Page 79 of 80 FirstFirst ... 296977787980 LastLast
Results 781 to 790 of 791

Thread: Ancestry Update + Ethnicity Inheritance (Apr 2022)

  1. #781
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,822
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1a-BY27340
    mtDNA (M)
    H1q2a

    Spain Andalucia Basque
    Quote Originally Posted by Ibericus View Post
    Now Catalonia is with France and they made me 20% French. I'm from Valencia and Murcia, I guess that's why.
    CH]
    Don´t you live in Spain, isn´t it?

    I´d like to purchase an Ancestry test but as far as I know, they don´t ship tests to Spain.

  2. #782
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,258
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    Mixed
    aDNA Match (1st)
    Muslim Sharqi Andalusi Iberia_Southeast_c.10-16CE:I12514 0.03148322

    Quote Originally Posted by mokordo View Post
    Don´t you live in Spain, isn´t it?

    I´d like to purchase an Ancestry test but as far as I know, they don´t ship tests to Spain.
    It's the same in France but it's possible
    Illustrative 2Way Fit: 2.160 Continental Celt (Etruria)77.6%+22.4%Guanche
    Fit: 1.948 Algerian Berber (Mozabite)19.7%+French Occitan (Occitanie)80.3%
    3Way Fit: 1.824 Continental Celt (Belgae)70.9%+North Anatolian (Kingdom of Pontus)8.3%+Guanche 20.8%
    Fit: 1.792 Alsatian (Alsace)51.6%+Basque (France)26.9%+Moroccan21.5%

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Aben Aboo For This Useful Post:

     Fitis (08-29-2022),  Rufus191 (09-06-2022)

  4. #783
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,765
    Sex
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Ethnicity
    Ger.-Brit.-Catalan-more
    Nationality
    (U.S.) American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-YP619*
    mtDNA (M)
    H1bg

    United Kingdom Germany Bayern Catalonia France Ireland Switzerland
    Quote Originally Posted by Ibericus View Post
    Now Catalonia is with France and they made me 20% French. I'm from Valencia and Murcia, I guess that's why.
    Attachment 50989
    Attachment 50990
    That's actually worked to my advantage, in a way. My maternal grandmother was half Menorcan, which ought to make me an eighth. That isn't a lot, but it's enough that it ought to show up. Typically, it hasn't -- at Ancestry. Though it does show up at other companies, like 23andMe, MyHeritage, FTDNA, and LivingDNA.

    In the previous update, I only got a very tiny bit of Spain -- actually <1% (range 0-6%). I also got a tiny bit -- 1% -- of Portugal (range 0-4%).

    But with this latest update moving Menorca from Ancestry's Spain region to its France region, the tiny percentages of Spain and Portugal both changed to France. Not only that, they also increased. It's still on the low side for me, I believe, but the range has also increased to 0-25%.
    Besides British-German-Catalan, ancestry includes smaller amounts of French, Irish, Swiss, Choctaw & another NA tribe, possibly Catawba. Avatar picture is: my father, his father, & his father's father; baby is my eldest brother.

    GB

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to geebee For This Useful Post:

     Ibericus (08-30-2022)

  6. #784
    Registered Users
    Posts
    141
    Location
    Bulgaria
    Ethnicity
    Bulgarian, Eastern Slavic
    Nationality
    Bulgarian
    mtDNA (M)
    U

    Bulgaria
    B739ED73-70C8-4FCA-948B-B63BC2782587.jpegB739ED73-70C8-4FCA-948B-B63BC2782587.jpeg
    I’ve also got this one as a nortification today. Reading it ; it should be about the recent update ; maybe I just got the banner a little bit later ; but who knows?

  7. #785
    Registered Users
    Posts
    231
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    I1
    mtDNA (M)
    L3e4

    Cape Verde Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Angoliga View Post
    Happy to see this new "Nilotic Peoples" cluster but it still needs more work; I'm curious what specific (S.Sudanese?) source samples were used.

