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Thread: MahaBharatha

  1. #1
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    MahaBharatha

    A thread dedicated to Mahabharatha could be useful for

    - understanding any possible history and population movements.
    - for deeper and continuity of related discussions.
    - accidentally deviating from the purpose of other threads.
    - Sharing useful resources.
    - verify claims made from and about Mahabhatha.
    - a reading group.
    - possibly some more.

    Here are some of the online resources available in English.

    This has most of the 18 books.

    https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Mahabharat

    Jain Mahabharata

    http://www.jainpedia.org/themes/prin...abharatas.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by vishankar View Post
    yes...mostly nagas were a pre-aryan people!....when the indo-aryans came to India and the subcontinent, there are frequent references to conflicts with Nagas-burning of Khandava forest by Bhagwan Krishna and Arjun,the naga extermination by Parikshit....but also there were intermarriages- arjun with uloopi, being one example...the snake worshippers were also tillers of the land , in all probabiltiy....
    The Mahabharata states that Indra was the protecting deity (deva) of Khandava forest, which is why the region was known as Indraprastha.[3] When the forest was being burned, Indra attacked Arjuna with his bolt (vajra), injuring him.[4] But Arjuna defeated all gods, Gandharvas and demons in that fierce battle and burnt the entire forest.[5]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khandava_Forest

    As per this study, shared on this thread as well

    https://anthrogenica.com/showthread....People-of-BMAC

    https://brill.com/view/book/9789004438200/BP000002.xml

    Both Indra and Gandhwara were BMAC gods, which Arjuna defeated and

    They also borrowed words related to water supply: *khā ‘source’,
    *khā ‘source’, in BMAC related, maybe Khandava forest was a source to some river, as forests and mountain are sources of rivers.

    Kha in Khandava is a Mahaprana doesn't exist Dravidian languages - Tamil and Tulu, which could be a BMAC language feature as I discussed here

    https://anthrogenica.com/showthread....l=1#post709981

    could it be fight between Indo Europeans and BMAC people?
    Last edited by discreetmaverick; 11-02-2020 at 02:46 PM.

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    Pakistan Azad Kashmir India
    Given that Mahabharata is of much later origin, likely during or several centuries after the Gupta period, and its content vaguely conscious of the geography of the region, it shouldn't be approached as a historic document. It will be perilous to refer to it so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rahuls77 View Post
    Given that Mahabharata is of much later origin, likely during or several centuries after the Gupta period, and its content vaguely conscious of the geography of the region, it shouldn't be approached as a historic document. It will be perilous to refer to it so.
    Can you explain how is it several centuries after the Gupta period?

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    Quote Originally Posted by discreetmaverick View Post
    Can you explain how is it several centuries after the Gupta period?
    Mahabararat is from the Itihas tradition - parts of its traditions are older than the Ved, but it has been updated frequently - even as late as the Gupt period.
    We know from Panini that many of its characters as well as the compilation were well known to him - Arjun, Vasudev, etc. come to mind.
    On the other hand my analysis of word forms indicates it to be older than Rg Ved Book VII.

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    Quote Originally Posted by parasar View Post
    Mahabararat is from the Itihas tradition - parts of its traditions are older than the Ved, but it has been updated frequently - even as late as the Gupt period.
    We know from Panini that many of its characters as well as the compilation were well known to him - Arjun, Vasudev, etc. come to mind.
    On the other hand my analysis of word forms indicates it to be older than Rg Ved Book VII.
    Can you explain your analysis of the word forms which indicates it older than Rg Ved Book VII and some details about Rg Ved Book VII
    Last edited by discreetmaverick; 11-03-2020 at 03:42 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by discreetmaverick View Post
    A thread dedicated to Mahabharatha could be useful for

    - understanding any possible history and population movements.
    - for deeper and continuity of related discussions.
    - accidentally deviating from the purpose of other threads.
    - Sharing useful resources.
    - verify claims made from and about Mahabhatha.
    - a reading group.
    - possibly some more.

    Here are some of the online resources available in English.

    This has most of the 18 books.

    https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Mahabharat

    Jain Mahabharata

    http://www.jainpedia.org/themes/prin...abharatas.html
    What does the Buddhist literature say about MahaBharta?

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    Quote Originally Posted by discreetmaverick View Post
    Can you explain your analysis of the word forms which indicates it older than Rg Ved Book VII and some details about Rg Ved Book VII
    An analysis of my pravar Parasar under the Vasisth gotr (Book VII is a book of the Vasisths). The Vasisths were, IMO, responsible for one version of the Mahabharat - thus the prominence of Parasar pravar and Vyas (aka Parasarya).

    The Rg Veda mentions the Parasar name twice, once in adjective form, and once as a noun.

    1. Book 7.104.21.1-2 indro yatunamabhavat parasaro havirmathinamabhyavivasatam abhidu sakrah parasuryatha vanam patreva bhindan sata eti raksasah (cf AV6.65.11) - Indra is the parasara to those (the rakshasas) who spoil oblations of the Gods' invokers,
    2. Book 07.018.21.1 pra ye grhadamamadustvaya parasarah satayaturvasisthah – They who, from home, have gladdened you, your servants Parasara, Satayatu-Vasistha. I will call this Parasara of Sudas as this section is in reference to Sudas ("easy for Sudas to traverse"), geographically in the Ravi river region ("they sought Parushni").

    Furthermore, the Anukramani mentions a Parasar as author of hymn 9.97 and hymns 65 to 73 to Parasar Saktya (i.e. Parasar son of Sakti). The Rg Veda itself never mentions any Sakti, but the Purans clearly do.

    Parasaro is an adjective is being used to describe Indra - as a killer of rakshasas.

    That killer of rakshashas is Parasar Sakti whose story is told in the Mahabharat. The Rg Veda by using the name as an adjective is recognizing the preexitence of the Mahabharat story.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jatt1 View Post
    What does the Buddhist literature say about MahaBharta?
    I did search for Buddhist of Mahabharata, but it doesn't seem to exist. But as per a quora user, Mahabharata stories appear in Buddist stories with different names

    https://www.quora.com/Is-there-a-men...at-in-buddhism

    Quote Originally Posted by parasar View Post
    That killer of rakshashas is Parasar Sakti whose story is told in the Mahabharat.
    Can you mention which Book/Parva and section has this story?

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    Quote Originally Posted by discreetmaverick View Post
    I did search for Buddhist of Mahabharata, but it doesn't seem to exist. But as per a quora user, Mahabharata stories appear in Buddist stories with different names

    https://www.quora.com/Is-there-a-men...at-in-buddhism



    Can you mention which Book/Parva and section has this story?
    Book 1 Chaitraratha Parva
    The story of Parasar Sakti (i.e. Parasar the son of Sakti) is told here:
    "And remembering the slaughter of [his father] Saktri, the great Muni [Parasara] began to consume the Rakshasas, young and old, in the sacrifice he performed ... that mighty Muni--the son of Saktri then brought that sacrifice to an end. And the Rishi cast the fire that he had ignited for the purpose of the Rakshasas' sacrifice into the deep woods on the north of the Himavat. And that fire may be seen to this day consuming Rakshasas and trees and stones in all seasons.'"
    https://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/m01/m01184.htm

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