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Thread: Bronze artifacts from the Tollense site

  1. #1
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    Bronze artifacts from the Tollense site

    https://gizmodo.com/discovery-of-bro...t-o-1839071107

    ^^The photos are worth the click!

    The assemblage included a bronze awl with a birch handle, which the warrior would have used to puncture holes in a variety of materials. The birch handle was radiocarbon dated to 1300 to 1250 BCE, which nicely matches the age of the battle site. A knife, chisel, decorated belt box, three dress pins, arrowheads, and bronze fragments were among the other items analyzed.

    “This is the first discovery of personal belongings on [the] battlefield and it provides insights into the equipment of a warrior,” said Terberger in a press release, adding that the “fragmented bronze was probably used as a form of early currency.”

    The warrior’s kit also included three thin bronze metal cylinders. These sheets were pierced with bronze nails which were still attached at the ends, and they were rolled up in a manner reminiscent of wristbands. The authors speculate that these cylinders were fittings used for the cloth bag or wooden box, which has since disintegrated.
    Edit -- Full report here:

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...5ACA5111236307

    Conclusion
    The archaeological record of the European Bronze Age is dominated by settlement finds, hoards and funerary evidence. The battlefield site at the Tollense River is very different: no formal burials and no traces of settlement are present in the valley. The many bronze finds suggest that offerings took place in the valley during period III, most probably connected to post-battle rituals. It is also probable, however, that some of the battle participants lost personal equipment in the river, saving it from the looting that inevitably followed the battle. We interpret the small bronze assemblage recovered from Weltzin 28 as a unique find of the typical personal belongings of a warrior who probably originated from southern Central Europe. In turn, this further supports the interpretation that the finds in the Tollense Valley testify to a large violent conflict of supra-regional scale. This conflict should be interpreted in the framework of the social and economic development that characterised Central Europe in the thirteenth century cal BC.
    Last edited by Dewsloth; 10-15-2019 at 09:23 PM.
    R1b>M269>L23>L51>L11>P312>DF19>DF88>FGC11833 >S4281>S4268>Z17112>BY44243

    Ancestors: Francis Cooke (M223/I2a2a) b1583; Hester Mahieu (Cooke) (J1c2 mtDNA) b.1584; Richard Warren (E-M35) b1578; Elizabeth Walker (Warren) (H1j mtDNA) b1583;
    John Mead (I2a1/P37.2) b1634; Rev. Joseph Hull (I1, L1301+ L1302-) b1595; Benjamin Harrington (M223/I2a2a-Y5729) b1618; Joshua Griffith (L21>DF13) b1593;
    John Wing (U106) b1584; Thomas Gunn (DF19) b1605; Hermann Wilhelm (DF19) b1635

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     JMcB (10-18-2019),  Kellebel (10-23-2019),  Lirio100 (10-15-2019)

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    We suggest that the causeway was the starting point of the battle, c. 1300–1250 cal BC, which perhaps involved more than 2000 combatants (Lidke et al. 2015, 2018; Terberger et al. 2018). The multiple findspots of skeletal remains downstream of the causeway are probably the result of warrior groups killed in action as they moved along the riverbank.
    Sögel type swords would be too old, and flange-type Naue ii swords possibly emerging. That time period would also have something like full hilted or Riegsee type swords, although I don't think any swords have been recovered from Tollense?

    I did run across this about the Riegsee and contemporary conditions:

    Already during Period III from 1350/1300 to 1150/ 1100 BC we see that full-hilted swords are more often used in combat, just as some warrior burials in this period may contain the symbolic paraphernalia of ritual chiefs: razors and tweezers. The warriors are making claims to positions previously not open to them. The stable conditions of the ‘ golden ’ Period II had come to an end after 150 – 200 years of wealth expansion and consolidation of power for the ruling chie fl y elites. However, during Period III, 1300 – 1150 BC , a dramatic change took place in the supplies of bronze, probably during the 13th century BC (HaA1). The old network with southern Germany, which had secured a steady fl ow of metal for amber during most of the 15th and 14th centuries BC and provided opportunities for warriors and traders to travel both ways ( Fig. 4), was cut off due to warfare linked to social and religious reformation throughout eastern Central Europe. The archaeological evidence for this is twofold: the successor of the octagonal-hilted swords, the Riegsee full-hilted sword, never reached Denmark, but we suddenly fi nd a group of Riegsee swords in Slovakia, the new hub for contacts to the north (Fig. 8). We may interpret this as an attempt to forge new political alliances, but perhaps it is also a result of new east/west hostilities on a regional scale. At the same time we see a geographical expansion of hoarding (Fig. 8), which was an old ritual tradition in the Carpathians, but now also occurs in central Germany and former Yugoslavia, suggesting either the intrusion of new people from the Carpathian Basin and/or new hostilities. In the Nordic zone, and in the area of the former Tumulus Culture as well as in the Aegean, warrior burials continued and suggest the continuation of old social and ritual traditions (Sperber 1999). In southern Germany one of the central hubs of trade, Bernstorff, was heavily fortified around 1340 BC and shortly after burned down and deserted. Bernstorff is the largest fortified settlement in southern Germany/western Central Europe with a size of 14 ha. Its huge forti fi cations were constructed in the Middle Bronze Age (middle of the 14th century BC ), when the power balance between eastern and western Central Europe was changing, and shortly after it was devastated and burned down along 1.6 km of its length (Bähr et al. 2012). We will probably never know who the enemies were, but we might suspect them to be outsiders, because at the same time we fi nd evidence of major upheavals in eastern Central ..
    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...0-1100_bc#pf18

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/servi...79497X15000171
    Last edited by Dewsloth; 10-18-2019 at 06:41 PM.
    R1b>M269>L23>L51>L11>P312>DF19>DF88>FGC11833 >S4281>S4268>Z17112>BY44243

    Ancestors: Francis Cooke (M223/I2a2a) b1583; Hester Mahieu (Cooke) (J1c2 mtDNA) b.1584; Richard Warren (E-M35) b1578; Elizabeth Walker (Warren) (H1j mtDNA) b1583;
    John Mead (I2a1/P37.2) b1634; Rev. Joseph Hull (I1, L1301+ L1302-) b1595; Benjamin Harrington (M223/I2a2a-Y5729) b1618; Joshua Griffith (L21>DF13) b1593;
    John Wing (U106) b1584; Thomas Gunn (DF19) b1605; Hermann Wilhelm (DF19) b1635

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