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Thread: East Iberia?.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron from PA View Post
    I think you are on to something. FTDNA gives me 0 Central Europe and around 80% British. 3/4 of my grandparents have German last names. Paternal line from Baden another from Alsace the other i'm not sure but I suspect either Baden or the Rhineland area. Remaining grandparent line Scotch Irish. Ancestry used to give me 10-15% Iberian. Latest update correctly 0%.
    You figure that for many of us with both Palatine German and British ancestry from the colonial era, they started mixing with each other fairly early. My 3rd great grandfather on my surname line appears to have had only German ancestry, even though he was 3rd generation in the country. However, he married a woman whose father was of Scots-Irish descent, and whose mother was of German descent.

    This couple's oldest son, my 2nd great grandfather, married a woman of either English or Scots-Irish descent, and their only surviving son -- my great grandfather -- married a woman of mixed Scottish and German descent. My great grandparent's oldest son, my grandfather, married a woman of almost exclusively German descent. My point, though, is that each generation of mixing probably makes "unraveling" extremely complicated -- especially since the British themselves have some German descent. (Though, of course, this is far less true of the Scots.)

    Then when you consider the fact that it's unlikely that FTDNA makes any real attempt at phasing the data, it's no wonder that there are problems.
    Besides British-German-Catalan, ancestry includes smaller amounts of French, Irish, Swiss, Choctaw & another NA tribe, possibly Catawba. Avatar picture is: my father, his father, & his father's father; baby is my eldest brother.

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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by geebee View Post
    You figure that for many of us with both Palatine German and British ancestry from the colonial era, they started mixing with each other fairly early. My 3rd great grandfather on my surname line appears to have had only German ancestry, even though he was 3rd generation in the country. However, he married a woman whose father was of Scots-Irish descent, and whose mother was of German descent.

    This couple's oldest son, my 2nd great grandfather, married a woman of either English or Scots-Irish descent, and their only surviving son -- my great grandfather -- married a woman of mixed Scottish and German descent. My great grandparent's oldest son, my grandfather, married a woman of almost exclusively German descent. My point, though, is that each generation of mixing probably makes "unraveling" extremely complicated -- especially since the British themselves have some German descent. (Though, of course, this is far less true of the Scots.)

    Then when you consider the fact that it's unlikely that FTDNA makes any real attempt at phasing the data, it's no wonder that there are problems.
    Very true. I'm mainly German with a heavy dose of British. Something i've wondered about these tests, in particular with 23andME. They claim to go back 300-500 years if thats true should'nt I be 75% German?. But it seems they do pick up more recent as well. I get 60% at 23. Though LDNA shows more then that and MyHeritage though very unreliable finds no British at all.

  3. #13
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    I really dislike these claims of "going back X number of years" because it's just so misleading. They use samples from people who are living or were alive in our lifetimes - modern people. I think their claims of ~500 years come from the assumption that the people who comprise these reference panels have completely certain genealogies. The POBI samples, which Living DNA uses for Britain, were taken from people who had four grandparents living within 50 miles from one another. If we're being conservative, that isn't going back even 200 years. If we take the Tuscany region, which Living DNA compiled outside of a public project that I am aware of, we see a lot of problems with this region. It is common on the current version of the test for someone to get Tuscan without any ancestry from that region. Living DNA has said on a Facebook group that they intend to check over their Tuscan reference problems to try and identify this, indicating that some of their reference populations' genealogies may not be infallible. Thus, if all of a reference's ancestors are not from a single region back 500 years, then the test should not be claiming to be representative of a consumer's ancestry 500 years ago. I think it's actually just a cheap cop-out used to answer general questions about why one's test results are not as expected.
    Paper trail ancestry to the best of my knowledge:
    English (possibly containing some Welsh ancestry) 31.25%, Scottish 17.96%, Scotch-Irish 12.5%, Eastern German 12.5%, Eastern European (Likely Polish possibly including Romanian) 12.5%, French 7.81%, Native American (Saulteaux and Assiniboine) 2.34%, and Colonial American, 3.125%, which cannot be traced with certainty. With certainty, there is Dutch (at least 1.36%) and some English.

  4. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to sktibo For This Useful Post:

     Caius Agrippa (03-28-2020),  geebee (02-23-2020),  JerryS. (03-28-2020),  Jessie (02-27-2020),  Ron from PA (04-19-2020),  TopLobster (02-23-2020)

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    Quote Originally Posted by sktibo View Post
    I really dislike these claims of "going back X number of years" because it's just so misleading. They use samples from people who are living or were alive in our lifetimes - modern people. I think their claims of ~500 years come from the assumption that the people who comprise these reference panels have completely certain genealogies. The POBI samples, which Living DNA uses for Britain, were taken from people who had four grandparents living within 50 miles from one another. If we're being conservative, that isn't going back even 200 years. If we take the Tuscany region, which Living DNA compiled outside of a public project that I am aware of, we see a lot of problems with this region. It is common on the current version of the test for someone to get Tuscan without any ancestry from that region. Living DNA has said on a Facebook group that they intend to check over their Tuscan reference problems to try and identify this, indicating that some of their reference populations' genealogies may not be infallible. Thus, if all of a reference's ancestors are not from a single region back 500 years, then the test should not be claiming to be representative of a consumer's ancestry 500 years ago. I think it's actually just a cheap cop-out used to answer general questions about why one's test results are not as expected.
    Excellent response. That's the pattern I'm seeing with most tests apart from 23andme (that is usually quite accurate to guess correctly ancestry proportions). The references they use to measure 500 years of recent ancestry are mostly based on samples from people they assume to have ancestry from that area from around 500 years ago. But I doubt they really check all of those genealogies.

    That's why tests like MyHeritage, FTDNA and, on a lesser scale, LivingDNA and AncestryDNA can sometimes pop up with random results. After the recent update, in which they supposedly sampled much more people, my LivingDNA results changed considerably, but I'm not sure if they are more accurate than pre-update results.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Caius Agrippa For This Useful Post:

     sktibo (03-28-2020)

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