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Thread: Prediction of cardiovascular risk by genetic variants within the LPA gene region

  1. #1
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    Prediction of cardiovascular risk by genetic variants within the LPA gene region

    Prediction of cardiovascular risk by Lp(a) concentrations or genetic variants within the LPA gene region
    Florian Kronenberg
    Abstract
    In the middle of the 1990s the interest in Lp(a) vanished after a few badly performed studies almost erased Lp(a) from the map of biological targets. However, since roughly 10 years the interest has begun to grow again mainly for two reasons: first, genetic studies using easily accessible and high-throughput techniques for genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have allowed large studies in patients with cardiovascular disease and controls to be performed. This strengthened the earlier findings on a copy number variation in the LPA gene and its association with cardiovascular outcomes. Second, new therapies are on the horizon raising strong and justified hope that in a few years drugs will become available which tremendously lower Lp(a) concentrations. This review article should provide an introduction to the genetic determination of Lp(a) concentrations and considerations whether Lp(a) concentrations or genetic variants are important for the prediction of cardiovascular risk.

    Two variants mentioned in the paper sometimes appear in consumer DNA tests:
    RSID:other>risk
    rs10455872:A>G 23andMe{v5,v4}, AncestryDNA(sometimes)
    rs3798220:T>C 23andMe, AncestryDNA

    Unfortunately I have one copy of the risk allele for rs10455872.

    I have only become aware of this recently and have started diving into the research about Lp(a) in general and rs10455872 in particular.

    If you do have a risk variant, please feel free to contact me by PM or respond to this thread.

    For a vivid graphic of the consequences associated with rs10455872, follow this link to the excellent Finnish site FINNGEN.
    http://r3.finngen.fi/variant/6-160589086-A-G
    Last edited by pmokeefe; 11-17-2020 at 09:21 PM.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     parasar (11-17-2020)

  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmokeefe View Post
    Prediction of cardiovascular risk by Lp(a) concentrations or genetic variants within the LPA gene region
    Florian Kronenberg
    Abstract
    In the middle of the 1990s the interest in Lp(a) vanished after a few badly performed studies almost erased Lp(a) from the map of biological targets. However, since roughly 10 years the interest has begun to grow again mainly for two reasons: first, genetic studies using easily accessible and high-throughput techniques for genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have allowed large studies in patients with cardiovascular disease and controls to be performed. This strengthened the earlier findings on a copy number variation in the LPA gene and its association with cardiovascular outcomes. Second, new therapies are on the horizon raising strong and justified hope that in a few years drugs will become available which tremendously lower Lp(a) concentrations. This review article should provide an introduction to the genetic determination of Lp(a) concentrations and considerations whether Lp(a) concentrations or genetic variants are important for the prediction of cardiovascular risk.

    Two variants mentioned in the paper sometimes appear in consumer DNA tests:
    RSID:other>risk
    rs10455872:A>G 23andMe
    rs3798220:T>C 23andMe, AncestryDNA

    Unfortunately I have one copy of the risk allele for rs10455872.

    I have only become aware of this recently and have started diving into the research about Lp(a) in general and rs10455872 in particular.

    If you do have a risk variant, please feel free to contact me by PM or respond to this thread.

    For a vivid graphic of the consequences associated with rs10455872, follow this link to the excellent Finnish site FINNGEN.
    http://r3.finngen.fi/variant/6-160589086-A-G
    23andme V2
    rs3798220 T,T
    rs10455872 not available

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to parasar For This Useful Post:

     pmokeefe (11-17-2020),  rms2 (11-18-2020)

  5. #3
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    R1b-Z253>BY93500
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    K1a1a

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    rs10455872: A/A
    rs3798220: T/T

    Phew! That's a relief!

    However, I had a heart attack back in 2014 and have a stent. I also have AFIB, which is just so much fun.

    I was seriously overweight back when I had the heart attack. I consumed a lot of really bad junk - sugar, white flour, loads of other carbs - back then.

    Now I am about one hundred pounds lighter than I was in 2014.

  6. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to rms2 For This Useful Post:

     cvolt (11-23-2020),  Jokli (11-19-2020),  parasar (11-18-2020),  pmokeefe (11-23-2020),  Radboud (11-19-2020),  Webb (11-20-2020)

  7. #4
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    Not sure what this means?

    rs10455872 6 161010118 AA

  8. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Nqp15hhu For This Useful Post:

     parasar (11-18-2020),  pmokeefe (11-23-2020),  rms2 (11-26-2020)

  9. #5
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    Ireland Ireland Connacht Ireland County Roscommon Ireland County Galway Ireland County Mayo
    I am rs10455872 AA and rs3798220 TT.
    All is well. Thankfully, touch wood, I don't know of anyone in my family who has had a heart attack. I always thought that my grandfather could have lived to a great age if he looked after himself. He was obese and didn't have a healthy lifestyle but still lived to 82. He started losing weight but people kept asking if he was sick so he gave up on that. My grandfather's sister is 94, his brother is 91 and another sister is 88. As long as they manage to avoid getting cancer, they seem to live to a great age. Even then, the youngest death was in the 70s so it wasn't too bad.
    Ancestry: Ireland (Paper trail ≅ 81.25% Roscommon, 12.5% Galway, 6.25% Mayo)
    Y-DNA (P) ancestor (Y): Kelly b. c1830 in Co. Roscommon (Uí Maine)
    mtDNA (P) ancestor: Fleming b. c1831 in Co. Roscommon
    mtDNA (M) ancestor: McDermott b. c1814 in Co. Roscommon
    mtDNA Great grandfather: Connella b. c1798 in Co. Roscommon (T2a1a8)
    Y-DNA 2x great grandfather: Higgins b. c1816 in Co. Roscommon (R-DF109)
    Y-DNA 3x great grandfather: Fleming b. c1829 in Co. Roscommon (R-Z23534)

  10. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to FionnSneachta For This Useful Post:

     Jokli (11-19-2020),  pmokeefe (11-23-2020),  rms2 (11-26-2020)

  11. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nqp15hhu View Post
    Not sure what this means?

    rs10455872 6 161010118 AA
    You have two copies of the nonrisk variant for rs10455872. That is good!
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     rms2 (11-26-2020)

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