Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910
Results 91 to 99 of 99

Thread: Genomic Insights into the Formation of Human Populations in East Asia[

  1. #91
    Registered Users
    Posts
    206
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by Pribislav View Post
    Probably the most interesting discovery so far, Chemurchek sample that belongs to an extremely rare subclade directly below Z2103, and parallel to the much more numerous and widespread M12149:


    I12978; 2570-2476 BC; Yagshiin khodoo, Bulgan sum, Khovd aimag, Mongolia; Chemurchek_EBA; R1b1a1a2a2-Z2103>FT130482 (xFT130500)


    Z2103 level: Z2103/CTS1078+ G>C (2C)

    FT130482 level: FT130482+ A>G (2G); FT165136+ A>T (1T)

    FT130482>FT130500 level: FT130139- G>C (1G); FT130338- A>G (2A); FT130526- G>A (1G); FT130641- T>A (7T); FT130820- A>G (1A); FT130986- T>C (2T); FT131378- A>G (1A); FT132114- C>T (1C)

    FT130482>FTA3897 level: *no calls*
    So there was migration from Baikal_EN to the south? Would this bring ANE ancestry into present-day Mongolians as well? I think they have some

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Max_H For This Useful Post:

     Hando (03-13-2021)

  3. #92
    Registered Users
    Posts
    556
    Sex
    Location
    Moscow
    Ethnicity
    East Europe + Finland
    Nationality
    Russian
    Y-DNA (P)
    N-Z1936-Y19110
    mtDNA (M)
    H2a5b

    Russian Federation
    How old are the oldest Homo sapiens in Far East Asia?

    View ORCID ProfileJean-Jacques Hublin
    aDepartment of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig 04103, Germany;
    bChaire de Paléoanthropologie, Collège de France, 75005 Paris, France


    To date, therefore, one can speculate that our species possibly reached east Asia before 55,000 or 50,000 y ago but maybe not much before.


    https://www.pnas.org/content/118/10/e2101173118

  4. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to VladimirTaraskin For This Useful Post:

     Hando (03-13-2021),  Lenny Nero (03-15-2021),  Milkyway (03-10-2021),  parasar (03-10-2021),  theplayer (03-10-2021)

  5. #93
    Registered Users
    Posts
    781
    Sex
    Location
    Belgrade
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Nationality
    Serb
    Y-DNA (P)
    PH908>A5913>A22312

    Serbia Montenegro Bosnia and Herzegovina Croatia Split-Dalmatia
    Quote Originally Posted by Pribislav View Post
    I7022; 391-209 BC; Ulaangom cemetery, Chandman Uul, Ulaangom sum, Uvs aimag, Mongolia; Sagly_IA; Q1a1b1-M25>L712>pre-YP832


    YP832 level: YP6107+ C>A (3A); YP828+ C>A (2A); YP851+ C>T (3T); YP6111+ G>A (1A); YP801+ G>A (1A); YP4269+ G>A (2A); Y19343+ A>C (1C); YP794- A>C (1A); YP847- A>T (4A); Y149317- C>A (3C); YP805- T>A (3T)
    Updated with new SNPs from FTDNA Block Tree:

    I7022; 391-209 BC; Ulaangom cemetery, Chandman Uul, Ulaangom sum, Uvs aimag, Mongolia; Sagly_IA; Q1a1b1-M25>L712>YP832>FT394000>FT414149


    FT394000 level: BY164935+ G>C (1C); FT394008+ G>C (1C); FT413519+ T>C (1C); FT413520+ G>A (1A); FT414169+ T>C (3C)

    FT414149 level: FT414149+ G>C (1C); FT413019+ C>T (6T); FT413575+ T>C (5C); FT414825+ C>A (2A); FT414826+ G>T (1T); FT414851? A>T (3T-3A)


    Karasuk sample RISE493 (1531-1427 BC; Sabinka 2, Khakasiya) also belongs to this subclade.

  6. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Pribislav For This Useful Post:

     Afshar (04-06-2021),  Agamemnon (04-05-2021),  aganmu (04-05-2021),  altvred (04-05-2021),  Ebizur (04-05-2021),  Hando (05-21-2021),  JMcB (04-05-2021),  parasar (04-05-2021),  Radboud (04-05-2021),  Ryukendo (04-05-2021)

  7. #94
    Registered Users
    Posts
    206
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard23 View Post
    I think the author underestimated the split time between Korean-Japanese and the mainland people.

    O1b-P49 is a characteristic Y haplogroup in Korea-Japan,TMRCA~20kya,They may have entered the Korean peninsula from a land bridge during the ice age.But Hongshan culture formed six thousand years ago(West Liao River),the most haplotypes are y-N, which is minor in Korea-Japan.In genome PCA of other studys, Korean-Japanese is separated from other east asians.

    Refer to other paper (Genomic Insights into the Demographic History of Southern Chinese ) Fig3C-Coalescent analysis using SFS of rare alleles to calibrate the time of the major splits in East Asians.The Inland Southern East Asian split from Coastal east asian about 16kya, I think the same method could be used to estimate the split time between K-J and the mainland people.
    Is it possible that inland southern East Asian is a mix of inland northern East Asian and Coastal East Asian? It's the impression I get at least.

    Also, when do you think that European-related gene flow entered the island south-east Asian lineage? I read it as 580 years ago but could be mistaken.
    Last edited by Max_H; 05-17-2021 at 09:35 PM.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Max_H For This Useful Post:

     Hando (05-21-2021)

  9. #95
    Registered Users
    Posts
    22
    Sex
    Location
    China
    Ethnicity
    Han-Manchuria
    Y-DNA (P)
    O1b-M95

    China
    Quote Originally Posted by Max_H View Post
    Is it possible that inland southern East Asian is a mix of inland northern East Asian and Coastal East Asian? It's the impression I get at least.

    Also, when do you think that European-related gene flow entered the island south-east Asian lineage? I read it as 580 years ago but could be mistaken.
    I agree with you on the origin of the southern East Asians. Modern East Asians may have expanded from north to South, or from west to East and entered the south of the Yangtze River in multiple waves. The southeast asia Hoabinhians are Onge-like, and the skulls of the early Southern ancients did not look like modern East Asians, so the possibility of modern East Asians coming from the south is very small. Precious living fossils are preserved in the isolated islands around eastern Eurasia, which can supplement the lack of ancient DNA. When the ice age came, the sea level dropped, and the Korean Peninsula and Taiwan became part of the coast. By comparing the genetic records of the isolated island and the mainland population, I think that coastal populations retain more of the remnants of early expansion than inland.

    My knowledge is limited, and I don't notice any southeast population which has a significant mix of European component. I'm curious about how Maori are formed. They seem to have half of the European ancestry, but they don't belong to Southeast Asia.

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Howard23 For This Useful Post:

     Hando (05-21-2021),  Max_H (05-20-2021)

  11. #96
    Registered Users
    Posts
    225
    Sex
    Omitted
    Ethnicity
    Mostly Chinese
    Nationality
    USA

    United States of America China
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard23 View Post
    I agree with you on the origin of the southern East Asians. Modern East Asians may have expanded from north to South, or from west to East and entered the south of the Yangtze River in multiple waves. The southeast asia Hoabinhians are Onge-like, and the skulls of the early Southern ancients did not look like modern East Asians, so the possibility of modern East Asians coming from the south is very small. Precious living fossils are preserved in the isolated islands around eastern Eurasia, which can supplement the lack of ancient DNA. When the ice age came, the sea level dropped, and the Korean Peninsula and Taiwan became part of the coast. By comparing the genetic records of the isolated island and the mainland population, I think that coastal populations retain more of the remnants of early expansion than inland.

    My knowledge is limited, and I don't notice any southeast population which has a significant mix of European component. I'm curious about how Maori are formed. They seem to have half of the European ancestry, but they don't belong to Southeast Asia.
    I agree with this. The initial migration of the ancestors of modern-day East Asians was probably from south to north, but modern-day Southeast Asians are mostly descended from north-to-south migrations from prehistoric/Ice Age Southern China.



    source

    The Maori sample has to be Euro-mixed.

  12. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to okarinaofsteiner For This Useful Post:

     Hando (05-21-2021),  Howard23 (05-19-2021),  Max_H (05-20-2021)

  13. #97
    Registered Users
    Posts
    206
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard23 View Post
    I agree with you on the origin of the southern East Asians. Modern East Asians may have expanded from north to South, or from west to East and entered the south of the Yangtze River in multiple waves. The southeast asia Hoabinhians are Onge-like, and the skulls of the early Southern ancients did not look like modern East Asians, so the possibility of modern East Asians coming from the south is very small. Precious living fossils are preserved in the isolated islands around eastern Eurasia, which can supplement the lack of ancient DNA. When the ice age came, the sea level dropped, and the Korean Peninsula and Taiwan became part of the coast. By comparing the genetic records of the isolated island and the mainland population, I think that coastal populations retain more of the remnants of early expansion than inland.

    My knowledge is limited, and I don't notice any southeast population which has a significant mix of European component. I'm curious about how Maori are formed. They seem to have half of the European ancestry, but they don't belong to Southeast Asia.
    I know Thai, Bhutanese, Burmese and Cambodians have some minor Indian admixture which may appear as European in analyses.
    But I was mostly referring to figure 3C from "Genomic Insights into the Demographic History of Southern Chinese". You can see here ( https://ibb.co/4PVgXZd ) a European-related gene flow into the inland southern East Asian branch, dated I think to 500 years ago or so.

    Regarding the coastal branch another interesting thing is how old it is in East Asia, especially in Tibet. It would seem as if later East Asian ancestries isolated it in Tibet and Japan as well as the far south.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Max_H For This Useful Post:

     Hando (05-21-2021)

  15. #98
    Registered Users
    Posts
    442
    Location
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    H-Z4417
    mtDNA (M)
    M3d

    Quote Originally Posted by Max_H View Post
    I know Thai, Bhutanese, Burmese and Cambodians have some minor Indian admixture which may appear as European in analyses.
    But I was mostly referring to figure 3C from "Genomic Insights into the Demographic History of Southern Chinese". You can see here ( https://ibb.co/4PVgXZd ) a European-related gene flow into the inland southern East Asian branch, dated I think to 500 years ago or so.
    On the topic of European gene flow into Chinese, I am surprised to see a Chinese sample ("Yue" speaker) in the ydna clade H-Z41291 in YFull. It shares the clade with a Romanian and a Kuwaiti. Looks like the clade trifurcated around 10,600 bp.
    Wonder how it got to China. Could be recent too (colonial era traders?).
    Last edited by thejkhan; 05-20-2021 at 10:59 PM.

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to thejkhan For This Useful Post:

     Hando (05-21-2021),  Max_H (05-20-2021)

  17. #99
    Registered Users
    Posts
    206
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by thejkhan View Post
    On the topic of European gene flow into Chinese, I am surprised to see a Chinese sample ("Yue" speaker) in the ydna clade H-Z41291 in YFull. It shares the clade with a Romanian and a Kuwaiti. Looks like the clade trifurcated around 10,600 bp.
    Wonder how it got to China. Could be recent too (colonial era traders?).
    I'd think this is shared ancestry in these individuals from India but I realized this lineage is not the south Asian one lol. I too think it's recent in China, especially considering that the province of Guangdong had experienced foreign trade there since antiquity and if I recall correctly there were even Muslim trader communities there from the Middle East going all the way back to the Tang dynasty. So it's very likely from a trader in the region.
    Last edited by Max_H; 05-20-2021 at 11:30 PM.

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to Max_H For This Useful Post:

     thejkhan (05-20-2021)

Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 91
    Last Post: 02-11-2021, 06:30 AM
  2. Replies: 304
    Last Post: 10-19-2020, 01:42 PM
  3. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-21-2020, 09:38 AM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-07-2019, 04:41 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-03-2017, 12:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •