite article as a suffix on the end of the noun, and various elements of primitive Balkan pre-Latin vocabulary, such as copil (child in Romanian) or kopil (bastard child in Albanian).

    If the links between the two languages were only at substratum level, this might not imply any geographical proximity - it would merely show that proto-Albanian was similar to other variaties of Illyrian spoken elsewhere. But the pastoral connections do indicate that Albanians and early Romanians lived for a long time in the same (or at least overlapping) areas.

    This has some geographical implications. Late Latin developed in two different forms in the Balkans: a coastal variety, which survived as a distinct language (known as Dalmatian) until the end of the nineteenth century, and the form spoken in the interior, which turned into Romanian and Vlach. From place-names it is clear that the coastal form, spoken also in Shkodra and Durres, penetrated some way into the northern Albanian mountains. There are some traces of this variety of Latin Albanian, but the Albanian language's links with the inland variety of Balkan Latin are much stronger. This suggests that the centre of gravity of Albanian-Vlach symbiosis lay a little further to the east.
    The main area of the Balkan interior where a Latin-speaking population may have continued, in both towns and country, after the Slav invasion, has already been mentioned: it included the upper Morava valley, northern Macedonia, and the whole of Kosovo. It is, therefore, in the uplands o the Kosovo area (particularly, but not only, on the western side, including parts of Montenegro) that this Albanian-Vlach symbiosis probably developed. All the evidence comes together at this point. What it suggests is that the Kosovo region, together with at least part of Northern Albania was the crucial focus of two distinct but interlinked ethnic histories: the survival of the Albanians, and the emergence of the Romanians and Vlachs. One large group of Vlachs seems to have broken away and moved southwards by the ninth or tenth century; the proto-Romanians stayed in contact with Albanians significantly longer, before drifting north-eastwards, and crossing the Danube in the twelfth century.




    Earlier studies linked Albanian exclusively with Romanian; more recent ones have tried to prise them apart, especially if written by Albanians trying to keep Albanian origins in Albania, or Romanians trying to keep Romanian origins in Romania. Mihaescu uses Latin Christian vocabulary in Albanian to emphasize its divergence from Romanian, but this is highly misleading: Romanian has a different vocabulary here simply because Romanians were later brought under the Orthodox church.
    Weigans 'Albanische Einwanderung', shows that some Albanians went with the Romanians into Transylvania

    Many Serbs have arrived in Kosovo much later, they have no continuity with medieval Serbs that used to live there. Many Serbs were also settled in Kosovo during the colonization program between 1912 - 1960 and also later in the 90's by the Milosevic regime. You're making the mistake that these Serbs have a continuity with the medieval ones.


    The higher amount of EV-13 could of course be the result of a bottleneck like prior studies that showed Kosovar Albanians as 40% EV-13. As I highly doubt all Dardanians were EV-13. They had R1b-BY611 and J2b2-L283 too most likely. This is pretty obvious when you look at the Vlach-Albanian symbiosis in many cases. Both groups descending most likely from Romanized and partially Romanized Illyrians that lived in parts of Northern Albania and Dardania.
    Last edited by Boletin; 09-24-2020 at 10:19 PM.

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