Page 1 of 23 12311 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 222

Thread: A Genomic Compendium of an Island: Documenting Continuity and Change across Irish Hum

  1. #1
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,759
    Sex
    Location
    Dún Laoire, Bláth Cliath, Éire
    Ethnicity
    Gael
    Nationality
    Éireanach
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-DF41
    mtDNA (M)
    U4d3

    Ireland

    A Genomic Compendium of an Island: Documenting Continuity and Change across Irish Hum

    A Genomic Compendium of an Island: Documenting Continuity and Change across Irish Human Prehistory

    Abstract:
    This thesis provides an initial demographic scaffold for Irish prehistory based on the palaeogenomic analysis of 93 ancient individuals from all major periods of the island's human occupation, sequenced to a median of 1X coverage. ADMIXTURE and principal component analysis identify three ancestrally distinct Irish populations, whose inhabitation of the island corresponds closely to the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Chalcolithic/Early Bronze Age eras, with large scale migration to the island implied during the transitionary periods. Haplotypic-based sharing methods and Y chromosome analysis demonstrate strong continuity between the Early Bronze Age and modern Irish populations, suggesting no substantial population replacement has occurred on the island since this point in time. The Mesolithic population shares high genetic drift with contemporaries from France and Luxembourg and shows evidence of a severe inbreeding bottleneck, apparent through runs of homozygosity (ROH). Substantial contributions from both Mediterranean farming groups and northwestern hunter-gatherers are evident in the Neolithic Irish population. Moreover, evidence for local Mesolithic survival and introgression in southwestern Ireland, long after the commencement of the Neolithic, is also implied in haplotypic-analysis. Societal complexity during the Neolithic is suggested in patterns of Y chromosome and autosomal structure, while the identification of a highly inbred individual through ROH analysis, retrieved from an elite burial context, strongly suggests the elaboration and expansion of megalithic monuments over the course of the Neolithic was accompanied in some regions by dynastic hierarchies. Haplotypic affinities and distributions of steppe-related introgression among samples suggest a potentially bimodal introduction of Beaker culture to the island from both Atlantic and Northern European sources, with southwestern individuals showing inflated levels of Neolithic ancestry relative to individualised burials from the north and east. Signals of genetic continuity and change after this initial establishment of the Irish population are also explored, with haplotypic diversification evident between both the Bronze Age and Iron Age, and the Iron Age and present day. Across these intervals selection pressures related to nutrition appear to have acted, with variants involved in lactase persistence and skin depigmentation showing steady increases in frequency through time. less
    PhD thesis from 2018 gone open access at midnight Irish time (2 hours ago), PDF can be downloaded here:
    http://www.tara.tcd.ie/handle/2262/82960

    I believe it contains details on the first R-M222+ samples ever discovered in ancient remains. In this case from the west of Ireland:

    Within Ireland a large diversity in R1b-DF13 subclades is seen in both the Bronze and Iron Ages, with an expectedly higher number of downstream mutations observed for Iron Age samples (See Electronic Data Table S5). Notably, all northwestern Irish Iron Age individuals sampled (Ballyglass44, Derrynamanagh08 and Derrynamanagh09) were seen to belong to the R1b-M222 subclade or a lineage leading directly to it. This haplogroup peaks in northwestern Ireland today and has been previously associated with the early Medieval Uí Néill dynasty of the region (Moore et al. 2006). Intriguingly, the two southern Iron Age individuals sampled, Courtmacsherry37 and Ballybunnion54, also both share a subclade, R1b-CTS3087. Given the known emphasis placed on patrilineal descent in Gaelic Ireland, denser surveys of Iron Age Y chromosomal variation on the island may contribute greatly to the understanding of territorial boundaries and patronymic surname distributions that were recorded during the early historical period.
    Derrynamanagh, Co. Galway
    Site Description
    The remains of several late Iron Age burials were discovered during farm works at a large rath (GA085- 045), in Derrynamanagh, Co. Galway and excavated by Professor Etienne Rynne in 1969. The site is approximately 12.5km west of Athenry and only 4km from the rath of Feerwore, the proposed original site of the Turoe Stone. It is situated within a steep bend of the Raford river and surrounded by bog. The rath consists of a bank and external earthwork, which form a subcircular enclosure. The burials included two single inhumations in pits and one multiple burial in a stone lined cist. An unpublished report of the skeletal material, written by Professor Stephen Shea of the NUIG Anatomy Dept. (1970), identified the remains within each of the single burials to be of young children, approximately 2-3 years in age, while the multiple burial contained the remains of at least 13 adults.

    Sampling
    Nine petrous bones, DM01-DM09, were located and sampled from the site (Fig. I.15)
    Further Notes
    Extensive kinship was found among individuals at the site (Appendix Two; Fig. II.9). A pair of sisters were identified, DM02 and DM05, to whom DM09 is a second degree male relative. Given all three individuals share the same mitochondrial haplogroup, it is likely DM09 is related to the sisters via the female line. The possible scenarios include a maternal uncle, a nephew (another sister’s child), a half- sibling who shares the same mother, but not a grandfather or grandchild. All three individuals share a fourth degree relative, DM04, while DM09 shares a separate fifth degree relative, DM08.
    --

    Ballyglass Middle , Co Mayo
    Site Description
    The site most likely represents an Iron Age ringbarrow re-used for burial approximately 400 to 600 AD. The skeletal remains were disturbed during quarrying and original burial positions cannot be determined. The remains of an adult male and female, as well as a juvenile of 3-5 years were identified. Radiocarbon determinations for the adult male and female returned dates of 1765±70 BP (80-420 AD; OxA-3871) and 1590±60 (330-610 AD; OxA-3872) respectively.
    The most likely candidate migrants from an archaeological perspective are two eastern individuals from Knowth (175-50 cal BC; 86-252 cal AD), whose burial rites are common in Britain and almost unknown in Ireland during the period (McGarry 2010). This interpretation is supported by their placement away from the main distributions of Irish Iron Age and modern variation. However, it must be noted that a number of other Irish Iron Age individuals place even further towards the British cluster, including three unrelated samples from Ballyglass Middle, the only Irish Iron Age site sampled that shows clear ancestral homogeneity among burials. The site itself is unusual in the relatively early date retrieved from unburnt bone (80-420 cal AD), at a time cremation was ubiquitous in Ireland. Two individuals from Derrynamanagh also show increased British affinities, but again the site shows wide differentiation on PCs 2 and 4, despite the close kinship among a number of samples (not included here). Previously undetected relatedness is also seen here between Derrynamanagh04 and Derrynamanagh05, later confirmed through IBD kinship analysis, which revealed the pair to be fourth degree relatives (Appendix II).
    (R1b-DF41+)
    (MtDNA: U4d3)

    How to pronounce my username (modern Irish):
    Hidden Content

  2. The Following 65 Users Say Thank You to Dubhthach For This Useful Post:

     167273 (05-23-2020),  ADW_1981 (05-23-2020),  alan (05-23-2020),  alchemist223 (05-23-2020),  Andour (05-24-2020),  anglesqueville (05-23-2020),  angscoire (05-23-2020),  Aroon1916 (05-23-2020),  caithne (05-23-2020),  Caledonian (05-27-2020),  Cascio (05-23-2020),  Chnodomar (05-23-2020),  David Mc (05-23-2020),  deadly77 (05-23-2020),  evon (05-23-2020),  FionnSneachta (05-23-2020),  glentane (05-23-2020),  Hando (05-23-2020),  hartaisarlag (05-23-2020),  Heber (05-28-2020),  Helen (05-23-2020),  Hodo Scariti (05-23-2020),  homunculus (05-28-2020),  J Man (05-27-2020),  J1 DYS388=13 (05-23-2020),  jdean (05-23-2020),  Jessie (05-23-2020),  JMcB (05-23-2020),  JonikW (05-23-2020),  Judith (05-24-2020),  Kelso (05-25-2020),  Kopfjäger (05-24-2020),  Kulin (05-23-2020),  Megalophias (05-23-2020),  Michalis Moriopoulos (05-23-2020),  MitchellSince1893 (05-23-2020),  Nas (05-23-2020),  Net Down G5L (05-23-2020),  Nibelung (05-23-2020),  Onur Dincer (05-29-2020),  parasar (05-23-2020),  pgbk87 (05-23-2020),  pmokeefe (05-23-2020),  Pribislav (05-23-2020),  Principe (05-23-2020),  Psynome (05-27-2020),  Pylsteen (05-25-2020),  R.Rocca (05-23-2020),  Radboud (05-23-2020),  razyn (05-23-2020),  RCO (05-23-2020),  rms2 (05-23-2020),  Robert1 (05-23-2020),  rozenfeld (05-23-2020),  Ruderico (05-23-2020),  Ryukendo (05-23-2020),  Saetro (05-23-2020),  Seabass (05-24-2020),  sheepslayer (05-23-2020),  sktibo (05-23-2020),  slievenamon (05-24-2020),  Táltos (05-30-2020),  teepean47 (05-23-2020),  vettor (05-25-2020),  Webb (05-23-2020)

  3. #2
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    1,258
    Sex
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ethnicity
    100% European
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    DF27>Z195>FGC23196
    mtDNA (M)
    U5a1a2a

    United States of America United Kingdom Germany Ireland Scotland Wales
    I found this interesting:

    "L21 appears at a similarly high frequencies in the island’s Chalcolithic/Bronze Age and Iron Age populations (Fig. 4.9), with only one sample from each period (Bolinready79 and HillOfWard14) not possessing the marker."

    Are both of these samples just P312 because they are not L21 or because they couldn't get a read at L21?

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Webb For This Useful Post:

     ADW_1981 (05-23-2020),  Dewsloth (05-23-2020),  Hando (05-24-2020),  Onur Dincer (05-29-2020)

  5. #3
    Registered Users
    Posts
    579
    Sex
    Location
    Belgrade
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Nationality
    Serb
    Y-DNA (P)
    PH908>A5913>A22312

    Serbia Montenegro Bosnia and Herzegovina Croatia Split-Dalmatia
    Supplementary spreadsheets are available here.

  6. The Following 24 Users Say Thank You to Pribislav For This Useful Post:

     Dewsloth (05-23-2020),  Dubhthach (05-23-2020),  evon (05-23-2020),  Hando (05-24-2020),  Helen (05-23-2020),  J Man (05-27-2020),  jdean (05-23-2020),  JMcB (05-23-2020),  Judith (05-24-2020),  Kelso (05-25-2020),  Net Down G5L (05-23-2020),  Nibelung (05-23-2020),  Onur Dincer (05-29-2020),  parasar (05-23-2020),  Piquerobi (05-23-2020),  Principe (05-23-2020),  Psynome (05-27-2020),  R.Rocca (05-24-2020),  rms2 (05-23-2020),  Robert1 (05-25-2020),  Ruderico (05-23-2020),  sheepslayer (05-23-2020),  uintah106 (05-23-2020),  Webb (05-23-2020)

  7. #4
    Suspended Account
    Posts
    13,010
    Sex
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Ethnicity
    British and Irish
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-DF41>FGC36981
    mtDNA (M)
    U5a2c3a
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-DF27>DF83
    mtDNA (P)
    K1a1a

    Wales Ireland Scotland France Bretagne England Switzerland
    Quote Originally Posted by Webb View Post
    I found this interesting:

    "L21 appears at a similarly high frequencies in the island’s Chalcolithic/Bronze Age and Iron Age populations (Fig. 4.9), with only one sample from each period (Bolinready79 and HillOfWard14) not possessing the marker."

    Are both of these samples just P312 because they are not L21 or because they couldn't get a read at L21?
    Both are ancestral for L21, but HW14 has "Further Investigation Hidden Below" in the P312 block.

  8. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to rms2 For This Useful Post:

     Dubhthach (05-23-2020),  Hando (05-24-2020),  jdean (05-23-2020),  Onur Dincer (05-29-2020),  Principe (05-23-2020),  sheepslayer (05-23-2020),  Webb (05-23-2020)

  9. #5
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,759
    Sex
    Location
    Dún Laoire, Bláth Cliath, Éire
    Ethnicity
    Gael
    Nationality
    Éireanach
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-DF41
    mtDNA (M)
    U4d3

    Ireland
    With regards to M222, this study doesn't include the Ranelagh site in Roscommon where M222 has also been found. Here's a google map showing distance between the two sites in study and how far they are from Ranelagh Co. Roscommon:

    https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Derr...53.3058961!3e2

    If you recall the old 2006 study from Trinity there was a peak in M222 in west of Ireland in modern samples:



    This mapped also onto data seen in ScotlandsDNA/IrelandsDNA testing DB:



    The Ranelagh site is later than either of two sites in this thesis, dating more squarely from the Christian period and spanning into the late Middle ages.
    (R1b-DF41+)
    (MtDNA: U4d3)

    How to pronounce my username (modern Irish):
    Hidden Content

  10. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Dubhthach For This Useful Post:

     ADW_1981 (05-23-2020),  Hando (05-24-2020),  Helen (05-23-2020),  JMcB (05-24-2020),  Nas (05-24-2020),  rms2 (05-23-2020),  Robert1 (05-25-2020),  sheepslayer (05-23-2020),  slievenamon (05-24-2020),  Webb (05-23-2020)

  11. #6
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,643
    Ethnicity
    Pred.Anglo-Saxon + Briton
    Nationality
    Canadian
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b S21184, BY50830+
    mtDNA (M)
    U4b1a2 - FGS
    Y-DNA (M)
    ?
    mtDNA (P)
    I2

    Canada England Wales Netherlands France Cornwall
    Can someone remind me if Britain had Neolithic I2 lineages which were not I2-M423*, I2a*(xM26), or I2-M284?
    YDNA: R1b-BY50830 Stepney, London, UK George Wood b. 1782 English <-> Bavarian cluster
    maternal-gf YDNA: ?? Gurr, James ~1740, Smarden, Kent, England.
    maternal-gm YDNA: R1b-P311+ Beech, John Richard b. 1780, Lewes, England
    maternal-ggf YDNA R1b-U106 Thomas, Edward b 1854, Sittingbourne, Kent
    paternal-ggf YDNA: R1b-Z17901. Gould, John Somerset England 1800s.
    paternal-ggf YDNA: R1b-L48. Scott, William Hamilton Ireland(?) 1800s

    other:
    Welch: early 1800s E-M84 Kent, England.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to ADW_1981 For This Useful Post:

     R.Rocca (05-24-2020)

  13. #7
    Suspended Account
    Posts
    13,010
    Sex
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Ethnicity
    British and Irish
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-DF41>FGC36981
    mtDNA (M)
    U5a2c3a
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-DF27>DF83
    mtDNA (P)
    K1a1a

    Wales Ireland Scotland France Bretagne England Switzerland
    Quote Originally Posted by ADW_1981 View Post
    Can someone remind me if Britain had Neolithic I2 lineages which were not I2-M423*, I2a*(xM26), or I2-M284?
    Just looking real quick, I6750, a Neolithic British sample, was I2a2-L37 according to Olalde et al, which is supposed to be on the same level as M436.

    There may be others that fit the bill, but I just noticed that one and thought I would post it before looking further.

  14. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to rms2 For This Useful Post:

     Hando (05-24-2020),  JMcB (05-24-2020),  Kopfjäger (05-24-2020),  Onur Dincer (05-29-2020),  slievenamon (05-24-2020)

  15. #8
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    1,258
    Sex
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ethnicity
    100% European
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    DF27>Z195>FGC23196
    mtDNA (M)
    U5a1a2a

    United States of America United Kingdom Germany Ireland Scotland Wales
    it really is a well put together paper. 300 some pages of research. I'm disappointed that there are not any DF27 samples.

  16. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Webb For This Useful Post:

     ADW_1981 (05-23-2020),  Hando (05-24-2020),  Jessie (05-24-2020),  R.Rocca (05-24-2020),  Robert1 (05-25-2020),  Ruderico (05-23-2020),  Táltos (05-30-2020)

  17. #9
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,759
    Sex
    Location
    Dún Laoire, Bláth Cliath, Éire
    Ethnicity
    Gael
    Nationality
    Éireanach
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-DF41
    mtDNA (M)
    U4d3

    Ireland
    Quote Originally Posted by Webb View Post
    it really is a well put together paper. 300 some pages of research. I'm disappointed that there are not any DF27 samples.
    Cremation was really the preferred method for over 2,000 years up to arrival of Christianity. Of course we should remember that this is work that was done up to 2016/7, it's been under embargo for 2 years. So in sense it basically built the knowledge base in Irish universities for aDNA research. What will be interesting will be the work built on this, particulary given some of large scale burial sites discovered in the last 15-20 years that cover the Early Christian to Early Medieval period (500-1200AD).

    I also imagine that the inferences that can be drawn (the site in Galway that yielded 2 x M222+ individuals for example) with regards to use of sites for shared kindred burials will make a lot of historians and archaelogists interested in getting further sequencing done.
    (R1b-DF41+)
    (MtDNA: U4d3)

    How to pronounce my username (modern Irish):
    Hidden Content

  18. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to Dubhthach For This Useful Post:

     Hando (05-24-2020),  Jessie (05-24-2020),  JMcB (05-24-2020),  Judith (05-24-2020),  Kelso (05-25-2020),  Nas (05-24-2020),  R.Rocca (05-24-2020),  Robert1 (05-25-2020),  Ruderico (05-23-2020),  slievenamon (05-24-2020),  Webb (05-23-2020)

  19. #10
    Registered Users
    Posts
    585
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    British
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-DF49*
    mtDNA (M)
    K1a4a1

    Northern Ireland England Scotland Isle of Man
    Quote Originally Posted by Dubhthach View Post
    I believe it contains details on the first R-M222+ samples ever discovered in ancient remains. In this case from the west of Ireland:
    --
    Are they actually M222? I find it hard to remember how to read the old long-form handles, but it looks like BM44 (from Ballyglass, Co. Mayo), DM09 (Derrynamanagh, Co. Galway), and LG14 (Lagore, Co. Meath) are all listed as R1b1a1a2a1a2c1a1a, which I thought was the equivalent of DF49.

    Either way, I'm ecstatic to see so many ancient DNA results coming out of Ireland in one paper. DIdn;t realize it was coming.

  20. The Following User Says Thank You to David Mc For This Useful Post:

     Hando (05-24-2020)

Page 1 of 23 12311 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Nordic Bronze Age continuity!?
    By Finn in forum Ancient (aDNA)
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 05-25-2019, 07:10 AM
  2. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-31-2019, 10:06 AM
  3. Replies: 475
    Last Post: 08-23-2016, 04:26 PM
  4. Paleolithic continuity
    By anglesqueville in forum History (Ancient)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-10-2015, 06:46 AM
  5. New format for my aDNA compendium?
    By Jean M in forum General
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-10-2013, 08:30 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •