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Thread: Toponymic Surnames in your Family Tree?

  1. #1
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    Toponymic Surnames in your Family Tree?

    Any toponymic surnames in your family tree? Please post them in this thread!

    Stinchcombe is the name of a village in Gloucestershire, England
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinchcombe

    While I'm American, a distant Stinchcomb ancestor emigrated from a village in Gloucestershire nearby Stinchcombe.
    I have no current family connection to the region. But coincidentally I have a friend who lives near Stinchcombe in the Cotswolds. I have spent quite a bit of time in the area visiting my friend and have driven by Stinchcombe often, without realizing I had an ancestral connection there.

    It's also possible that Harry Potter is a distant cousin, through a Stinchcombe ancestor
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinch...opular_culture


    Polish surnames in ending in -ski are often toponyms
    Grabczynski is in my family tree.
    There are several villages named Grabkowo in Poland. I suspect this one might be relevant, because I have quite a few DNA matches with a history in that immediate region as well as emigration records from that general region.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grabkowo
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

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    Unfortunately I still have to do research on quite a few names to try to find origins. I'm not sure if it would count, but my ancestor who left France for Canada used two dit names during his life in addition to the older family one. One of these was location based, I've seen it written three ways so far: de La Coudre/Delacoudre/Lacoudray. Looks like there are a few locations in France with this name, and possibly at least one in Switzerland. His variation would be from France. This surname and variations do seem to be around still, and some families kept dit names instead of older family names when they fell out of favor. In my own line at least this didn't happen, but would have to do more digging to see if any of these variations are from a different branch that decided to settle with it or are totally unrelated. Could be a mix, or none related at all. Something interesting to spend time on.
    Last edited by linthos; 04-11-2021 at 06:41 PM.
    Paper Trail - Primarily French Canadian and Scottish (through Canada), after that there is English, Portuguese, German, and a small amount of Native American.

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    I have early New England colonial ancestors with the surname “Waterbury” who apparently first emigrated to England from Germany. Their surnames were previously “von Wasserburg.”
    Wasserburg castle is on Lake Constance. The castle was sold by the counts of Montfort to the Fuggers in 1592, but I don’t what connection (if any) my family has to the castle dwellers.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasserburg_am_Bodensee
    R1b>M269>L23>L51>L11>P312>DF19>DF88>FGC11833 >S4281>S4268>Z17112>BY44243

    Ancestors: Francis Cooke (M223/I2a2a) b1583; Hester Mahieu (Cooke) (J1c2 mtDNA) b.1584; Richard Warren (E-M35) b1578; Elizabeth Walker (Warren) (H1j mtDNA) b1583;
    John Mead (I2a1/P37.2) b1634; Rev. Joseph Hull (I1, L1301+ L1302-) b1595; Benjamin Harrington (M223/I2a2a-Y5729) b1618; Joshua Griffith (L21>DF13) b1593;
    John Wing (U106) b1584; Thomas Gunn (DF19) b1605; Hermann Wilhelm (DF19) b1635

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  7. #4
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    From my dad's side I have too many to count. Here are a few:

    Barcroft, Belden, Bickerstaff, Billings, Blackburn, Cowell, Cranmer, etc. (from towns in England)

    Delannoy (town in Northern France)

    Bergen (New Netherlands settler from that town in Norway)

    Harlev (town in Denmark)


    On my mom's side, just two that I'm aware of:

    Lipnick - from one of a few places currently or formerly named Lipnik, or Lipniki, in Belarus and Poland

    Romano - a Sephardic name, obviously means "Roman" (of the city, Rome), but actually existed in Iberia before 1492, so it's not clear whether the originator of that name in my family actually lived in Rome at any point

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    Quote Originally Posted by passenger View Post
    On my mom's side, just two that I'm aware of:

    Lipnick - from one of a few places currently or formerly named Lipnik, or Lipniki, in Belarus and Poland

    Romano - a Sephardic name, obviously means "Roman" (of the city, Rome), but actually existed in Iberia before 1492, so it's not clear whether the originator of that name in my family actually lived in Rome at any point
    From my German Ashkenazi branch, I have Dessauers, but no idea when/if they resided in Dessau. My info on them begins with them living more to the south in Bavaria/Franconia.
    R1b>M269>L23>L51>L11>P312>DF19>DF88>FGC11833 >S4281>S4268>Z17112>BY44243

    Ancestors: Francis Cooke (M223/I2a2a) b1583; Hester Mahieu (Cooke) (J1c2 mtDNA) b.1584; Richard Warren (E-M35) b1578; Elizabeth Walker (Warren) (H1j mtDNA) b1583;
    John Mead (I2a1/P37.2) b1634; Rev. Joseph Hull (I1, L1301+ L1302-) b1595; Benjamin Harrington (M223/I2a2a-Y5729) b1618; Joshua Griffith (L21>DF13) b1593;
    John Wing (U106) b1584; Thomas Gunn (DF19) b1605; Hermann Wilhelm (DF19) b1635

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  11. #6
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    TORO by maternal route non-mitochondrial

    Toro is a Spanish town and municipality in the province of Zamora, in the autonomous community of Castilla y León.

    https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toro_(Espa%C3%B1a)

    According to the scholars consulted, the Toro surname comes from the area of Castilla. Specifically, Fernando González-Doria points out this origin and adds that throughout its history, the surname was spread to other lands of the Iberian Peninsula and also to several countries of Latin America. Etymologically the surname is described in the work of Josep Mª Albaigès "El gran libro de los Apellidos", where it is said that the town of Toro, which some have identified with the ancient Arbucella, in the itinerary of Antoninus (the Arbucala of Polybius and Livy, city of the Vacceans taken by Hannibal), is located in the province of Zamora, on the banks of the Duero River. Although some have related its name to a tower, the most common opinion is that it comes from a bull (lat. taurus) of great proportions, whose mutilated trunk is still found in the town and which is a figure typical of Iberian iconography. However, it seems that the toponym comes from the ancient name Campi Gotthorum, which would generate in Campotoro to end in Toro.
    The main arms of the surname, according to Fernando González-Doria, are: in a silver field, three azure bands, and on each one of them, two walking brown bulls.

    Vacceans

    The Vaccean civilization extended over the center of the Northern Plateau on both banks of the Duero River. They occupied the entire province of Valladolid and part of the provinces of León, Palencia, Burgos, Segovia, Ávila, Salamanca and Zamora.

    Origins and ethnicity

    The Vacceans are considered within the group of the peninsular Celts and their origin is to be found in the Central European peoples who developed the Hallstatt culture. They practiced a collectivist type of agriculture and transhumant cattle raising. At that time the region was already defined by the chronicles as a "free and discovered" region and "an open country of wheat fields, an uncultivated land".

    A few years ago they were spoken of as a people of Celtic origin, belonging to the Belovacs group, who would have departed from northern Europe around 600 B.C. together with other peoples of the Celtic group of the Belgians, as a result of the pressures exerted by the Germanic peoples, reaching the lands of the peninsular interior in the first half of the 6th century B.C., together with other peoples such as the Arevacs (a name that means nothing other than the Eastern Vacceans).


    Cultural elements

    In the study of the sites, elements of the Vaccean culture are found on the remains of previous cultures (as in the case of Soto de Medinilla, in Valladolid), where there is evidence of settlement from the Neolithic to the 2nd Iron Age (i.e., the Vaccean period), which allows us to study in some detail the evolution of human groups in this area of the plateau, giving way to the evolutionary theory of this civilization.

    The evaluation of the cultural aspects related to the south of Spain, scarcely taken into account in the first investigations, as well as the data provided by the studies carried out on the interior tin route, have made it possible since 1970 to advance notably in the knowledge of the formation of the Vaccean civilization. At present, the existence of an overland route for the tin trade at the height of the Tartessian civilization seems to be proven. This road would coincide with the one that would later be used by Ancient Rome and known as the Vía de la Plata. The transit of this road for centuries put in contact the peoples of the interior with the most evolved of southern Spain.

    Their dwellings were generally built with adobe bricks plastered with mud and had a rectangular floor plan, where the main room was located, with benches attached to the walls.

    https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacceos
    Last edited by hantrolugharsts; 04-12-2021 at 12:31 AM.

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    I have a few, though not many:

    Gordon, Meachen, Kerr and my family.
    Last edited by Nqp15hhu; 04-12-2021 at 02:12 PM.

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    I1-L1301 10th great grandfather, the Rev. Joseph Hull (Oxford Univ (St. Mary Hall) class of 1614) - early colonist; born 1594 in the seditionist hotbed of Crewkerne in Somerset, but his surname of Hull could be a reference to the city or the river (or maybe just a random hill?):

    The surname Hull was first found in the Yorkshire at Kingston upon Hull, more commonly known as Hull, a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. The place is derived from the River Hull and dates back to at least 1228 and is home to the largest parish church in England dating back to 1285.
    The derivation is from the Old English pre 7th Century "hyll" meaning hill, it may also be a topographical name for a "dweller on or by a hill".
    Local. From the city of Hull, in Yorkshire, England, which comes from the Teutonic or Saxon Hiden or Heulen, to howl, from the noise the river [rest is behind paywall]
    Better version:
    The city, recently announced as Britain’s Capital of Culture for 2017, is properly called Kingston-upon-Hull; but such is the ubiquity of the shortened name Hull that the river itself has got somewhat lost. Perhaps this is not so surprising; after all, the city faces out into the vast grey estuary of a much larger river, the Humber, leaving its eponymous stream to snake through the industrial landscape of wrecking yards and ruined docks undisturbed and unrecognised.

    Just as in the early poem ‘Effra’ the derivation of the name is important. Whereas the lost river of south London may have taken its name from the Celtic word for ‘torrent’ or even, given the epigraph to the poem (‘Sous les pavés, la plage! Paris, 1968), the French ‘effroi’, the name for Hull has no definitive etymology:

    Some claim it as Celtic for ‘deep river’ or Saxon for ‘muddy river’, but the most alluring explanation was offered by Nathan Bailey in his 1721 An Universal Etymological English Dictionary:

    HULL…of hulen, Lower Saxon heulen, Teutonic, to howl, from the Noise the River makes, when it meets the Sea.
    Last edited by Dewsloth; 04-12-2021 at 03:38 PM.
    R1b>M269>L23>L51>L11>P312>DF19>DF88>FGC11833 >S4281>S4268>Z17112>BY44243

    Ancestors: Francis Cooke (M223/I2a2a) b1583; Hester Mahieu (Cooke) (J1c2 mtDNA) b.1584; Richard Warren (E-M35) b1578; Elizabeth Walker (Warren) (H1j mtDNA) b1583;
    John Mead (I2a1/P37.2) b1634; Rev. Joseph Hull (I1, L1301+ L1302-) b1595; Benjamin Harrington (M223/I2a2a-Y5729) b1618; Joshua Griffith (L21>DF13) b1593;
    John Wing (U106) b1584; Thomas Gunn (DF19) b1605; Hermann Wilhelm (DF19) b1635

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    My core ancestral area (central/south Dutch) is the main area of "van" (from) surnames, so I have too many to list. Among the jewish side, the most clear one is Speyer.

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