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Thread: New Archeology Papers (Titles and Abstracts Only, Please)

  1. #11
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    WHO WERE THE SOGDIANS, and Why Do They Matter?
    by Judith A. Lerner and Thomas Wide

    https://sogdians.si.edu/introduction/

    The Sogdians were an Iranian people whose homeland, Sogdiana, was located at the center of several of those routes, in present-day Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. First recorded in the 5th century BCE as a province of the Achaemenid Persian Empire FIG. 2, and later conquered by Alexander the Great on his journey east across Asia, Sogdiana reached a peak of wealth and prominence during the 4th into the 8th centuries CE. During this time, Sogdiana was made up of a patchwork of oasis towns and rich agricultural land, uniquely placed between the great empires of the Asian continent; FIG. 3.
    J1 FGC5987 to FGC6175 (188 new SNPs)
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    Y-DNA - Milhazes, Barcelos, Minho, Portugal.
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    North_Swedish + PT + PT + PT @ 3.96 EUtest 4

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  3. #12
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    Late Bronze Age Hittite capital of Hattusha in Turkey

    The agroecology of an early state: new results from Hattusha

    Charlotte Diffey, Reinder Neef, Jürgen Seeher and Amy Bogaard
    DOI: https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2020.172Published online by Cambridge University Press: 10 September 2020
    Abstract


    The discovery of a large underground silo complex with spectacular intact grain stores at the Late Bronze Age Hittite capital of Hattusha in Turkey provides a unique snapshot of the mobilisation of crop production by the Hittite state. A combination of primary archaeobotanical analysis, crop stable isotope determinations and functional weed ecology reveals new insights into Hittite cultivation strategies, featuring a range of relatively low-input, extensive production regimes for hulled wheats and hulled barley. Taxation of extensively produced grain in the sixteenth century BC reveals how an ancient state sought to sustain itself, providing wider implications for the politics and ecology of territorially expansive states in Western Asia and beyond.

    Ancient tax collectors amassed a fortune — until it went up in smoke
    Grain stored in a burnt silo came from multiple farms in an empire in the sixteenth century BC.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

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  5. #13
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    An Oceanographic Perspective on Early Human Migrations to the Américas

    https://tos.org/oceanography/article...o-the-americas

    Early migrants to the Americas were likely seaworthy. Many archaeologists now agree that the first humans who traveled to the Americas more than 15,000 years before present (yr BP) used a coastal North Pacific route. Their initial migration was from northeastern Asia to Beringia where they settled for thousands to more than ten thousand years. Oceanographic conditions during the Last Glacial Maximum (18,000–24,000 yr BP) would have enhanced their boat journeys along the route from Beringia to the Pacific Northwest because the influx of freshwater that drives the opposing Alaska Coastal Current was small, global sea level was at least 120 m lower than at present, and necessary refugia existed. The onset of the Bølling-Allerød warming period, between 15,000 yr BP and 14,000 yr BP, accelerated the melting of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet. Rapid increases in freshwater influx would have hindered travel along the coast of Alaska and British Columbia as global sea levels rose 14–18 m in 340 years, submerging refugia that had been used as haul-out locations. The northward-flowing Alaska Coastal Current accelerated, making southward movement along the coast less likely. An increase in the challenges to migration beginning with the Bølling-Allerød until the Younger Dryas (12,800–11,600 yr BP) likely occurred and could have resulted in a migration hiatus.

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  7. #14
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    The early Aurignacian dispersal of modern humans into westernmost Eurasia

    Jonathan A. Haws, Michael M. Benedetti, Sahra Talamo, Nuno Bicho, João Cascalheira, M. Grace Ellis, Milena M. Carvalho, Lukas Friedl, Telmo Pereira, and Brandon K. Zinsious

    Abstract

    Documenting the first appearance of modern humans in a given region is key to understanding the dispersal process and the replacement or assimilation of indigenous human populations such as the Neanderthals. The Iberian Peninsula was the last refuge of Neanderthal populations as modern humans advanced across Eurasia. Here we present evidence of an early Aurignacian occupation at Lapa do Picareiro in central Portugal. Diagnostic artifacts were found in a sealed stratigraphic layer dated 41.1 to 38.1 ka cal BP, documenting a modern human presence on the western margin of Iberia ∼5,000 years earlier than previously known. The data indicate a rapid modern human dispersal across southern Europe, reaching the westernmost edge where Neanderthals were thought to persist. The results support the notion of a mosaic process of modern human dispersal and replacement of indigenous Neanderthal populations.

    Full text (PDF): https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/ea...62117.full.pdf

    Supplementary materials (PDF): https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/su...62117.sapp.pdf

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  9. #15
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    ... earliest direct evidence of dairy product processing in South Asia

    Compound specific isotope analysis of lipid residues provides the earliest direct evidence of dairy product processing in South Asia
    Kalyan Sekhar Chakraborty, Greg F. Slater, Heather M.-L. Miller, Prabodh Shirvalkar & Yadubirsingh Rawat

    Abstract
    The early evidence of domesticated animals and human–animal interaction in South Asia can be traced back to the seventh millennium BCE; however, our understanding of their use is incomplete and limited to the analysis of animal bones from archaeological sites. By the third millennium BCE with the emergence of the Indus Civilization, cattle and water-buffalo became the primary domesticates and outnumbered any other animals at the majority of the Indus settlements. Based on the analysis of skeletal remains and ethnographic data, a number of studies have suggested that cattle and water-buffalo were utilized for their meat, dairy, hides, and other labor-oriented jobs. While some of these claims are backed by empirical data, others are primarily discussed as hypotheses, for example, the exploitation of dairy. In this paper, by analyzing the absorbed lipid residues from fifty-nine ceramic sherds recovered from an agro-pastoral settlement that was occupied during the peak of the Indus period around mid- to late third millennium BCE, we provide the earliest direct evidence of dairy product processing, particularly from cattle and possibly from some water-buffalo. By providing direct evidence of animal product processing, we identify the use of primary domesticated animals and other resources in the diet during the Indus Civilization.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

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  11. #16
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    Skeleton of Viking child discovered during excavation in Dublin

    Skeleton of Viking child discovered during excavation in Dublin

    Alan Hayden from the UCD School of Archaeology who was leading the dig said the fact that it was not given a proper burial and was dumped in this manner could suggest an act of violence.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

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  13. #17
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    del please

  14. #18
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    ... untouched burial ground of the Scythian time in Khakassia

    Siberian archaeologists have found an untouched burial ground of the Scythian time in Khakassia

    A complex of objects more than two and a half thousand years old: bronze daggers, knives, axes, mirrors, a horny comb - all these things were discovered during rescue excavations in the south of Khakassia by one of the teams of the Askiz archaeological expedition of the IAET SB RAS and OOO Arkhgeoproekt. Near the railway, as part of the large kurgan burial ground Kazanovka 6, experts found a burial object of the Tagar culture (the early Iron Age), in which a burial was found untouched by robbers. In one of the graves, the complete skeletons of four Tagarians were found in the position that it was at the time of burial. The entire inventory was also intact.

    original in Russian, I used Google Translate.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

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  16. #19
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    ... massacre at the Iberian Iron Age village of La Hoya

    Make a desert and call it peace: massacre at the Iberian Iron Age village of La Hoya
    Teresa Fernández-Crespo, Javier Ordoño, Armando Llanos and Rick J. Schulting

    Once considered rare, archaeological examples of violence in prehistoric Europe have accumulated over recent decades, with new discoveries providing evidence of large-scale, organised warfare among pre- and protohistoric populations. One example is La Hoya in north-central Iberia. Between the mid fourth and late third centuries BC, the site was subjected to a violent attack, its inhabitants killed and the settlement burned. Here the authors present osteological analyses for a massacre: decapitations, amputations and other sharp-force injuries affecting a wide cross section of the community. They interpret the massacre as an instance of conflict between rival local communities, contributing to a growing picture of the scale and nature of violence in Iron Age Europe.
    Last edited by pmokeefe; 10-01-2020 at 03:14 PM.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

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  18. #20
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    Earthquake damage as a catalyst to abandonment of a Middle Bronze Age settlement: Tel Kabri, Israel

    Published: September 11, 2020

    For years there has been much speculation surrounding the abandonment of the Middle Bronze Age IIB palace of Tel Kabri, ca. 1700 BCE. There are no weapons, hoards of money and jewelry, or visible evidence for fire, which rules out hostile attack or conquest. There are also no indications of drought or environmental degradation that might have forced the inhabitants to vacate the site, nor mass graveyards to indicate a pandemic. The current study uses micro-geoarchaeological methods to show that the demise of the palace was rapid, with walls and ceilings collapsing at once prior to abandonment. Macroscopic data (stratigraphic and structural) from five excavation seasons were reexamined, showing that at least nine Potential Earthquake Archaeological Effects (PEAEs) are found and associated with the last occupation phase of the site’s palace. All lines of evidence point to the possibility that an earthquake damaged the palace, possibly to a point where it was no longer economically viable to repair. This conclusion is compounded by the discovery of a 1–3 m wide trench that cuts through the palace for 30 m, which may be the result of ground shaking or liquefaction caused by an earthquake. This study shows the importance of combining macro- and micro-archaeological methods for the identification of ancient earthquakes, together with the need to evaluate alternative scenarios of climatic, environmental, and economic collapse, as well as human-induced destruction before a seismic event scenario can be proposed.


    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0239079
    Last edited by JMcB; 10-01-2020 at 05:01 PM.
    Paper Trail: 42.25% English, 31.25% Scottish, 12.5% Irish, 6.25% German, 6.25% Italian & 1.5% French. Or: 86% British Isles, 6.25% German, 6.25% Italian & 1.5% French.
    LDNA(c): 86.3% British Isles (48.6% English, 37.7% Scottish & Irish), 7.8% NW Germanic, 5.9% Europe South (Aegean 3.4%, Tuscany 1.3%, Sardinia 1.1%)
    BigY 700: I1-Z140 >I-F2642 >Y1966 >Y3649 >A13241 >Y3647 >A13248 (circa 620 AD) >A13242/YSEQ (circa 765 AD) >FT80854 (circa 1650 AD).

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