    "Khoisan, Aka & Mbuti Peoples" seems to still be eating a huge chunk of great-lake Ancestral East-African ancestry.

    Hopefully the disintegration of "Eastern Bantu Peoples" gives more accurate results for other Central-East-Africans.
    I have seen several results now from Uganda and surrounding countries (see this page). And I am guessing that Ancestry has been using samples from more than just 1 ethnic group. I saw one Nuer person with a perfect "Nilotic" score. So clearly some South Sudanese samples. But what strikes me as kind of odd is the high "Nilotic" scores of Tutsi testers. As always Ancestry is not being transparent about their samples but what they mention in the regional description could be an indication: "Luo, Maasai, Turkana, Dinka, Nuer, and Kipsigis."

    Have you checked out your Ethnicity Inheritance results yet? From what I have seen it works pretty good for people whose parents are of different backgrounds. For me it was spot on! It might be helpful to see which side your "Khoisan, Aka & Mbuti Peoples" is coming from and also which parent is mosty "Nilotic".

    I am glad that Ancestry is finally filling this gap, although I agree it still needs work. Hopefully they will add samples to cover the central Sahel in their next update. I have to say overall speaking Ancestry's African breakdown is arguably in the best shape it has ever been, also for people of West/Central African descent. Mostly due to Ancestry finally fixing the “Ivory Coast & Ghana” defect (after FOUR years!). The new "Nigeria East-Central" region looks cute but will usually be absent for most people in the Americas and otherwise only show up with trace amounts of 1 or 2% (see this chart). So basically a wasted opportunity to really provide some meaningful delineation for Nigerian DNA.
    Last edited by Don Felipe; 09-25-2022 at 09:57 PM.
    Hidden Content
    Exploring the Ethnic Origins of the Afro-Diaspora

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Don Felipe For This Useful Post:

     Riverman (09-26-2022)

  9. #786
    Administrator
    Posts
    2,522
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    DF27
    mtDNA (M)
    V33

    New Zealand Croatia Star of David Ireland England Poland
    Uncle's results:

    Ancestry on paper: English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, Croatian, Ashkenazi, Polish and Māori.

  10. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to BalkanKiwi For This Useful Post:

     Bul (11-03-2022),  Gentica277282 (11-03-2022),  passenger (11-03-2022)

  11. #787
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,643
    Ethnicity
    Arab
    Y-DNA (P)
    J2a-J-L210-J-y15222
    mtDNA (M)
    L1b2a

    Quote Originally Posted by BalkanKiwi View Post
    Uncle's results:

    Is this accurate for him? I always think for Mediterranean populations and North Africans they're really good

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Gentica277282 For This Useful Post:

     BalkanKiwi (11-03-2022)

  13. #788
    Administrator
    Posts
    2,522
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    DF27
    mtDNA (M)
    V33

    New Zealand Croatia Star of David Ireland England Poland
    Quote Originally Posted by Gentica277282 View Post
    Is this accurate for him? I always think for Mediterranean populations and North Africans they're really good
    Surprisingly yes. On paper he's almost 50% Balkan. Lincolnshire is where our direct paternal line is from, and his Norway segments match with mine and where I've triangulated Norwegian clusters.
    Ancestry on paper: English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, Croatian, Ashkenazi, Polish and Māori.

  14. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to BalkanKiwi For This Useful Post:

     Bul (11-03-2022),  Gentica277282 (11-03-2022)

  15. #789
    Registered Users
    Posts
    3,223
    Ethnicity
    Northern Ireland
    Nationality
    Northern Irish
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-L193(BY2634)
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-M222

    Northern Ireland Ireland Scotland
    The ordering of my Genetic Communities has changed, along with the probabilities.

    The results are now very accurate and much more representative of my ancestry!

    1. (5) Ulster > Very likely, this was possible.
    2. (1) Donegal > Likely, this was likely.
    3. (2) Northern Ireland & Southwest Scotland > likely, was likely.
    4. (3) New Jersey & Eastern Pennsylvania Settlers > Possible, this was possible.
    5. (4) Scottish Lowlands > possible, this was possible.

    Old Order:






    Updated Order:



    Last edited by Nqp15hhu; 11-05-2022 at 10:06 PM.

  16. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Nqp15hhu For This Useful Post:

     Fitis (11-10-2022),  Marmaduke (11-06-2022),  Riverman (11-06-2022),  Telfermagne (11-05-2022),  timberwolf (11-05-2022),  TOMESQ (11-07-2022)

  17. #790
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,515
    Sex
    Location
    Ireland
    Ethnicity
    Irish
    Y-DNA (P)
    L21>BY3437>Y160102
    mtDNA (M)
    H6a1b2h
    mtDNA (P)
    H27e

    Ireland Ireland Connacht Ireland County Roscommon Ireland County Galway Ireland County Mayo
    My family's genetic communities have also been updated with Central Ireland as a new community. This makes sense since most of my family were from Roscommon. The order hasn't changed.

    Me
    Connacht, Ireland
    North Connacht
    West Roscommon & East Mayo
    West Roscommon, East Mayo & North Galway
    South Sligo & North Roscommon
    Central Ireland New

    Mum
    Your communities with a connection to this ethnicity regionYour connection to this ethnicity region may come through ancestors from these communities.
    Connacht, Ireland
    North Connacht
    West Roscommon & East Mayo
    South Sligo & North Roscommon
    West Roscommon, East Mayo & North Galway
    Central Ireland New

    Paternal Aunt
    Connacht, Ireland
    North Connacht
    West Roscommon & East Mayo
    West Roscommon, East Mayo & North Galway
    South Sligo & North Roscommon
    Central Ireland New
    New Jersey & Eastern Pennsylvania Settlers
    Mid-Atlantic Settlers

    Paternal Great Aunt
    Connacht, Ireland
    North Connacht
    West Roscommon & East Mayo
    South Sligo & North Roscommon
    Central Ireland New
    New Jersey & Eastern Pennyslvania Settlers
    Mid-Atlantic Settlers
    Philadelphia, South & Central Jersey Settlers

    This is the description for Central Ireland:
    Community History
    Among the rolling hills and green pastures of the Irish lowlands, most inhabitants of central Ireland carved out a living on small plots of land. They lived in rural areas, spoke Irish, and practised Catholicism. Ireland’s history is plagued by years of famine and centuries of clashes over religion, which led millions to seek a new life elsewhere. The most common destination was the United States, where Irish Americans’ political and cultural contributions created a distinct Irish-American identity and made them a vital part of American life.

    1775–1800
    Catholicism in Ireland

    The vast majority of the native Irish population were Roman Catholic and lived along the coasts and other waterways, including the River Shannon, Lough Allen, and Lough Neagh. Most lived in rural areas and made a modest living raising sheep and dairy cattle and growing potatoes. Growing and spinning flax for linen was also a common household industry. For centuries, British colonists had confiscated land, leaving people in central Ireland to work as tenant farmers. However, laws that oppressed Irish Catholics (known as the Penal Laws) were being repealed, as rights such as voting, owning property, and practising Catholicism were gradually reinstated.

    1800–1825
    Agriculture & Industry

    England violently suppressed the Irish Rebellion of 1798, and the 1800 Act of Union placed Ireland completely under British rule. While some people found work manufacturing rope, iron, and linen, most still relied on agriculture. Crops such as oats, barley, and corn were often exported to England, and potatoes were one of the only crops cultivated for Irish use. This led to widespread famine in 1816–1817 after Ireland’s first major potato crop failure. Poor as they were, many still scraped together enough money to send their children to ‘hedge schools’ held in cottages, barns, or outdoors and taught by traveling Catholic schoolmasters.

    1825–1850
    The Great Famine

    For the poor, life went from difficult to impossible. In Leitrim, weavers lost jobs to mechanisation in the linen industry. Potatoes and dairy often made up the diet of the poor, which made potato crop failures in the 1840s devastating, especially as Irish-grown wheat, oats, and barley were exported to England. Some lived on boiled cabbage leaves every few days. Carrick-on-Shannon’s workhouse housed 800, but conditions were so poor many died of disease. Roscommon, Leitrim, and Cavan were all hard hit in the famine years, with estimated mortality rates of around 50,000 per year.

    1850–1875
    Fleeing Famine

    In the years following the Great Famine, more than one million people left Ireland. Most headed to the United States. Both Cavan and Roscommon saw large numbers go to New York. Irish immigrants joined established Irish-American neighbourhoods on the Eastern Seaboard and found work on railroads, on the docks, and as domestic servants in the cities where many stayed because they had no money to go further. Their knowledge of English allowed them to assimilate more easily than their Polish or Italian counterparts, for example, but swelling Irish neighbourhoods still aroused suspicion in a country that was still largely anti-Catholic.

    1875–1900
    Migrating Far & Wide

    Agitation for the famous 'Three Fs'—fair rents, free sale, and fixity of tenure—culminated in the Land Wars that allowed tenants to buy land and eased rents. However, poverty, crop failures, and land troubles in Ireland continued to prompt emigration. Most people who left during this time followed their countrymen’s footsteps to the United States, where they made their homes in the industrialised cities of Chicago, Boston, and New York, where they worked in steel mills and in stockyards. Others travelled as far as New South Wales, Australia, following the gold rush in towns such as Orange, Wellington, and Bathurst.

    1900–1925
    Fighting for Freedom

    The early 20th century in Ireland was marked by a growing movement for freedom from British rule, in favour of what the Irish called ‘Home Rule’, and the Irish Free State was created in 1921. This movement was supported by those living in Ireland as well as Irish Americans in the United States, who rallied support within their growing communities to demonstrate solidarity for a free Ireland. However, anti-immigration groups in America saw the demonstrations as disloyalty to their adopted country. In Ireland counties along the border region saw skirmishes between Nationalist and Unionist forces and sometimes lived under intimidation by paramilitary forces.

    1925–1950
    Forging New Trails

    Achieving Irish Home Rule was, in many ways, only the beginning of a lasting struggle for citizens of the Irish Free State. Maintaining political and administrative structures in the first years after the Irish Civil War proved difficult, partly due to the worldwide recession triggered by the Wall Street crash of 1929. Immigrants continued to stream towards the United States, adapting aspects of their life and traditions to their new country. Descendants of 19th-century immigrants had moved into the American middle class, becoming fixtures in business, politics, civil service, and the Catholic Church in cities like Boston and New York.
    Ancestry: Ireland (Paper trail ≅ 81.25% Roscommon, 12.5% Galway, 6.25% Mayo)
    Y-DNA (P) ancestor (Y): Kelly b. c1830 in Co. Roscommon (Uí Maine)
    mtDNA (P) ancestor: Fleming b. c1831 in Co. Roscommon
    mtDNA (M) ancestor: McDermott b. c1814 in Co. Roscommon
    mtDNA Great grandfather: Connella b. c1798 in Co. Roscommon (T2a1a8)
    Y-DNA 2x great grandfather: Higgins b. c1816 in Co. Roscommon (R-DF109)
    Y-DNA 3x great grandfather: Fleming b. c1829 in Co. Roscommon (R-Z23534)

  18. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to FionnSneachta For This Useful Post:

     Anglecynn (11-08-2022),  Fitis (11-10-2022),  Garimund (11-08-2022),  TOMESQ (11-10-2022)

Page 79 of 80 FirstFirst ... 296977787980 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Ancestry DNA Update of Ethnicity Estimate
    By rms2 in forum AncestryDNA
    Replies: 112
    Last Post: 06-22-2021, 02:33 PM
  2. Significant ancestry inheritance and DNA testing
    By Aiden in forum Autosomal (auDNA)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-14-2021, 08:22 AM
  3. Replies: 67
    Last Post: 07-12-2020, 03:39 AM
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-27-2019, 10:40 PM
  5. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-02-2018, 10:09 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •