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Thread: Albanian DNA Project

  1. #1941
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXD View Post
    Thank you for your very interesting response! Again as a non-speaker of Albanian, could the Labin/Rabac discrepancy stem from Albanians migrating in different time periods, where in the first one Alb- was preferred, and a later migration used Arb- instead?
    In my opinion, alb- is a phonetic fluctuation from arb- as many /l/ changes in languages which exhibit /l/ - /r/ instability. Both alb-/arb- were used interchangeably for a long period so Albona and Arbona were probably used in the same era. Arb-/Alb-, however, are not exclusively linked to the Arbi/Albani tribe and the metathesis from Alb-/Arb- may have been also at play at some stage of antiquity before the Slavic migrations.

    The name of the Labeatae around Lake Shkodra could be read as Albeatae: The Lab- particle represents a metathesis from Alb- > Lab-, which itself could be related to the appearance of the ethnonym of the Albanians in the same area. It is present in hydronyms like the Lab river and toponyms like LlapashticŰ along the later Roman route from Lissus to Ulpiana and indicates the movement of Illyrian tribes from the interior of Illyria to the coastline or vice versa. See Yves Edouard Boeglin: La riviŔre 'Lab' de Serbie:

    It is certainly tempting to compare our Lab with the name of the Labeates, established at the beginning of the Christian era in the region of Scutari but who came, perhaps, from inland. In this regard, I will indicate that there is an E-W line on which we find: 1) the river Lab; 2) a Labljani village, near Pristina, therefore not far from Lab (..); 3) a village of the same name near Pec, already indicated in the Zica charter (13th century, Labljani) (..) 4) the region of Lake Scutari where the Labeates settled at the beginning of our era. Obviously, in the current state of our knowledge, it is not possible for us to indicate whether it would be a migration from E to W, i.e. from the interior of Illyria to the sea, or vice versa. This meeting of four names in Lab- in this area between the Lab and the Labeates, however, deserved to be noted, especially since the line Lab, Labljani I, Labljani II, Labeates corresponds fairly well to the road going from Ulpiana to Lissus . [..] On the other hand, the name of the Labeates is itself still a mystery, and it is perhaps not unrelated to the name of the nearby Albanians, the ALB> LAB metathesis not always being , as we think too often, a phonetic phenomenon brought by the Slavs

    In that case, Arb-/Alb- would be a name which was used throughout the western Balkans. It was not an exclusive name used only by the Albani tribe.

    Quote Originally Posted by XXD View Post
    I think it is clear that Albanian paternal lines reach their greatest diversity in the north of the country, as well as Kosovo, and parts of Montenegro and southern Serbia. So the origins of Albanians from a Dardanian-Daco-Moesian or Illyrian people in North-Central Albania makes a lot of sense. It is incredible how some highland populations have essentially no Slavic Y-dna (based on Rrenjet). If we all agree that there was a southward migration of Albanians to the rest of what is now Albania at some point, what type of people were inhabiting that part of Albania/Epirus at that time. Slavs, Greeks, Grecoslavs? Or was the area completely deserted?

    OK, there are more Slavic paternal lines in southern Albania, but this could be from later Bulgarian settlements, as some of the posters here have already indicated. But J2a is higher there and R-Y32042 is quite diverse too - do they merely represent founder effects, or something else? We should not forget that Epirus was fairly cosmopolitan prior to the slavic migrations, and boasted both Greek-speaking Romans and likely non-romanised/hellenised Illyrian speakers in rural areas. Did this population disappear? It could have, in the same way that Illyrians were completely absorbed by Slavs in Croatia and the northern Adriatic.
    Various subclades under R-Z29758 are good candidates for an Illyrian population which lived in south-central Albania and I-M223 (found among the Daunians) reaches its peak in central Albania (I-S25733). I-S25733 and R-Z29758 are lineages which have some of the oldest TMRCA among Albanians. As for J2a, it has a very random distribution among Albanians which suggests that it comes from many different sources/eras.

    In my opinion, southern Albania and Epirus were sparsely populated when the Slavs arrived in the area. Greeks definitely lived mostly in urban centers but also various rural enclaves .At least some Albanians must have lived in LabŰria because the toponym LabŰria is a metathesis from Alb- presumably from the era the Slavs reached the Ionian sea, but few Albanians lived beyond that area. The other two enclaves of Albanian settlement in the 7th century upon the arrival of the Slavs and the later Bulgarian expansion must have been the mountains of Skrapar (see E-FGC11457) and the region of Pogradec because both have high E-V13 and very low or non-existent R1a/I2a-Din. (When visualized it becomes clear that these areas were enclaves)

    Beyond these enclaves, much of Epirus in my opinion was for a few centuries inhabited mostly by Slavs or more precisely, Bulgarians and Bulgarian Vlachs. The retreat of the Slavs began with the campaigns of Basil II against Bulgaria and gradually they intermarried with Greeks and Albanians who expanded from west/south and north respectively. Depending on the circumstances in later centuries the descendants of the Slavs and the natives were Greeks or Albanians. Still, in the 15th-16th century most names of the people of places like Dropull are not Albanian or Greek (as people who fight on the internet on both sides believe), but Slavic. It's also clear that they saw themselves as different from Greeks and Albanians until late as the people of Vagenetia were strong supporters of Thomas Preljubović (late 14th century) against the urban Greeks of Ioannina and the Albanian tribes.

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  3. #1942
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruzmi View Post
    In my opinion, alb- is a phonetic fluctuation from arb- as many /l/ changes in languages which exhibit /l/ - /r/ instability. Both alb-/arb- were used interchangeably for a long period so Albona and Arbona were probably used in the same era. Arb-/Alb-, however, are not exclusively linked to the Arbi/Albani tribe and the metathesis from Alb-/Arb- may have been also at play at some stage of antiquity before the Slavic migrations.

    The name of the Labeatae around Lake Shkodra could be read as Albeatae: The Lab- particle represents a metathesis from Alb- > Lab-, which itself could be related to the appearance of the ethnonym of the Albanians in the same area. It is present in hydronyms like the Lab river and toponyms like LlapashticŰ along the later Roman route from Lissus to Ulpiana and indicates the movement of Illyrian tribes from the interior of Illyria to the coastline or vice versa. See Yves Edouard Boeglin: La riviŔre 'Lab' de Serbie:

    It is certainly tempting to compare our Lab with the name of the Labeates, established at the beginning of the Christian era in the region of Scutari but who came, perhaps, from inland. In this regard, I will indicate that there is an E-W line on which we find: 1) the river Lab; 2) a Labljani village, near Pristina, therefore not far from Lab (..); 3) a village of the same name near Pec, already indicated in the Zica charter (13th century, Labljani) (..) 4) the region of Lake Scutari where the Labeates settled at the beginning of our era. Obviously, in the current state of our knowledge, it is not possible for us to indicate whether it would be a migration from E to W, i.e. from the interior of Illyria to the sea, or vice versa. This meeting of four names in Lab- in this area between the Lab and the Labeates, however, deserved to be noted, especially since the line Lab, Labljani I, Labljani II, Labeates corresponds fairly well to the road going from Ulpiana to Lissus . [..] On the other hand, the name of the Labeates is itself still a mystery, and it is perhaps not unrelated to the name of the nearby Albanians, the ALB> LAB metathesis not always being , as we think too often, a phonetic phenomenon brought by the Slavs

    In that case, Arb-/Alb- would be a name which was used throughout the western Balkans. It was not an exclusive name used only by the Albani tribe.



    Various subclades under R-Z29758 are good candidates for an Illyrian population which lived in south-central Albania and I-M223 (found among the Daunians) reaches its peak in central Albania (I-S25733). I-S25733 and R-Z29758 are lineages which have some of the oldest TMRCA among Albanians. As for J2a, it has a very random distribution among Albanians which suggests that it comes from many different sources/eras.

    In my opinion, southern Albania and Epirus were sparsely populated when the Slavs arrived in the area. Greeks definitely lived mostly in urban centers but also various rural enclaves .At least some Albanians must have lived in LabŰria because the toponym LabŰria is a metathesis from Alb- presumably from the era the Slavs reached the Ionian sea, but few Albanians lived beyond that area. The other two enclaves of Albanian settlement in the 7th century upon the arrival of the Slavs and the later Bulgarian expansion must have been the mountains of Skrapar (see E-FGC11457) and the region of Pogradec because both have high E-V13 and very low or non-existent R1a/I2a-Din. (When visualized it becomes clear that these areas were enclaves)

    Beyond these enclaves, much of Epirus in my opinion was for a few centuries inhabited mostly by Slavs or more precisely, Bulgarians and Bulgarian Vlachs. The retreat of the Slavs began with the campaigns of Basil II against Bulgaria and gradually they intermarried with Greeks and Albanians who expanded from west/south and north respectively. Depending on the circumstances in later centuries the descendants of the Slavs and the natives were Greeks or Albanians. Still, in the 15th-16th century most names of the people of places like Dropull are not Albanian or Greek (as people who fight on the internet on both sides believe), but Slavic. It's also clear that they saw themselves as different from Greeks and Albanians until late as the people of Vagenetia were strong supporters of Thomas Preljubović (late 14th century) against the urban Greeks of Ioannina and the Albanian tribes.
    In your opinion, based on the historiography, what was the geographic extent or territory of the Albanians from the period of the Slavic migrations (sixth and seventh centuries CE) until the formation of the Principality of Arbanon in 1190 CE?
    Ydna: J1>P58>YSC234>ZS241>BY32817 (Y179831)

    Maternal Ydna: E-V13>CTS1273*

    Mtdna: T1a1l

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  5. #1943
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruzmi View Post
    In my opinion, alb- is a phonetic fluctuation from arb- as many /l/ changes in languages which exhibit /l/ - /r/ instability. Both alb-/arb- were used interchangeably for a long period so Albona and Arbona were probably used in the same era. Arb-/Alb-, however, are not exclusively linked to the Arbi/Albani tribe and the metathesis from Alb-/Arb- may have been also at play at some stage of antiquity before the Slavic migrations.

    The name of the Labeatae around Lake Shkodra could be read as Albeatae: The Lab- particle represents a metathesis from Alb- > Lab-, which itself could be related to the appearance of the ethnonym of the Albanians in the same area. It is present in hydronyms like the Lab river and toponyms like LlapashticŰ along the later Roman route from Lissus to Ulpiana and indicates the movement of Illyrian tribes from the interior of Illyria to the coastline or vice versa. See Yves Edouard Boeglin: La riviŔre 'Lab' de Serbie:

    It is certainly tempting to compare our Lab with the name of the Labeates, established at the beginning of the Christian era in the region of Scutari but who came, perhaps, from inland. In this regard, I will indicate that there is an E-W line on which we find: 1) the river Lab; 2) a Labljani village, near Pristina, therefore not far from Lab (..); 3) a village of the same name near Pec, already indicated in the Zica charter (13th century, Labljani) (..) 4) the region of Lake Scutari where the Labeates settled at the beginning of our era. Obviously, in the current state of our knowledge, it is not possible for us to indicate whether it would be a migration from E to W, i.e. from the interior of Illyria to the sea, or vice versa. This meeting of four names in Lab- in this area between the Lab and the Labeates, however, deserved to be noted, especially since the line Lab, Labljani I, Labljani II, Labeates corresponds fairly well to the road going from Ulpiana to Lissus . [..] On the other hand, the name of the Labeates is itself still a mystery, and it is perhaps not unrelated to the name of the nearby Albanians, the ALB> LAB metathesis not always being , as we think too often, a phonetic phenomenon brought by the Slavs

    In that case, Arb-/Alb- would be a name which was used throughout the western Balkans. It was not an exclusive name used only by the Albani tribe.



