Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 24 of 24

Thread: New research shows humans settled in North America 17,000 years earlier than previous

  1. #21
    Junior Member
    Posts
    5
    Sex
    Omitted

    Just read the fine print on the commercial sites. The ydna percentages for women reflect the ydna of male samples that are close to the user sample.
    I'm shaking my head over my cognitive hiccup...knowing full well that I have 2 x chromosomes, i should have immediately looked for an explanation of what the ydna breakdowns represented. That thought never made it across a critical synapse.

  2. #22
    Junior Member
    Posts
    5
    Sex
    Omitted

    I'm really not assuming anything. I'm just looking to understand the science. The paper on the e/w migrations in the x variant was from this study. https://imgur.com/WAUAv55. My mtdna is represented on the colored wheel. Full text: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/~tgschurr/...0ASHG%2003.pdf

    Looking at the art, there are forms in the northeast U.S that have stylistic components of other cultures, and I'm interested current dna research because of the relationship of genetics and culture.

    And the degree to which I share mutations with the Clovis sample paired with the degree to which I do not match the Kennewick sample is something I would like to understand.

  3. #23
    Junior Member
    Posts
    5
    Sex
    Omitted

    This was the research that I was waiting for. Would explain both questions. Looks like the tests were spot-on.

    From: https://www.harvardmagazine.com/2022...re-ancient-dna

    "....Reich and his colleagues had been assessing the relatedness of different groups of modern humans. When they compared Northern Europeans to Native Americans and Southern Europeans, each of whom have distinctive (but not necessarily functionally important) genetic changes at varying frequencies across their genomes, they observed a powerful statistical signal that Northern Europeans have “a massive contribution of genetic material from a population related to Native Americans.”

    “We of course didn’t think that Native Americans sailed across the Atlantic. That seemed implausible,” he says. Instead, he and his colleagues proposed the existence of a population that no longer exists, the “Ancient North Eurasians.” “They would have lived in Siberia, or other parts of northern Eurasia, sometime before 15,000 years ago, and contributed to the ancestors of Native Americans before they crossed the Bering Land bridge into North America.” Then, some time later, genes of the descendants of the Ancient North Eurasians who had not crossed into North America somehow suddenly appeared in populations throughout Eurasia. “The signal” Reich recalls, “was very strong.”

    “It was a weird observation,” he says, because the prevailing model from archaeology in 2012 “was that Europeans might very well be mixed between hunter gatherers who were the sole population in Europe before 8,500 years ago, and Anatolian farmers” who brought agriculture to Europe after that time. That theory rested on the reasonable—but as it turned out, incorrect—assumption that once farming was established in Europe, allowing highly efficient exploitation of local resources, it would have been difficult for any other group to make a major demographic impact. The discovery of genes related to Native Americans arriving in high proportion after the spread of farming was therefore very surprising. That’s why Reich and his close collaborator, research fellow in genetics Nick Patterson, had hypothesized the existence of this third source population, the Ancient North Eurasians..."

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by TheKearnsSite View Post
    This was the research that I was waiting for. Would explain both questions. Looks like the tests were spot-on.

    From: https://www.harvardmagazine.com/2022...re-ancient-dna

    "....Reich and his colleagues had been assessing the relatedness of different groups of modern humans. When they compared Northern Europeans to Native Americans and Southern Europeans, each of whom have distinctive (but not necessarily functionally important) genetic changes at varying frequencies across their genomes, they observed a powerful statistical signal that Northern Europeans have “a massive contribution of genetic material from a population related to Native Americans.”

    “We of course didn’t think that Native Americans sailed across the Atlantic. That seemed implausible,” he says. Instead, he and his colleagues proposed the existence of a population that no longer exists, the “Ancient North Eurasians.” “They would have lived in Siberia, or other parts of northern Eurasia, sometime before 15,000 years ago, and contributed to the ancestors of Native Americans before they crossed the Bering Land bridge into North America.” Then, some time later, genes of the descendants of the Ancient North Eurasians who had not crossed into North America somehow suddenly appeared in populations throughout Eurasia. “The signal” Reich recalls, “was very strong.”

    “It was a weird observation,” he says, because the prevailing model from archaeology in 2012 “was that Europeans might very well be mixed between hunter gatherers who were the sole population in Europe before 8,500 years ago, and Anatolian farmers” who brought agriculture to Europe after that time. That theory rested on the reasonable—but as it turned out, incorrect—assumption that once farming was established in Europe, allowing highly efficient exploitation of local resources, it would have been difficult for any other group to make a major demographic impact. The discovery of genes related to Native Americans arriving in high proportion after the spread of farming was therefore very surprising. That’s why Reich and his close collaborator, research fellow in genetics Nick Patterson, had hypothesized the existence of this third source population, the Ancient North Eurasians..."
    this quotes mention the discovery of Ancient North Eurasian which is old news , what do you mean by the research you was waiting for?

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-29-2019, 06:43 PM
  2. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-16-2018, 09:16 PM
  3. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-11-2017, 08:13 PM
  4. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 09-27-2017, 11:14 PM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-16-2017, 10:55 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •