Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: Origins and genetic legacy of prehistoric dogs

  1. #1
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    578
    Sex
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Ethnicity
    Polish/British Isles
    Nationality
    U.S.
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-A9185
    mtDNA (M)
    H1
    mtDNA (P)
    J1c2

    Poland England Ireland Munster

    Origins and genetic legacy of prehistoric dogs

    Origins and genetic legacy of prehistoric dogs
    Bergström et al.

    Dog domestication was multifaceted
    Dogs were the first domesticated animal, likely originating from human-associated wolves, but their origin remains unclear. Bergstrom et al. sequenced 27 ancient dog genomes from multiple locations near to and corresponding in time to comparable human ancient DNA sites (see the Perspective by Pavlidis and Somel). By analyzing these genomes, along with other ancient and modern dog genomes, the authors found that dogs likely arose once from a now-extinct wolf population. They also found that at least five different dog populations ∼10,000 years before the present show replacement in Europe at later dates. Furthermore, some dog population genetics are similar to those of humans, whereas others differ, inferring a complex ancestral history for humanity's best friend.


    Abstract
    Dogs were the first domestic animal, but little is known about their population history and to what extent it was linked to humans. We sequenced 27 ancient dog genomes and found that all dogs share a common ancestry distinct from present-day wolves, with limited gene flow from wolves since domestication but substantial dog-to-wolf gene flow. By 11,000 years ago, at least five major ancestry lineages had diversified, demonstrating a deep genetic history of dogs during the Paleolithic. Coanalysis with human genomes reveals aspects of dog population history that mirror humans, including Levant-related ancestry in Africa and early agricultural Europe. Other aspects differ, including the impacts of steppe pastoralist expansions in West and East Eurasia and a near-complete turnover of Neolithic European dog ancestry.

    PrehistoricDogs.jpg
    Fig. 1Genomic structure of dogs dates to the Pleistocene.(A) Sampling locations of ancient dogs. k, 1000 years. (B ) PCA results for all possible f4-statistics among ancient dogs (gray) and a selection of worldwide modern dogs. (C) Outgroup f3-statistics reveal a cline of Levant-related versus Baikal-related (horizontal and vertical axes, respectively) ancestry across ancient West Eurasian dogs, but not among modern European dogs. (D) Coalescent simulations demonstrating that a diagonal f3 cline as in (C) is consistent with an admixture event, but less so with continuous gene flow and not with phylogenetic structure alone. (E) An admixture graph that fits all f4-statistics between major dog lineages. The European dog was grafted onto the graph identified through exhaustive testing. kya, 1000 years ago



    Of dogs and men
    Pavlos Pavlidis, Mehmet Somel
    --- overview of the paper
    Last edited by pmokeefe; 10-29-2020 at 06:54 PM.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  2. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     blackflash16 (10-29-2020),  Dieu (10-30-2020),  discreetmaverick (11-01-2020),  Helen (10-30-2020),  Lenny Nero (10-29-2020),  Mansamusa (10-30-2020),  pegasus (10-30-2020),  Piquerobi (10-29-2020),  razyn (10-29-2020),  RCO (10-29-2020)

  3. #2
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    578
    Sex
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Ethnicity
    Polish/British Isles
    Nationality
    U.S.
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-A9185
    mtDNA (M)
    H1
    mtDNA (P)
    J1c2

    Poland England Ireland Munster
    Ancient dog DNA reveals 11,000 years of canine evolution
    Genomes trace how the animals moved around the world — often with humans by their side.
    Ewen Callaway
    --- news article in Nature

    Twitter thread about the article by Pontus Skoglund, one of the coauthors:
    https://twitter.com/pontus_skoglund/...75099348324358
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     Helen (10-30-2020),  RCO (10-29-2020)

  5. #3
    Registered Users
    Posts
    253
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    1/2 Italian, 1/2 Armenian
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U152
    mtDNA (M)
    H5a

    Interesting. I'm more curious about the original domestication events though.

  6. #4
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    578
    Sex
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Ethnicity
    Polish/British Isles
    Nationality
    U.S.
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-A9185
    mtDNA (M)
    H1
    mtDNA (P)
    J1c2

    Poland England Ireland Munster
    Quote Originally Posted by davit View Post
    Interesting. I'm more curious about the original domestication events though.
    "We find that the modern and ancient genomic data are consistent with a single origin for dogs, though a scenario involving multiple closely related wolf populations remains possible. However, in our view, the geographical origin of dogs remains unknown."
    --- Discussion section of the paper
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     Helen (10-30-2020)

  8. #5
    Global Moderator
    Posts
    773
    Sex
    Location
    EU
    Ethnicity
    Finnish
    Y-DNA (P)
    Father N1c
    mtDNA (M)
    I5a

    The order of separation in the paper is this: New Guinea dogs, American dogs, Baikal dogs, Karelia dogs and Levant dogs. In the admixture analysis African Basenji dogs are descendants of Levant dogs. Karelian dogs are mixed between western (European) and Asian dogs. Modern European dogs are mixed between ancient European and Levant dogs. Ancient Iranian dogs are mixed between Levant and Siberian dogs with a little bit of European ancestry.

    If we compare this order of separation to humans, e.g. to human yDNA or mtDNA trees, we should conclude that dogs were domesticated in northern Eurasia, as the deepest splits are in Asia.

    According to the paper, "the >40-ka-ago divergence of human East and West Eurasian ancestries (47) is markedly older than the earliest appearance of dog morphology in the fossil record, conservatively dated to 14.5 ka ago (48), although older (3, 31), disputed (49, 50) specimens have been claimed."

    If I try to fit the 14,5 kya separation time to human migration patterns, the following picture emerges. (A part of) Native Americans go to America together with dogs only after 14,5 kya. Before and after that there are two migrations to East Asia, the first ca 14,5 kya and the second from Baikal ca 10 kya. As for the western dogs, this model predicts that there is a migration of humans from Siberia to Europe after 14,5 kya and this migration would take the dogs to the Levant at the latest 7 kya.

    I find this scheme quite tight and I doubt that the differences between dog breeds in different continents could have been so well established in only 5 000 years.

    I hope that older dog samples can be obtained in order to clarify the issue.

  9. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Kristiina For This Useful Post:

     Helen (10-30-2020),  Lenny Nero (10-30-2020),  pmokeefe (10-30-2020),  Prometheus (10-30-2020)

  10. #6
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    578
    Sex
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Ethnicity
    Polish/British Isles
    Nationality
    U.S.
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-A9185
    mtDNA (M)
    H1
    mtDNA (P)
    J1c2

    Poland England Ireland Munster

    Dog domestication and megafauna extinctions?

    Dog domestication and various megafauna extinction events seem to have occurred in roughly the same timeframe.
    Could that have been a significant factor in the extinctions?

    How do you kill 86 mammoths? Taphonomic investigations of mammoth megasites
    by Pat Shipman

    Did Dogs Help Drive Mammoths to Their Graves?
    Report about the Shipman article in Science.

    However, this critique:
    Comment on “How do you kill 86 mammoths? Taphonomic investigations of mammoth megasites” by Pat Shipman

    Any other scientific articles about dogs and the extinctions of mammoths or other species?
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     discreetmaverick (11-01-2020),  pegasus (10-30-2020)

  12. #7
    Global Moderator
    Posts
    773
    Sex
    Location
    EU
    Ethnicity
    Finnish
    Y-DNA (P)
    Father N1c
    mtDNA (M)
    I5a

    I took a look at the results of the mitochondrial DNA paper published earlier this year (Ancient DNA Evidence from China Reveals the Expansion of Pacific Dogs).

    Ancient DNA evidence from China reveals the expansion of Pacific dog 2020.GIF

    There seems to be a lot of mtDNA variation in China compared to other continents. An ancient dog in New Siberian Islands (9,5-8,5 kya) carries the same haplotype as dogs in America. This haplotype reached also China in ancient times. An ancient dog in Zhejiang (7 kya) carries the same haplotype as dogs in Australia and in Pacific Islands. This oldest mtDNA haplotype in Asia, A1b, is a parallel branch of the European A1a.

    This paper also supports the origin of dogs in Asia.

  13. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Kristiina For This Useful Post:

     pegasus (10-30-2020),  pmokeefe (10-30-2020),  Ryukendo (10-30-2020)

  14. #8
    Registered Users
    Posts
    253
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    1/2 Italian, 1/2 Armenian
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U152
    mtDNA (M)
    H5a

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristiina View Post
    The order of separation in the paper is this: New Guinea dogs, American dogs, Baikal dogs, Karelia dogs and Levant dogs. In the admixture analysis African Basenji dogs are descendants of Levant dogs. Karelian dogs are mixed between western (European) and Asian dogs. Modern European dogs are mixed between ancient European and Levant dogs. Ancient Iranian dogs are mixed between Levant and Siberian dogs with a little bit of European ancestry.

    If we compare this order of separation to humans, e.g. to human yDNA or mtDNA trees, we should conclude that dogs were domesticated in northern Eurasia, as the deepest splits are in Asia.

    According to the paper, "the >40-ka-ago divergence of human East and West Eurasian ancestries (47) is markedly older than the earliest appearance of dog morphology in the fossil record, conservatively dated to 14.5 ka ago (48), although older (3, 31), disputed (49, 50) specimens have been claimed."

    If I try to fit the 14,5 kya separation time to human migration patterns, the following picture emerges. (A part of) Native Americans go to America together with dogs only after 14,5 kya. Before and after that there are two migrations to East Asia, the first ca 14,5 kya and the second from Baikal ca 10 kya. As for the western dogs, this model predicts that there is a migration of humans from Siberia to Europe after 14,5 kya and this migration would take the dogs to the Levant at the latest 7 kya.

    I find this scheme quite tight and I doubt that the differences between dog breeds in different continents could have been so well established in only 5 000 years.

    I hope that older dog samples can be obtained in order to clarify the issue.

    That's interesting. I think the consensus was that European dogs were largely replaced by East Asian dogs really recently. Cool to see that European dogs do descend from ancient European dogs in part.

    Is this model suggesting a migration from Siberia to the Levant too?

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to davit For This Useful Post:

     Saetro (11-01-2020)

  16. #9
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    4,058
    Location
    Shangri La

    Afghanistan Jammu and Kashmir United States of America Canada
    Nice map, much of this indeed mirrors human population movements lol

    Interestingly, Chihuahuas are almost entirely European descended contrary to the belief they were Meso-American dogs.

    Last edited by pegasus; 10-30-2020 at 07:05 PM.

  17. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to pegasus For This Useful Post:

     davit (10-30-2020),  Dieu (10-30-2020),  discreetmaverick (11-01-2020),  pmokeefe (10-30-2020),  Prometheus (10-30-2020),  Ryukendo (10-30-2020)

  18. #10
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,060
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristiina View Post
    I took a look at the results of the mitochondrial DNA paper published earlier this year (Ancient DNA Evidence from China Reveals the Expansion of Pacific Dogs).

    Ancient DNA evidence from China reveals the expansion of Pacific dog 2020.GIF

    There seems to be a lot of mtDNA variation in China compared to other continents. An ancient dog in New Siberian Islands (9,5-8,5 kya) carries the same haplotype as dogs in America. This haplotype reached also China in ancient times. An ancient dog in Zhejiang (7 kya) carries the same haplotype as dogs in Australia and in Pacific Islands. This oldest mtDNA haplotype in Asia, A1b, is a parallel branch of the European A1a.

    This paper also supports the origin of dogs in Asia.
    Nice point Kristiina!
    Another evidence of this is in the admixture graph, which shows New Guinean singing dogs as the most deeply diverging among all dogs--the phylogeography suggests that the "Pacific dog" (Neu Guinean dogs and Australian Dingoes) population originated in China and European, Baikal and Steppe clade ancestries subsequently entered China and displaced much of the "Pacific dog" ancestry there. This "Pacific ancestry" seems to exceed 50% only in Korean Jindo, Japanese Inus and Chinese village dogs...

    Of course it could be the case that the domestication took place elsewhere, but every other population other than those that root in China died out.

    Interestingly the most "Steppe"-related dog is actually the Tibetan Mastiff, one of the so-called "ancient breeds" from China--this forms not a clade with other ancient breeds such as Pekingnese, Shar Pei etc. but is more related to the Srubnaya dog, interesting.
    Quoted from this Forum:

    "Which superman haplogroup is the toughest - R1a or R1b? And which SNP mutation spoke Indo-European first? There's only one way for us to find out ... fight!"

  19. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Ryukendo For This Useful Post:

     discreetmaverick (11-01-2020),  jadegreg (10-31-2020),  Kristiina (10-30-2020),  Megalophias (10-30-2020),  Saetro (11-01-2020)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Roman Britain - the Genetic Legacy. Discuss
    By A Norfolk L-M20 in forum History (Ancient)
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 02-20-2019, 09:49 PM
  2. Prehistoric Hunting with dogs in Japan.
    By JohnHowellsTyrfro in forum Fauna
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-20-2016, 09:21 PM
  3. Dog Wars - Origins of domesticated dogs.
    By JohnHowellsTyrfro in forum Fauna
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 08-07-2016, 08:37 PM
  4. Replies: 44
    Last Post: 06-17-2016, 07:44 AM
  5. Neanderthals' genetic legacy
    By Jean M in forum Human Evolution
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 01-31-2014, 01:37 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •