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Thread: [split] Loanword Exploration in Indo-Aryan Languages

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    [split] Loanword Exploration in Indo-Aryan Languages

    Quote Originally Posted by DMXX View Post
    ...
    * Interesting name. "Chokh" is the Turkic word for "good" and "pani" is clearly "water" in Hindi.
    Thanks for the input DMXX. Having used the Simulated AA to model SE Asians, so I can see your point about how that's problematic.

    Btw, Chokho means "clean/pure" in (casual) Nepali while more formal word for "pure" would be "Suddha". Could Chokho be a Turkic loanword in Nepali?

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    Quote Originally Posted by poi View Post
    Thanks for the input DMXX. Having used the Simulated AA to model SE Asians, so I can see your point about how that's problematic.

    Btw, Chokho means "clean/pure" in (casual) Nepali while more formal word for "pure" would be "Suddha". Could Chokho be a Turkic loanword in Nepali?
    Chokha means good in Haryanvi iirc. But I never thought of it as a loanword.
    As far as I know there are next to null Turkic loanwords in Indian languages, say even ones like Urdu. One of the few turkic words in urdu is the name itself "ordu" - horde
    Last edited by client; 04-27-2019 at 04:06 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by client View Post
    Chokha means good in Haryanvi iirc. But I never thought of it as a loanword.
    As far as I know there are next to null Turkic loanwords in Indian languages, say even ones like Urdu. One of the few turkic words in urdu is the name itself "ordu" - horde
    Similar words like changa in Punjabi (and sometimes used in rustic Bangla slang), meaning good also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kulin View Post
    Similar words like changa in Punjabi (and sometimes used in rustic Bangla slang), meaning good also.
    चांगला(Changla) in Marathi, so I'm not 100% sure if Chokha is related to that(because Punjabi-Marathi are closer). But probably is imo


    I think there is also a chokha in Punjabi that seems to have a closer meaning to Turkic šok - "A lot" or "in abundance"


    Probably going off topic sorry
    Last edited by client; 04-27-2019 at 04:13 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poi View Post
    Thanks for the input DMXX. Having used the Simulated AA to model SE Asians, so I can see your point about how that's problematic.

    Btw, Chokho means "clean/pure" in (casual) Nepali while more formal word for "pure" would be "Suddha". Could Chokho be a Turkic loanword in Nepali?
    Chokho and Ramro are de facto Nepali words for saying good/pure. I never use Shuddha while speaking. I┬ĺve only used it during exams because they would┬ĺve cut my marks if I had used chokho instead of Shuddha.

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    Regarding the word "chokha", I gave the wrong meaning of the word ("good" has several variants, including "yaxshi" or "iyi"). "Chokh" means "very" in the Oghuz branch of Turkic (from my reading of a Russian-Kazakh dictionary just now, no related term exists, they use "asa", "tyin", "eren" etc instead).

    Even if the words did have the same meaning, a Turkic origin for it in Nepali languages would be very hard to justify, given the Turkic languages have never had an attested presence in the southern Himalayas (closest you'll get is Salar in central China).

    A quick correction - The Turkish word "client" posted is a cognate of "chokh/chox" (that funny c is a "ch" and Turkish underwent a kh->k consonant shift following Ataturks reforms - All non-Turkish Turkic speakers from places like Azerbaijan, Georgia, southern Russia, Turkmenistan and Iran have retained the original pronounciation).
    Last edited by DMXX; 04-27-2019 at 04:46 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pnb123 View Post
    Chokho and Ramro are de facto Nepali words for saying good/pure. I never use Shuddha while speaking. I┬’ve only used it during exams because they would┬’ve cut my marks if I had used chokho instead of Shuddha.
    True, the word “Chokho” is more casual and not a literary word in more formal settings. The Sanskrit based “shuddha” is used in those formal settings. In casual settings, if somebody says “shuddha pani”, they would be laughed out as being pretentious, while in literature/formal settings,you see “shuddha pani” quite a bit.

    Also, DMXX is right that Nepali would not have Turkic words, unless it came from India/Mughals. Words like Bahadur and Hajur are ingrained in the language, but both are from the Mughal influence.
    Last edited by poi; 04-27-2019 at 05:28 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by client View Post
    चांगला(Changla) in Marathi, so I'm not 100% sure if Chokha is related to that(because Punjabi-Marathi are closer). But probably is imo


    I think there is also a chokha in Punjabi that seems to have a closer meaning to Turkic šok - "A lot" or "in abundance"


    Probably going off topic sorry
    Never heard of word chokha in Punjabi, for something good "chakwan" is used, which comes from "it's so good you want to pick/grab it".

    Depending on the dialect of punjabi, there are numerous words for "good". Changa, vdiya, chakwan, siraa etc.

    Chokha reminds me of rajasthani resturant chokhi dhaani.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poi View Post
    True, the word “Chokho” is more casual and not a literary word in more formal settings. The Sanskrit based “shuddha” is used in those formal settings. In casual settings, if somebody says “shuddha pani”, they would be laughed out as being pretentious, while in literature/formal settings,you see “shuddha pani” quite a bit.

    Also, DMXX is right that Nepali would not have Turkic words, unless it came from India/Mughals. Words like Bahadur and Hajur are ingrained in the language, but both are from the Mughal influence.
    I have grown up hearing many strange words, one of them was 'Kard' for Knife, but there are many that I no longer even remember. Potohari has a lot of words that are distinct from Punjabi, giving the language its own unique character. Here are a few of them.

    Past / Yesterday: ParooN
    Hillock: Marhi (This is the source of the name of the renowned hill station Murree, in the past they would call it Koh Murree).
    Dhakki: Another word for a Hillock or a Mound
    Dhok: A hut or structure on a hill.
    Village: GraaN

    Poonchhi retains many more archaic words, for its remoteness.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rahuls77 View Post
    I have grown up hearing many strange words, one of them was 'Kard' for Knife, but there are many that I no longer even remember. Potohari has a lot of words that are distinct from Punjabi, giving the language its own unique character. Here are a few of them.

    Past / Yesterday: ParooN
    Hillock: Marhi (This is the source of the name of the renowned hill station Murree, in the past they would call it Koh Murree).
    Dhakki: Another word for a Hillock or a Mound
    Dhok: A hut or structure on a hill.
    Village: GraaN

    Poonchhi retains many more archaic words, for its remoteness.
    Paroon-praar, marhi are both familiar and used in powadh and doaba region.

    Kard is very common actually, more so than chaghu. My family always called knife Kard.

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