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Thread: Where does the African admixture in Mexicans come from?

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    Where does the African admixture in Mexicans come from?

    It seems that most Mexicans carry low levels (~3%) of African ancestry. This percentage is consistent between regions, which possibly means it's quite ancient. Curiously, it is lower among Indigenous Mexicans than in their Cosmopolitan peers (source). What's its most likely source? Were these African-Mexican slaves related to present-day African-Americans? Are Mexicans in general aware they may have this ancestry (or can they identify their African ancestors) or is it in general largely unknown?

    F1.large.jpg

    Some have proposed that this African ancestry was carried by Spanish and Portuguese colonizers, but I think their levels are in general below 1%.

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    The initial colonial Mexican population had this African component in the first centuries and when the population has grown they kept the component just like Neaderthal admixture has been present in the demographic growth in Eurasia.
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    There were actually African conquistadores among the Spaniards.

    negros.jpg

    The group of people that accompanied Cortes in his conquest of the Aztec empire was heterogeneous and besides native allies and white european males they also included a more than decent amount of european women, assimilated Caribbean natives and yes, African people too.

    Many Africans arrived to America as slaves, but many others were already libertos when they stepped the new continent for the first time.

    There are many accounts of cases in which they earned land and wealth and were given titles and positions.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Garrido
    Last edited by Shadogowah; 12-02-2019 at 08:56 PM.
    Do you have a question or topic about genetics in Spain and/or prefer to use Spanish language? Visit the new subforum!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milkyway View Post
    It seems that most Mexicans carry low levels (~3%) of African ancestry. This percentage is consistent between regions, which possibly means it's quite ancient. Curiously, it is lower among Indigenous Mexicans than in their Cosmopolitan peers (source). What's its most likely source? Were these African-Mexican slaves related to present-day African-Americans? Are Mexicans in general aware they may have this ancestry (or can they identify their African ancestors) or is it in general largely unknown?

    F1.large.jpg

    Some have proposed that this African ancestry was carried by Spanish and Portuguese colonizers, but I think their levels are in general below 1%.

    as a Latin American country, Mexico has a history of African slavery


    Afro-Mexicans have deep cultural roots in Mexico, but have been overlooked for centuries by their own country because they are a relatively small population. However, their cultural and historical contributions to Mexico cannot be ignored - not to mention their presence in the country in modern day.


    Why Black Mexicans were all but forgotten

    In 1521, Spain conquered the Aztecs and Mexico became a Spanish colony, and Spain ruled for more than 300 years. During that initial period of colonialism in the 1500s, the slave trade brought about 200,000 West African slaves to Mexico.

    Black slaves were used as foremen by Spanish, and many of the men went on to marry indigenous woman. Because of the mixed bloodlines, indigenous communities were formed with mestizo people and Mexico quickly forgot about their forefathers.

    During post-Mexican revolution, the situation made forgetting about the Black Mexicans even easier because European and indigenous bloodlines were brought to the fore as sources of national pride.

    Afro-Mexican contributions

    Cultural contributions of the Afro-Mexican people, however, live on throughout the country through their various expressions of art including dance and music, which helps to preserve their roots.

    There are even Afro-Mexican musical instruments that still exist like the guijada (a percussive made from donkey jawbone) and the bote (a friction drum). These are used in a genre of folk music called "son jarocho".

    Their religious influence can still be seen in places like Costa Chica, an area along the south coast of the state of Guerrero. A dance called the Danza de Los Diablos (Dance of the Devils) is a clear example of Afro Mexican traditions that are still visible. Historians confirm that the origin of this traditional dance was started in the viceroyalty or colonial era, and was a ritual dedicated to the African god Ruja to whom slaves asked to be freed from the Spanish yoke.

    In modern day, there is an Afro-Mexican dance troop called Obatala that travels and performs throughout southern Mexico. Through their performances, they express their pride in their African heritage and stay connected to their roots.

    Current problems with identity and marginality

    Like many other European colonialists, the Spanish Empire classified people according to their color of skin to organize a stratified social system. Until today, the devastating effects of that still exists.

    Currently, there are almost 14 million Mexicans of African descent in Mexico, most of them living in the Mexcan states of Veracruz and Oaxaca. But they are a minority as the country's total population is more than 129 million.

    But, Afro-Mexicans are statistically far more likely to live in poverty, and some Black Mexicans are still being challenged by authorities regarding their identity and nationality.

    https://www.blackhistory.com/2019/11...ico-1500s.html

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