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Thread: What next?

  1. #1
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    What next?

    Hi Guys, I tested with Britains DNA earlier this year. Very pleased with the results etc.

    I am keen to take things further if at all possible.

    What would you do next?

    Cheers, Ade.

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  3. #2
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    Well, in what direction would you like to take them further? If you want to go in-depth with your Y-DNA I'd say you want FTDNA, or possibly spring for FGC's Y Elite right away.

    For mtDNA, FTDNA's mtFullSequence is probably the way to go. While you do get mtDNA sequencing from BIG Y and Y Elite too, it's apparently not quite as reliable as dedicated mito sequencing.

    If you want to dig deeper into your autosomal DNA, which appears to be the weakest part of Chromo2, you could go for either 23andMe or for FTDNA's Family Finder. Definitely FTDNA if genealogy is your main objective. 23andMe is a bit more all-round and appears to have the best ethnicity analysis (Ancestry Composition) currently. Both products allow you to download your raw autosomal and X data to feed into various third-party tools like GEDmatch (various ethnicity calculators, eye colour prediction, genealogical matches across the boundaries between different labs), Promethease (health report), etc.

    Finally, if you're mostly after a "second opinion" on your BritainsDNA results, you could go for Geno 2.0. That would also allow you to transfer your results (but only Y-DNA and mtDNA SNP calls) to FTDNA, and they can then perform further testing of the sample you sent in, since FTDNA's lab is doing the lab work for NatGeo anyway.
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  5. #3
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    Thanks for the input, much appreciated.

    I have thought of testing with FTDNA. The genetic genealogy bit is something I do have a small interest in. But I don't hold out a great deal of hope on that. Being in the UK it seems few people test compared with those in the USA. If I do join, I will certainly do it via the Stevenson surname project and go straight for 111 markers. In for a penny in for a pound as they say....

    I may give Family Finder a go first.

    My real dream (like most of us I guess) would be to tie down my Y DNA results to a tribe and a given location.

    Cheers, Ade.

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  7. #4
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    Well if you are I1, you've already had a lot more luck than many who find that they are somewhere in that huge group of R1bs. So, be thankful for small mercies.

    It's unlikely that you will get down to a tribe. Germanic, whether northern or western, change their names frequently, but you might get back to rough geographic locations.

    I'm P109 and live in Yorkshire but we had little to do with danelaw settlers, the paper trail suggests we came from the March of Flanders in the 12th century. Genetics is fast food for genealogists. It's full of stuff that you don't want or need and can be bad for your health.

    Having said that researching paper trails is a lot more costly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Stevenson View Post
    Thanks for the input, much appreciated.

    I have thought of testing with FTDNA. The genetic genealogy bit is something I do have a small interest in. But I don't hold out a great deal of hope on that. Being in the UK it seems few people test compared with those in the USA. If I do join, I will certainly do it via the Stevenson surname project and go straight for 111 markers. In for a penny in for a pound as they say....

    I may give Family Finder a go first.

    My real dream (like most of us I guess) would be to tie down my Y DNA results to a tribe and a given location.

    Cheers, Ade.
    That sounds like the best way to go. If you were in the US, I would recommend AncestryDNA but FTDNA is still great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by authun View Post
    Genetics is fast food for genealogists. It's full of stuff that you don't want or need and can be bad for your health.

    Having said that researching paper trails is a lot more costly.
    Many people simply do not have a paper trail to follow. The reasons vary. A county court house within 5 miles of my house was burned down in 1830 and 1862. Another one about 35 miles away, was burned down the third time in the 1860s. My people lived a similar distance to the former and about 10 miles away from the second. Hence, even my best paper trail, deriving from the court house 10 miles away (the one for my county), has breaks in its records.
    Some people just seem to appear in the record trail. I've been researching 30 years and I still don't know the surname of one great-great grandmother. The paper trail on at least two others basically starts when they got married so I cannot delve any further into their past.
    Another complication is known illegitimacy --which impacts my tree in the mid to late 19th century.
    I think all of my research "happy dances" in the last 10-15 years are due to finding out deep ancestors, not the closer ones. At least three of these "new" ancestors were from the early 1700s, in the case of the former two I was looking something else at the time and had to re-read the documents to see the connection.
    Autosomal Genetics can, and in my case has, (fairly conclusively) proved connections that otherwise cannot be made. It may be tedious to figure out how of is related to ones genetic matches but the fact remains you are starting off with the fact that you are related. One technique, that I use, is to test members on both sides of your family, preferably parents. At least for very close matches, when you get the case the only one parent matches the person then you know the connection is on that particular side of the family. I had a genetic match, but a murky paper trail. I tested my mom and paternal uncle (as proxy to my father). Mom was not a match, my uncle was --and to an larger extent to myself. This proved the connection was on my paternal side of the family, and helped verify the trail.
    One less expensive, but just as valuable, was the instance I posted on the "Happy Dance thread." Genetics proved by father and my maternal grandfather were related. This was not a foregone conclusion from the paper trail. Though there could be alternate ways, at present the ancestor I mentioned seems to be the connection.
    Also, mtGenome and Y-SNP (and to some extent STR) testing are good to DISPROVE errant connections, thus saving people from wasting time and effort in following red herrings in the paper trail.
    As NGS testing advances I think Y-DNA will prove connections never thought of, due to surname changes, etc.
    Later,
    dp :-)
    PS: sorry Ade...off topic for what you started the thread.
    Last edited by dp; 11-08-2014 at 05:03 PM.
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  12. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Stevenson View Post
    I may give Family Finder a go first.
    After you do that think about uploading your results to GEDmatch. That way you can see who you may match no matter if they tested with FamilyTreeDNA, 23andme, or Ancestry. I've been working on a line and noticed that basically 1/3rd of the matches are from each company. I also like that you can, if you have a very private relative, place a kit as research so it doesn't appear in other's one-to-many listings.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Stevenson View Post
    My real dream (like most of us I guess) would be to tie down my Y DNA results to a tribe and a given location.
    Well I'm not that far. I don't trust my surname to indicate such origins. When the Y-DNA haplogroups coalesce --which is different than MRCA-- and where, would determine the possibilities for tribes, clans, etc. (in their language, ethnicity, etc.)
    later,
    dp :-)
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  14. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Powell View Post
    Many people simply do not have a paper trail to follow.

    Of course paper trails are very patchy and illegitimacy, or in future AID, will cause further headaches.

    However, given that people are unlikely to 'find tribes' in their past, whatever you can find in a paper trail has personal interest. I am P109, but am I a Geat, or a Jute, or a Fleming or a Norman which is what the english called us?

    And of course, one can do both. They are not mutually exclusive. Often minor things turn out to be of great interest.

    But I agree, the loss of most WW1 war records is a blow to my research into my grandfather's role in the Great War. Fortunately, I know he was in the 1st/4th East Yorks so I can reconstruct some of it.

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  16. #9
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    Been a while since I updated this thread. Work and family commitments etc.

    So today I have finally purchased a Family Finder kit from FTDNA as it was discounted by $40

    I will post my results once I have them.

    Cheers, Ade.

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  18. #10
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    Look forward to seeing the results Adrian. Do you know much of your family history and recorded ancestry in terms of paper trail?
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