Page 220 of 243 FirstFirst ... 120170210218219220221222230 ... LastLast
Results 2,191 to 2,200 of 2421

Thread: New DNA Papers - General Discussion Thread

  1. #2191
    Registered Users
    Posts
    741
    Sex
    Location
    Central Florida
    Ethnicity
    Aegean Greek
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    J-L26
    mtDNA (M)
    J1b1a

    Greece United States of America
    Quote Originally Posted by Kristiina View Post
    Attachment 29869 Attachment 29870 Attachment 29871

    However, the differences between population speaking Uralic languages are not bigger than differences between populations speaking IE languages. If we compare Armenians, Punjabis and English, we see that they are all very different. Armenians are very high in Basal and Basal is more divergent than ENA. Punjabis are for the most part of Indian ancestry.

    Source: Characterizing the genetic history of admixture across inner Eurasia, supplementary material

    (I am sorry that the resolution is so poor in the paper)
    Yeah, but West Eurasianness is defined by Basal Eurasian-Western Crown hybridity, no? East Baltics are just at the very Crown Eurasian end of the admixture. They still have significant basal ancestry through ANF and CHG, just not as much as Brits, who don't have a much as Greeks, who don't have a much as Bedouins. They all have it though, unlike Nganasans (other than maybe very trace amounts). I'm pretty sure fst between Estonians and Armenians is lower than between Estonians and Nganasan.
    Last edited by Michalis Moriopoulos; 04-18-2019 at 03:11 PM.
    Ελευθερία ή θάνατος.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Michalis Moriopoulos For This Useful Post:

     hartaisarlag (04-23-2019),  palamede (04-19-2019)

  3. #2192
    Global Moderator
    Posts
    684
    Sex
    Location
    EU
    Ethnicity
    Finnish
    Y-DNA (P)
    Father N1c
    mtDNA (M)
    I5a

    My own prediction is that Proto-Uralics will be a mixture of EHG and Corded Ware as these components are defined in Tambets et al, 2018, fig. 6.: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/art...4/figure/Fig6/

    Proto-Eastern-Uralics carry Siberian or rather the Ket-Uralic component.

  4. #2193
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    7,515

    Quote Originally Posted by Michalis Moriopoulos View Post
    Yeah, but West Eurasianness is defined by Basal Eurasian-Western Crown hybridity, no? ...
    West Eurasianness existed before these terms.
    Genetically it was defined as an allele set typically found in West Eurasians populations.

    I think Basal was first introduced by Lazaridis in 2013 where West Eurasians were found to have three very divergent set of alleles, one Basal which had diverged early from East Eurasians and the other two (ANE and WHG) that shared drift with East Eurasians to the exclusion of Basal.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to parasar For This Useful Post:

     palamede (04-19-2019)

  6. #2194
    Registered Users
    Posts
    236
    Sex

    Lebanon
    Has there been any release about the Harappan skeletons they found?
    *Please take my pre-2020 posts very lightly*

  7. #2195
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    7,515

    Quote Originally Posted by rozenfeld View Post
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-43384-3

    Article | Open | Published: 06 May 2019

    The peopling of Lakshadweep Archipelago

    Mohammed S. Mustak, Niraj Rai, Mohan Rao Naveen, Satya Prakash, S. Justin Carlus, Nagarjuna Pasupuleti, Anshika Srivastava, Prajjval Pratap Singh, Idrees Babu, Pavan Kumar Dubey, Gyaneshwer Chaubey & Kumarasamy Thangaraj

    Scientific Reportsvolume 9, Article number: 6968 (2019) | Download Citation

    Abstract

    The archipelago of Lakshadweep is considered as a stopover to the maritime route since ancient time. It is not very clear when the human first occupied these islands, however in the long history of the islands, the local legends suggest that Lakshadweep has been ruled by different kingdoms. To have a better understanding of peopling of Lakshadweep, we have analysed 557 individuals from eight major islands for mitochondrial DNA and 166 individuals for Y chromosome markers. We found a strong founder effect for both paternal and maternal lineages. Moreover, we report a close genetic link of Lakshadweep islanders with the Maldives, Sri Lanka and India. Most of the Lakshadweep islands share the haplogroups specific to South Asia and West Eurasia, except Minicoy Island that also shares haplogroups of East Eurasia. The paternal and maternal ancestries of the majority of island populations suggest their arrival from distinct sources. We found that the maternal ancestry was closer to South Indian populations, whereas the paternal ancestry was overwhelmed with the haplogroups, more common in the Maldives and North of India. In conclusion, our first genetic data suggest that the majority of human ancestry in Lakshadweep is largely derived from South Asia with minor influences from East and West Eurasia.
    Y
    n=166
    H1a-M82 9
    J-M304 1
    J2a-M172 19
    R1a-M17 63
    R2a-M124 74

    Y-R 82.53%

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to parasar For This Useful Post:

     aaronbee2010 (05-06-2019),  palamede (05-06-2019)

  9. #2196
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    1,192
    Sex
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Ethnicity
    Indian - Punjabi Jatt
    Nationality
    British
    Y-DNA (P)
    R2-SK2142 > A26339
    mtDNA (M)
    U7a3a
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-Z2109 > Y84821
    mtDNA (P)
    M5a1a

    England United Kingdom India India Punjab
    Quote Originally Posted by parasar View Post
    Y
    n=166
    H1a-M82 9
    J-M304 1
    J2a-M172 19
    R1a-M17 63
    R2a-M124 74

    Y-R 82.53%
    YFull: YF72440 (FTDNA - IN41220)

    Ancestral Haplos (Punjabi Jatt):
    * Father: R2-SK2142 > A26339 - M5a1a
    * Maternal Uncle: R1b-Z2109 > Y84821 - U7a3a
    * MGMs F (?): L-M22 > M357 - ?
    * PGMs F (?): Q-F1096 > F4747 - ?
    * MGMs MGF (?): R1a-Z93 > Y7 - ?

    Friends Haplos:
    * North Moroccan Berber: E-M35 > M81 - R0
    * Han Chinese: O-M117 > F1531 - M7e
    * Gujarati Lohana (?): T-Y11151 > Y13290 - R30b1

    Hidden Content

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to aaronbee2010 For This Useful Post:

     palamede (05-06-2019),  parasar (05-06-2019)

  11. #2197
    Registered Users
    Posts
    341
    Sex
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Ethnicity
    Polish/British Isles
    Nationality
    U.S.
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-A9185
    mtDNA (M)
    H1

    Poland England Ireland Munster

    A Genetic Difference between Farmers and Hunter-Gatherers

    Genetic diversity of CHC22 clathrin impacts its function in glucose metabolism
    CHC22 clathrin plays a key role in intracellular membrane traffic of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4 in humans. We performed population genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the CHC22-encoding CLTCL1 gene, revealing independent gene loss in at least two vertebrate lineages, after arising from gene duplication. All vertebrates retained the paralogous CLTC gene encoding CHC17 clathrin, which mediates endocytosis. For vertebrates retaining CLTCL1, strong evidence for purifying selection supports CHC22 functionality. All human populations maintained two high frequency CLTCL1 allelic variants, encoding either methionine or valine at position 1316. Functional studies indicated that CHC22-V1316, which is more frequent in farming populations than in hunter-gatherers, has different cellular dynamics than M1316-CHC22 and is less effective at controlling GLUT4 membrane traffic, attenuating its insulin-regulated response. These analyses suggest that ancestral human dietary change influenced selection of allotypes that affect CHC22's role in metabolism and have potential to differentially influence the human insulin response.
    ...
    The derived allele arose in ancient humans and is more frequent in farming populations when compared to hunter-gatherers.
    ...
    We found that the V1316 amino acid is present in Pleistocene hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers but not in other Neanderthals or Holocene hunter-gatherers in this limited data set
    ...
    Statistical analysis comparing early farmer and hunter-gatherer populations shows an apparent increase of the V1316 variant, suggesting a correlation with regular consumption of digestible carbohydrate. Notably, the SNP distinguishing these alleles is human-specific and likely arose 550-50 KYA (i.e. post-Neanderthal, pre-Neolithic).
    ...
    One plausible explanation of the high genetic diversity and frequency of the two major alleles of CLTCL1 that occur in all modern human populations is balancing selection. Such a distribution of allele frequency was confirmed using a different data set of more than 50 sampled human populations (Figure 4-figure supplement 2). In several populations, we also observed an apparent excess of heterozygosity at SNP rs1061325, compatible with heterozygote advantage (overdominance) for the two encoded allotypes differing at residue 1316. Specifically, all European populations show a ratio of observed versus expected (assuming Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium) heterozygosity greater than 1, with the highest value of 1.24 (chi-squared test nominal p-value 0.047) for Iberic Spanish (IBS) . Selective pressures that might be acting on CLTCL1, irrespective of population distribution, could be changes in human diet, a number of which have been inferred over the last 2.6 million years (Hardy et al., 2015). Perhaps the best known of these dietary transitions are the introduction of cooking ~450 KYA, development of farming ~12,500 YA, and more recently industrialized food processing, which gradually and then dramatically increased carbohydrate availability and consumption by humans.

    rs1061325 was the main SNP discussed in the paper. It was present in both my 23andMe and Ancestry DNA tests. I was mixed (CT) for rs1061325. If I interpreted the paper correctly C should be the allele associated with farmers and T is the allele associated with hunter-gatherers. I tried to figure that out by looking at dbSNP https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/snp/rs1061325. It would would be great if anyone would be kind enough to confirm that. Anyone else willing to share their test results for rs1061325?
    Last edited by pmokeefe; 05-16-2019 at 07:49 AM.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  12. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     cpan0256 (05-18-2019),  Drewcastle (05-18-2019),  Megalophias (05-16-2019),  Nebuchadnezzar II (05-16-2019),  palamede (05-17-2019)

  13. #2198
    Registered Users
    Posts
    61
    Sex

    23andMe v3 result for an East Asian: rs1061325 CC
    Last edited by cpan0256; 05-18-2019 at 03:07 PM. Reason: add the SNP number to my reply

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to cpan0256 For This Useful Post:

     pmokeefe (05-18-2019)

  15. #2199
    Registered Users
    Posts
    56
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    Valencian-Andalusian
    Nationality
    ES
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b Z195

    Quote Originally Posted by pmokeefe View Post
    Genetic diversity of CHC22 clathrin impacts its function in glucose metabolism
    CHC22 clathrin plays a key role in intracellular membrane traffic of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4 in humans. We performed population genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the CHC22-encoding CLTCL1 gene, revealing independent gene loss in at least two vertebrate lineages, after arising from gene duplication. All vertebrates retained the paralogous CLTC gene encoding CHC17 clathrin, which mediates endocytosis. For vertebrates retaining CLTCL1, strong evidence for purifying selection supports CHC22 functionality. All human populations maintained two high frequency CLTCL1 allelic variants, encoding either methionine or valine at position 1316. Functional studies indicated that CHC22-V1316, which is more frequent in farming populations than in hunter-gatherers, has different cellular dynamics than M1316-CHC22 and is less effective at controlling GLUT4 membrane traffic, attenuating its insulin-regulated response. These analyses suggest that ancestral human dietary change influenced selection of allotypes that affect CHC22's role in metabolism and have potential to differentially influence the human insulin response.
    ...
    The derived allele arose in ancient humans and is more frequent in farming populations when compared to hunter-gatherers.
    ...
    We found that the V1316 amino acid is present in Pleistocene hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers but not in other Neanderthals or Holocene hunter-gatherers in this limited data set
    ...
    Statistical analysis comparing early farmer and hunter-gatherer populations shows an apparent increase of the V1316 variant, suggesting a correlation with regular consumption of digestible carbohydrate. Notably, the SNP distinguishing these alleles is human-specific and likely arose 550-50 KYA (i.e. post-Neanderthal, pre-Neolithic).
    ...
    One plausible explanation of the high genetic diversity and frequency of the two major alleles of CLTCL1 that occur in all modern human populations is balancing selection. Such a distribution of allele frequency was confirmed using a different data set of more than 50 sampled human populations (Figure 4-figure supplement 2). In several populations, we also observed an apparent excess of heterozygosity at SNP rs1061325, compatible with heterozygote advantage (overdominance) for the two encoded allotypes differing at residue 1316. Specifically, all European populations show a ratio of observed versus expected (assuming Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium) heterozygosity greater than 1, with the highest value of 1.24 (chi-squared test nominal p-value 0.047) for Iberic Spanish (IBS) . Selective pressures that might be acting on CLTCL1, irrespective of population distribution, could be changes in human diet, a number of which have been inferred over the last 2.6 million years (Hardy et al., 2015). Perhaps the best known of these dietary transitions are the introduction of cooking ~450 KYA, development of farming ~12,500 YA, and more recently industrialized food processing, which gradually and then dramatically increased carbohydrate availability and consumption by humans.

    rs1061325 was the main SNP discussed in the paper. It was present in both my 23andMe and Ancestry DNA tests. I was mixed (CT) for rs1061325. If I interpreted the paper correctly C should be the allele associated with farmers and T is the allele associated with hunter-gatherers. I tried to figure that out by looking at dbSNP https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/snp/rs1061325. It would would be great if anyone would be kind enough to confirm that. Anyone else willing to share their test results for rs1061325?
    Interestingly I have CC and my grandmother TT, and in most calculators my gm have a slightly greater proportion of Neolithic farmer

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to Drewcastle For This Useful Post:

     pmokeefe (05-18-2019)

  17. #2200
    Junior Member
    Posts
    2
    Sex
    Location
    Canada

    This post is good and informative.

Page 220 of 243 FirstFirst ... 120170210218219220221222230 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. U1 General Thread
    By Johane Derite in forum U
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 05-29-2020, 03:29 PM
  2. R1b Specific Thread for 10 May 2017 Papers
    By MitchellSince1893 in forum R1b General
    Replies: 129
    Last Post: 06-27-2017, 07:25 PM
  3. Bell Beaker Papers: Raw Data Thread
    By Webb in forum Ancient (aDNA)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-25-2017, 01:33 PM
  4. DISCUSSION THREAD: Archaeology, Prehistory Papers
    By Gravetto-Danubian in forum Archaeology (Prehistory)
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 05-05-2017, 01:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •