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Thread: New Archeology Papers (Titles and Abstracts Only, Please)

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    Current developments and future directions in archaeological science

    Current developments and future directions in archaeological science
    Suzanne E. Pilaar Birch and Paul Szpak
    October 17, 2022
    https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2212490119

    The field of archaeological science has grown to encompass a wide range of analytical techniques over the past 20 years. The application of methods initially developed and grounded in physics, chemistry, biology, and geology have been brought together to fill in the parts of the human story missing from the traditional archaeological record and added nuance to our understanding of the lived experience of people in the past.
    Michael Tite was the first person to hold a chair in archaeological science in the United Kingdom, a role to which he was appointed at Oxford University in 1989. Writing in 1991, he did not consider archaeological science as a discipline all on its own but rather a meeting ground for collaboration; he emphasized the importance of integration of theory and method in both traditional archaeology and various contributing sciences (1). Throughout the 1990s, but particularly the early 2000s, the number of publications in the area of archaeological science skyrocketed (2). Institutional support increased in the United Kingdom but lagged in North America, as did training for graduate students and innovations in archaeological science techniques (3). This trend has largely continued. By 2015, David Killick wrote of the “awkward adolescence” of archaeological science, citing a rapid pace of growth but noting challenges in funding, quality control, and access (4). Most recently, Kate Britton and Michael Richards commented on the acceptance of archaeological science in mainstream archaeology but cautioned that practitioners need to understand the theory behind the techniques they use to ensure proper application, as well as integrate methodology and complex archaeological research questions (5).
    In this special feature of PNAS, we recognize several key landmarks in the growth of archaeological science as it continues to move forward as a discipline. We review several developments in the areas of radiometric dating, stable isotope and elemental analysis, and proteomics. We offer insight into the future applications of these methods as analytical techniques continue to be refined and improved. But we agree with our colleagues that multiple challenges remain to be addressed.

    Dating the Paleolithic: Trapped charge methods and amino acid geochronology
    Kirsty E. H. Penkman, Geoff A. T. Duller, Helen M. Roberts, +2, and Dustin White
    October 17, 2022
    https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2109324119
    Abstract
    Despite the vast array of different geochronological tools available, dating the Paleolithic remains one of the discipline’s greatest challenges. This review focuses on two different dating approaches: trapped charge and amino acid geochronology. While differing in their fundamental principles, both exploit time-dependent changes in signals found within crystals to generate a chronology for the material dated and hence, the associated deposits. Within each method, there is a diverse range of signals that can be analyzed, each covering different time ranges, applicable to different materials and suitable for different paleoenvironmental and archaeological contexts. This multiplicity of signals can at first sight appear confusing, but it is a fundamental strength of the techniques, allowing internal checks for consistency and providing more information than simply a chronology. For each technique, we present an overview of the basis for the time-dependent signals and the types of material that can be analyzed, with examples of their archaeological application, as well as their future potential.

    Reconstructing biblical military campaigns using geomagnetic field data
    --- same issue of PNAS, previously posted in this thread by JMcB

    Dating the emergence of dairying by the first farmers of Central Europe using 14C analysis of fatty acids preserved in pottery vessels
    Emmanuelle Casanova, Timothy D. J. Knowles, Alex Bayliss, +10, and Richard P. Evershed
    October 17, 2022
    https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2109325118
    Significance
    Calendrical dating for the introduction of new food commodities affords enhanced understanding of major changes in human food procurement. Here, direct dating of milk residues from the Early Neolithic in Central Europe demonstrates the use of this unique secondary product from animals arrived with the earliest Linearbandkeramik settlers in the western (France, the Netherlands, and northwestern Germany) and eastern (Poland) extensions of the cultural group. At a time when most adult humans lacked the lactase-persistence gene variant, the adoption and intensification of a dairy-based economy would have had significant impact on human diet, evolution, and environment.
    Abstract
    Direct, accurate, and precise dating of archaeological pottery vessels is now achievable using a recently developed approach based on the radiocarbon dating of purified molecular components of food residues preserved in the walls of pottery vessels. The method targets fatty acids from animal fat residues, making it uniquely suited for directly dating the inception of new food commodities in prehistoric populations. Here, we report a large-scale application of the method by directly dating the introduction of dairying into Central Europe by the Linearbandkeramik (LBK) cultural group based on dairy fat residues. The radiocarbon dates (n = 27) from the 54th century BC from the western and eastern expansion of the LBK suggest dairy exploitation arrived with the first settlers in the respective regions and were not gradually adopted later. This is particularly significant, as contemporaneous LBK sites showed an uneven distribution of dairy exploitation. Significantly, our findings demonstrate the power of directly dating the introduction of new food commodities, hence removing taphonomic uncertainties when assessing this indirectly based on associated cultural materials or other remains.

    A Neandertal dietary conundrum: Insights provided by tooth enamel Zn isotopes from Gabasa, Spain
    Klervia Jaouen, Vanessa Villalba-Mouco, Geoff M. Smith, +17, and Lourdes Montes
    October 17, 2022
    https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2109315119
    Significance
    Neandertals’ diets are a topic of continued debate, especially since their disappearance has been frequently attributed to their subsistence strategy. There is no clear consensus on how variable their diets were in time and space. Isotope studies have helped quantify meat consumption in Neandertals, but usually rely on nitrogen isotope analyses of collagen, a protein rarely preserved in samples older than 50 ka. Moreover, collagen extraction for isotope analyses is rarely successful in Iberian skeletal material. Here, we employ zinc isotope analysis of dental enamel of a Neandertal and associated fauna (Gabasa, Spain), which can be applied to contexts >50 ka. This proxy confirms a high level of carnivory in an Iberian Neandertal.
    Abstract
    The characterization of Neandertals’ diets has mostly relied on nitrogen isotope analyses of bone and tooth collagen. However, few nitrogen isotope data have been recovered from bones or teeth from Iberia due to poor collagen preservation at Paleolithic sites in the region. Zinc isotopes have been shown to be a reliable method for reconstructing trophic levels in the absence of organic matter preservation. Here, we present the results of zinc (Zn), strontium (Sr), carbon (C), and oxygen (O) isotope and trace element ratio analysis measured in dental enamel on a Pleistocene food web in Gabasa, Spain, to characterize the diet and ecology of a Middle Paleolithic Neandertal individual. Based on the extremely low δ66Zn value observed in the Neandertal’s tooth enamel, our results support the interpretation of Neandertals as carnivores as already suggested by δ15N isotope values of specimens from other regions. Further work could help identify if such isotopic peculiarities (lowest δ66Zn and highest δ15N of the food web) are due to a metabolic and/or dietary specificity of the Neandertals.
    Last edited by pmokeefe; 10-26-2022 at 09:09 AM.
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  3. #202
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    Archaeology, mainly Polish, in the current discussion on the ethnogenesis of the Slavs

    Abstract
    This paper is an attempt at outlining the current state of discussion about the ethnogenesis of the Slavs, mainly within the framework of Polish scientific research, with particular consideration of archaeological theories, both in terms of their differences as well as any similarities. The discussion covers the allochthonic theory (which is predominant in the science), autochthonic theory, as well as the concept defined by an American archaeologist, Florin Curta, which falls outside these two main discourses. The rationale proposed within this paper could support the resumption of a harmonious discussion among the archaeologists on the problem of the ethnogenesis of the Slavs.

    https://pressto.amu.edu.pl/index.php...ew/35821/30799
    Last edited by Waldemar; 11-02-2022 at 08:37 AM.

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    Kiukainen Culture Site Locations—Reflections from the Coastal Lifestyle at the End of the Stone Age
    September 2022Land 11(9):1606
    DOI:10.3390/land11091606
    LicenseCC BY 4.0
    Authors:
    Janne Soisalo
    University of Helsinki
    Johanna Roiha
    University of Helsinki



    Abstract and Figures
    The Kiukainen culture constitutes a poorly known phase at the end of the Stone Age in Finland, approximately 2500–1800 cal. BC. It is best known for its pottery, and most of the finds are from the coastal area of the Baltic Sea between Helsinki and Ostrobothnia. Previous research on the culture was done several decades ago, so this study aims to define the geographical distribution of the sites known thus far and discuss the landscape around the settlement sites. Creating an overall view of the culture and lifestyle of the people is also an important part of the study. First, it focuses on different collections of Kiukainen pottery and then maps the location of all the sites where pottery has been found. For the landscape visualizations, three different areas were chosen for closer evaluation. Elevation models were, then, used to visualize the Stone Age coastal landscape. Altogether, we identified 99 settlement sites with a confirmed connection to Kiukainen culture. One common feature of the locations is a connection to the sea. The sites are located in various types of environments, but they all have easy access to seafaring and good landing possibilities from the sea.

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    Tin from Uluburun shipwreck (Turkey) shows exchange across Late Bronze Age Eurasia

    Tin from Uluburun shipwreck shows small-scale commodity exchange fueled continental tin supply across Late Bronze Age Eurasia
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    AYNE POWELL , MICHAEL FRACHETTI , CEMAL PULAK , H. ARTHUR BANKOFF, [...], AND K. ASLIHAN YENER
    https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abq3766

    Abstract
    This paper provides the first comprehensive sourcing analysis of the tin ingots carried by the well-known Late Bronze Age shipwreck found off the Turkish coast at Uluburun (ca. 1320 BCE). Using lead isotope, trace element, and tin isotope analyses, this study demonstrates that ores from Central Asia (Uzbekistan and Tajikistan) were used to produce one-third of the Uluburun tin ingots. The remaining two-thirds were derived from the Taurus Mountains of Turkey, namely, from stream tin and residual low-grade mineralization remaining after extensive exploitation in the Early Bronze Age. The results of our metallurgical analysis, along with archaeological and textual data, illustrate that a culturally diverse, multiregional, and multivector system underpinned Eurasian tin exchange during the Late Bronze Age. The demonstrable scale of this connectivity reveals a vast and disparate network that relied as much on the participation of small regional communities as on supposedly hegemonic institutions of large, centralized states.
    Last edited by pmokeefe; 11-30-2022 at 09:39 PM.
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    The Saybur reliefs: a narrative scene from the Neolithic


    Abstract

    A wall relief, comprising five figures carved on a bench in a communal building dating to the ninth millennium BC, was found in south-eastern Turkey in 2021. It constitutes the earliest known depiction of a narrative ‘scene’, and reflects the complex relationship between humans, the natural world and the animal life that surrounded them during the transition to a sedentary lifestyle.

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...B225FE70EBDD02
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  11. #206
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    Not prehistory but this is as good a place as any to post it, and it should cheer the hearts of all lovers of Roman Britain and its auxiliary forces.

    The Vindolanda Charitable Trust has been awarded a 1.625m grant by The National Lottery Heritage Fund, allowing the 2.5m excavation of the Magna fort on Hadrian’s Wall.

    In the words of the trust, “this project will enable a five-year research excavation at Magna Roman Fort, home to two of the most exotic Roman regiments to have served in Roman Britain, the Syrian archers and the Dalmatian mountain soldiers.” The fort was also manned by nominal Batavians during its time as well as legionaries from the Second Augusta and the Valeria Victrix.

    If the finds are anything like in the league of those from Vindolanda, we’ll be in for a treat. The prospects certainly look good: “Recent geoarchaeological survey work has proved beyond doubt that Magna has some of, if not the richest, environmental deposits thus far identified from the World Heritage Site [Hadrian’s Wall].”
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  13. #207
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    The transmission of pottery technology among prehistoric European hunter-gatherers

    The transmission of pottery technology among prehistoric European hunter-gatherers
    Ekaterina Dolbunova, Alexandre Lucquin, T. Rowan McLaughlin, Manon Bondetti, Blandine Courel, Ester Oras, Henny Piezonka, Harry K. Robson, Helen Talbot, Kamil Adamczak, Konstantin Andreev, Vitali Asheichyk, Maxim Charniauski, Agnieszka Czekaj-Zastawny, Igor Ezepenko, Tatjana Grechkina, Alise Gunnarssone, Tatyana M. Gusentsova, Dmytro Haskevych, Marina Ivanischeva, Jacek Kabaciński, Viktor Karmanov, Natalia Kosorukova, Elena Kostyleva, Aivar Kriiska, Stanisław Kukawka, Olga Lozovskaya, Andrey Mazurkevich, Nadezhda Nedomolkina, Gytis Piličiauskas, Galina Sinitsyna, Andrey Skorobogatov, Roman V. Smolyaninov, Aleksey Surkov, Oleg Tkachov, Maryia Tkachova, Andrey Tsybrij, Viktor Tsybrij, Aleksandr A. Vybornov, Adam Wawrusiewicz, Aleksandr I. Yudin, John Meadows, Carl Heron & Oliver E. Craig
    Nature Human Behaviour (2022)

    Abstract
    Human history has been shaped by global dispersals of technologies, although understanding of what enabled these processes is limited. Here, we explore the behavioural mechanisms that led to the emergence of pottery among hunter-gatherer communities in Europe during the mid-Holocene. Through radiocarbon dating, we propose this dispersal occurred at a far faster rate than previously thought. Chemical characterization of organic residues shows that European hunter-gatherer pottery had a function structured around regional culinary practices rather than environmental factors. Analysis of the forms, decoration and technological choices suggests that knowledge of pottery spread through a process of cultural transmission. We demonstrate a correlation between the physical properties of pots and how they were used, reflecting social traditions inherited by successive generations of hunter-gatherers. Taken together the evidence supports kinship-driven, super-regional communication networks that existed long before other major innovations such as agriculture, writing, urbanism or metallurgy.
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    Last edited by Youwon; 12-28-2022 at 03:45 AM.

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    The Dawn of the Early Bronze Age in South-western Slovakia

    This paper deals with the chronology and social structure of the Early Bronze Age cemetery of Včapy-Opatovce (Slovakia/Nitra district). Six radiocarbon dates are presented for the Nitra culture cemetery, which date Včapy-Opatovce to the very beginning of the Early Bronze Age (2300/2200 – 1500/1400 BCE), roughly contemporaneous with the first phases of the Branč cemetery (Nitra district). A small group of graves originally attributed to the Copper Age Ludanice group also seem to date at least partially to the Bronze Age. The results of the radiocarbon dating do not support a chronological division of the cemetery. Applying a burial index (Z-transformation), five grave clusters were identified within the cemetery. These concentrations of richly furnished graves are separated from each other by poor graves. Two of the clusters could be dated by the radiocarbon dates and demonstrated different areas at the burial ground were used at the same time. The authors conclude that in particular the chronological burial site model of Ch. Bernard, which she proposed in 2005 for Včapy-Opatovce, should be rejected. The combination of the results of the analysis of the grave indices and radiocarbon dates for Včapy-Opatovce argues for a division of the cemetery into social groups, as initially suggested by A. Točk.
    Keywords: Western Slovakia, Early Bronze Age, Radiocarbon dating, Nitra culture, Ludanice group, social units, burial index.

    https://www.sav.sk/journals/uploads/...kes_Skorna.pdf

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    A symbolic Neanderthal accumulation of large herbivore crania

    Abstract
    This work examines the possible behaviour of Neanderthal groups at the Cueva Des-Cubierta (central Spain) via the analysis of the latter’s archaeological assemblage. Alongside evidence of Mousterian lithic industry, Level 3 of the cave infill was found to contain an assemblage of mammalian bone remains dominated by the crania of large ungulates, some associated with small hearths. The scarcity of post-cranial elements, teeth, mandibles and maxillae, along with evidence of anthropogenic modification of the crania (cut and percussion marks), indicates that the carcasses of the corresponding animals were initially processed outside the cave, and the crania were later brought inside. A second round of processing then took place, possibly related to the removal of the brain. The continued presence of crania throughout Level 3 indicates that this behaviour was recurrent during this level’s formation. This behaviour seems to have no subsistence-related purpose but to be more symbolic in its intent.


    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-022-01503-7
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