    Various subclades under R-Z29758 are good candidates for an Illyrian population which lived in south-central Albania and I-M223 (found among the Daunians) reaches its peak in central Albania (I-S25733). I-S25733 and R-Z29758 are lineages which have some of the oldest TMRCA among Albanians. As for J2a, it has a very random distribution among Albanians which suggests that it comes from many different sources/eras.

    In my opinion, southern Albania and Epirus were sparsely populated when the Slavs arrived in the area. Greeks definitely lived mostly in urban centers but also various rural enclaves .At least some Albanians must have lived in LabŰria because the toponym LabŰria is a metathesis from Alb- presumably from the era the Slavs reached the Ionian sea, but few Albanians lived beyond that area. The other two enclaves of Albanian settlement in the 7th century upon the arrival of the Slavs and the later Bulgarian expansion must have been the mountains of Skrapar (see E-FGC11457) and the region of Pogradec because both have high E-V13 and very low or non-existent R1a/I2a-Din. (When visualized it becomes clear that these areas were enclaves)

    Beyond these enclaves, much of Epirus in my opinion was for a few centuries inhabited mostly by Slavs or more precisely, Bulgarians and Bulgarian Vlachs. The retreat of the Slavs began with the campaigns of Basil II against Bulgaria and gradually they intermarried with Greeks and Albanians who expanded from west/south and north respectively. Depending on the circumstances in later centuries the descendants of the Slavs and the natives were Greeks or Albanians. Still, in the 15th-16th century most names of the people of places like Dropull are not Albanian or Greek (as people who fight on the internet on both sides believe), but Slavic. It's also clear that they saw themselves as different from Greeks and Albanians until late as the people of Vagenetia were strong supporters of Thomas Preljubović (late 14th century) against the urban Greeks of Ioannina and the Albanian tribes.

    There were Greeks living in Southern Albania? How south?

  6. #1944
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    Quote Originally Posted by darknorman11 View Post
    There were Greeks living in Southern Albania? How south?
    Post-Hellenistic Greeks were concentrated in various enclaves in Epirus and the urban area of Ioannina as the Slavs expanded. The northernmost points in Albania are Anchesmos and Butrint/Bouthroton which probably had a Greek-speaking population until their abandonment in the late 6th/7th century. Anchesmos was abandoned under Slavic pressure and Butrint/Bouthroton because of environmental constraints, but was later repopulated. We should also not forget the Jewish presence in some urban centers.

    Anchiasmos (Onchesmos) in the 5th-7th centuries: city, pilgrimage, centre and port:


    The pottery taken under consideration is represented by a small number of exemplars dated to the end of the 4th century AD and coming from a very limited area near the sea shore, which will increase not only in quantity, but also in distribution in the 5th-6th century (Tab. VI, 18-30). The sigillata is represented by Eastern, Chandarli, African, Phocean, Cypriot, and Egyptian Sigillata.

    At the Monastery of 40 Saints it has been shown that, so far, sigillata is ten times less present in number than the amphorae, dating mainly to late 5th-mid 6th century AD, and is represented mostly by Phocean (form 3) rather than African imports. Besides sigillata, amphorae found in the city and at the Monastery of 40 Saints are of different origin, with the most dominating group being that of Eastern origin. The amphorae found in the city belong in greater part to the 5th-6th century, while those of the 3rd-4th century and of the 7th century are few in number and in forms. The sigillata discovered so far at Anchiasmos (ARS 109 C/Bonifay ST 60C, CRS 9B or Egyptian C, Egyptian B (imitation of the late B ) (Table VI 26, 29-30), along with some examples of amphorae (LRA 1B, LRA 2C, Spatheion 3 (Table IV, 1-3, Tab. V, 15, 17), and some cooking pots, the so-called “Slavic” ware (Table IV, 10, 11) are the only data that suggest a later date for the abandonment of this urban centre, at least as port, towards the second half of the 7th century AD. However, these scarce data are limited, coming only from the ruins of the basilica, and cannot weaken the conclusion, based on the historical events of the years 586-587, that the city was abandoned after this wave of Slavic invasion.


    The numerous amphorae found in the city and at the Monastery of the 40 Saints, where they are represented in several thousand specimens, are of different origin, including the Gaza Strip, Palestine, Egypt, Jordan, Turkey, Aegean, Black Sea, Tunisia, Libya, Italy, etc. (Tabs. IV - V). They were used to transport wine, olive oil, vinegar, sauces, spices, fruit, etc. Also, the presence of sigillata of different origins indicates that the port of Saranda had a significant role in the important sea route near the northern shores of the Mediterranean. In the development of this centre, a role played also presence of a Jewish community, documented not only in the city but also at the Monastery of 40 Saints.

    The data obtained from ceramics place the abandonment of the port towards middle of the 7th century AD. This date has shifted toward the time of the abandonment of the city of Butrint, which had suffered interruption of life for nearly a century not because of the invasions but due to the natural phenomenon of the increasing water level of the lake. After this time, only the high walls of the great centre of pilgrimage dedicated to the 40 Martyrs of Sebaste are what we have inherited today, while the town inherited not its own name but that of its monastery.
    Last edited by Bruzmi; 08-03-2021 at 03:00 PM.

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  8. #1945
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruzmi View Post
    In my opinion, alb- is a phonetic fluctuation from arb- as many /l/ changes in languages which exhibit /l/ - /r/ instability. Both alb-/arb- were used interchangeably for a long period so Albona and Arbona were probably used in the same era. Arb-/Alb-, however, are not exclusively linked to the Arbi/Albani tribe and the metathesis from Alb-/Arb- may have been also at play at some stage of antiquity before the Slavic migrations.

    The name of the Labeatae around Lake Shkodra could be read as Albeatae: The Lab- particle represents a metathesis from Alb- > Lab-, which itself could be related to the appearance of the ethnonym of the Albanians in the same area. It is present in hydronyms like the Lab river and toponyms like LlapashticŰ along the later Roman route from Lissus to Ulpiana and indicates the movement of Illyrian tribes from the interior of Illyria to the coastline or vice versa. See Yves Edouard Boeglin: La riviŔre 'Lab' de Serbie:

    It is certainly tempting to compare our Lab with the name of the Labeates, established at the beginning of the Christian era in the region of Scutari but who came, perhaps, from inland. In this regard, I will indicate that there is an E-W line on which we find: 1) the river Lab; 2) a Labljani village, near Pristina, therefore not far from Lab (..); 3) a village of the same name near Pec, already indicated in the Zica charter (13th century, Labljani) (..) 4) the region of Lake Scutari where the Labeates settled at the beginning of our era. Obviously, in the current state of our knowledge, it is not possible for us to indicate whether it would be a migration from E to W, i.e. from the interior of Illyria to the sea, or vice versa. This meeting of four names in Lab- in this area between the Lab and the Labeates, however, deserved to be noted, especially since the line Lab, Labljani I, Labljani II, Labeates corresponds fairly well to the road going from Ulpiana to Lissus . [..] On the other hand, the name of the Labeates is itself still a mystery, and it is perhaps not unrelated to the name of the nearby Albanians, the ALB> LAB metathesis not always being , as we think too often, a phonetic phenomenon brought by the Slavs

    In that case, Arb-/Alb- would be a name which was used throughout the western Balkans. It was not an exclusive name used only by the Albani tribe.



    Various subclades under R-Z29758 are good candidates for an Illyrian population which lived in south-central Albania and I-M223 (found among the Daunians) reaches its peak in central Albania (I-S25733). I-S25733 and R-Z29758 are lineages which have some of the oldest TMRCA among Albanians. As for J2a, it has a very random distribution among Albanians which suggests that it comes from many different sources/eras.

    In my opinion, southern Albania and Epirus were sparsely populated when the Slavs arrived in the area. Greeks definitely lived mostly in urban centers but also various rural enclaves .At least some Albanians must have lived in LabŰria because the toponym LabŰria is a metathesis from Alb- presumably from the era the Slavs reached the Ionian sea, but few Albanians lived beyond that area. The other two enclaves of Albanian settlement in the 7th century upon the arrival of the Slavs and the later Bulgarian expansion must have been the mountains of Skrapar (see E-FGC11457) and the region of Pogradec because both have high E-V13 and very low or non-existent R1a/I2a-Din. (When visualized it becomes clear that these areas were enclaves)

    Beyond these enclaves, much of Epirus in my opinion was for a few centuries inhabited mostly by Slavs or more precisely, Bulgarians and Bulgarian Vlachs. The retreat of the Slavs began with the campaigns of Basil II against Bulgaria and gradually they intermarried with Greeks and Albanians who expanded from west/south and north respectively. Depending on the circumstances in later centuries the descendants of the Slavs and the natives were Greeks or Albanians. Still, in the 15th-16th century most names of the people of places like Dropull are not Albanian or Greek (as people who fight on the internet on both sides believe), but Slavic. It's also clear that they saw themselves as different from Greeks and Albanians until late as the people of Vagenetia were strong supporters of Thomas Preljubović (late 14th century) against the urban Greeks of Ioannina and the Albanian tribes.
    Besides the Himara cluster do you know of any other areas of Southern Albania that have concentrations of J2a?

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    Hi Bruzmi,
    Can you please give us concrete examples concerning this statement: Still, in the 15th-16th century most names of the people of places like Dropull are not Albanian or Greek (as people who fight on the internet on both sides believe), but Slavic.
    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Exercitus View Post
    Hi Bruzmi,
    Can you please give us concrete examples concerning this statement: Still, in the 15th-16th century most names of the people of places like Dropull are not Albanian or Greek (as people who fight on the internet on both sides believe), but Slavic.
    Thanks
    Hey, Exercitus. Of course.

    Kostas Giakoumis (2002), The Monasteries of Jorgucat and Vanishte in Dropull and of Spelaio in Lunxheri as monuments and institutions during the Ottoman period in Albania (16th-19th centuries):

    The first invasion by a Slavonic army into the regions of Epirus Vetus occurred in 548/9. It was followed by four similar and highly destructive attacks in the 6`s and beginning of the 7th century by Avaro-Slav armies in 577/8,581-584,587 and 614-616306 These forays not only destroyed local defence and administrative organisations but also eliminated or displaced a major part of the population. According to Koder, in the case of Dropull, the peasant settlements, which had previously been built around the fortified city of Adrianoupolis (or Justinianoupolis) were destroyed, but the city itself was saved. After 1018, during the reign of Basil II, the thema (province) of Dryinoupolis was founded here.

    The local inhabitants and the Slavic immigrants eventually left the plains and settled close to the steep and precipitous summits of Mali i Gjere. ... The new settlements also acquired Slavonic names and these are reflected in the census of 1431/32 where there are more Slavic names (occasionally distorted) than Greek or Albanian. By the fifteenth century, Slavonic had disappeared as a spoken language.
    Last edited by Bruzmi; 08-03-2021 at 07:56 PM.

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  12. #1948
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    Mark Uci's Lezha: tempulli i historisŰ kombŰtare contains a section from the Ottoman defter or register of the Sanjak of Dukagjin from the year 1570 on the city of Lezha (and I believe the immediate surroundings such as Varosh and Ishull LezhŰ) in north-western Albania. Lezha was the core and central holding of the feudal Dukagjini family who held it until 1393, when they transferred the city to the Venetians. Lezha was also the site of the League of LezhŰ (1444) where the Albanian lords were united under the leadership of Skanderbeg against the Ottomans. The Ottomans would eventually take the city following the Siege of Shkodra in 1478-79 though it would unsuccessfully rise up under Venetian leadership briefly in 1501-06. The extract is in fact taken from Agim Parruca's and Selami Pulaha's Lezha dhe Shëngjini: vështrim historiko-gjeografik however I have yet to actually come across this book, though it is on my list. From the register, Lezha had a total of 143 households with 141 of those households being Christian (Roman Catholic) and only two Muslim and it is clear from the anthroponyms that the population was Albanian.

    Bard Kokagjini; Men Bardhi; Prend Gryka; Gjon Gjonima; Gjin Todori; Doda Naraši; Kola Krusa; Marin Bardi; Nina Duka; Giga Logoreci; Andrea Logoreci; Martin Shmaqi; Doda Sharagjini; Doda Bardi; Gjin Ishkamiza; Gjon Ishkami; Giga Potareci; Gjon Rensi; Kola Kajariqi; Nina Angjeli; Martin Gramshi; Pal Gjonima; Kola Bardi; Andro Mersi; Kola Shmaqi; Nina Gjuri; Prend Angjeli; Kola Zeza; Kola Deklaki; Gjon Barišori; Radosav Palojoviqi; Jak Laši; Kola Gjonima; Biba Jaka; Nina Gjershi; Andre Gjashi; Prend Vishri; Doda Drenica; Doda Bakši; Andre Tukshi; Pal Zahari; Nina Angjeli; Nina Marini; Gjin Ishkurka; Nina Sokoli; Andrea Dom Gjini; Gjika Nika; Grigor Suma; Likiš Flisi; Gika Bradi; Gika Itribi; Masar Gjuri; Gješ Gjashi; Mark Doda; Shtjefan Gjarpni; Gješ Dajši; Doda Sumja; Gjon Mirdita; Marin Malashi; Llazar Shirgji; Biba Reši; Prend Dajši; Andrea Dedashi; Kola Ilia; Kola Kuka; Nina Gramati; Andre Doda; Matiash Toma; Mark Shpani; Modo Bushati; Lika Mika; Martin Kukula; Nina Sokoli; Martin Gryka; Doda Badi; Gjegj Ishori; Kola Leka; Kola Teodori; Kuš Dukagjini; Lazar Gjarpni; Martin Napza; Kala Gjonima; Andrixhe Menxha; Biba Bushati; Kola Bardi; Menka Bardi; Manol Gryka; Luka Pekja; Giga Teodori; Nina Reši; Frank Ilia; Mark Plesha; Biba Naraši; Mark Llazari; Kola Miri; Gješ Logoreci; Gjin Nika; Doda Tukshi; Gjin Reši; Gjin Smaši; Luka Smaši; Andre Rici; Biba Zahari; Marin Reši; Kola Gjushi; Doda Skana; Biba Shpani; Martin Krusa; Doda Dom; Nina Dorashkalla; Prend Balori; Doda Sharagjini; Andrea Nika; Gjin Gjarpni; Brosek Naraši; Ulk Tukshi; Manol Xhakon; Ando Skura; Toma Plesha; Jovan Malšiši; Domenik Gjashi; Prend Shpalushi; Kola Shpanishkalla; Duka Shpanishkalla; Andrea Skana; Biba Skura; Lika Bushati; Hima Barbari; Prend Bogo; Petrit Kryekuqi; Gjon Dajši; Hysen Abdullahu; Kola Gjashi; Martin Gjashi; Bard Dukagjini; Kola Reši; Kola Bardi; Andre Lalza; Marin Mesi; Andre Gjuraqi.
    Last edited by Kelmendasi; 08-09-2021 at 02:24 PM.
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  14. #1949
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelmendasi View Post
    Mark Uci's Lezha: tempulli i historisŰ kombŰtare contains a section from the Ottoman defter or register of the Sanjak of Dukagjin from the year 1570 on the city of Lezha (and I believe the immediate surroundings such as Varosh and Ishull LezhŰ) in north-western Albania. Lezha was the core and central holding of the feudal Dukagjini family who held it until 1386, when they transferred the city to the Venetians. Lezha was also the site of the League of LezhŰ (1444) where the Albanian lords were united under the leadership of Skanderbeg against the Ottomans. The Ottomans would eventually take the city following the Siege of Shkodra in 1478-79 though it would unsuccessfully rise up under Venetian leadership briefly in 1501-06. The extract is in fact taken from Agim Parruca's and Selami Pulaha's Lezha dhe Shëngjini: vështrim historiko-gjeografik however I have yet to actually come across this book, though it is on my list. From the register, Lezha had a total of 143 households with 141 of those households being Christian (Roman Catholic) and only two Muslim and it is clear from the anthroponyms that the population was Albanian.

    Bard Kokagjini; Men Bardhi; Prend Gryka; Gjon Gjonima; Gjin Todori; Doda Naraši; Kola Krusa; Marin Bardi; Nina Duka; Giga Logoreci; Andrea Logoreci; Martin Shmaqi; Doda Sharagjini; Doda Bardi; Gjin Ishkamiza; Gjon Ishkami; Giga Potareci; Gjon Rensi; Kola Kajariqi; Nina Angjeli; Martin Gramshi; Pal Gjonima; Kola Bardi; Andro Mersi; Kola Shmaqi; Nina Gjuri; Prend Angjeli; Kola Zeza; Kola Deklaki; Gjon Barišori; Radosav Palojoviqi; Jak Laši; Kola Gjonima; Biba Jaka; Nina Gjershi; Andre Gjashi; Prend Vishri; Doda Drenica; Doda Bakši; Andre Tukshi; Pal Zahari; Nina Angjeli; Nina Marini; Gjin Ishkurka; Nina Sokoli; Andrea Dom Gjini; Gjika Nika; Grigor Suma; Likiš Flisi; Gika Bradi; Gika Itribi; Masar Gjuri; Gješ Gjashi; Mark Doda; Shtjefan Gjarpni; Gješ Dajši; Doda Sumja; Gjon Mirdita; Marin Malashi; Llazar Shirgji; Biba Reši; Prend Dajši; Andrea Dedashi; Kola Ilia; Kola Kuka; Nina Gramati; Andre Doda; Matiash Toma; Mark Shpani; Modo Bushati; Lika Mika; Martin Kukula; Nina Sokoli; Martin Gryka; Doda Badi; Gjegj Ishori; Kola Leka; Kola Teodori; Kuš Dukagjini; Lazar Gjarpni; Martin Napza; Kala Gjonima; Andrixhe Menxha; Biba Bushati; Kola Bardi; Menka Bardi; Manol Gryka; Luka Pekja; Giga Teodori; Nina Reši; Frank Ilia; Mark Plesha; Biba Naraši; Mark Llazari; Kola Miri; Gješ Logoreci; Gjin Nika; Doda Tukshi; Gjin Reši; Gjin Smaši; Luka Smaši; Andre Rici; Biba Zahari; Marin Reši; Kola Gjushi; Doda Skana; Biba Shpani; Martin Krusa; Doda Dom; Nina Dorashkalla; Prend Balori; Doda Sharagjini; Andrea Nika; Gjin Gjarpni; Brosek Naraši; Ulk Tukshi; Manol Xhakon; Ando Skura; Toma Plesha; Jovan Malšiši; Domenik Gjashi; Prend Shpalushi; Kola Shpanishkalla; Duka Shpanishkalla; Andrea Skana; Biba Skura; Lika Bushati; Hima Barbari; Prend Bogo; Petrit Kryekuqi; Gjon Dajši; Hysen Abdullahu; Kola Gjashi; Martin Gjashi; Bard Dukagjini; Kola Reši; Kola Bardi; Andre Lalza; Marin Mesi; Andre Gjuraqi.
    Awesome
    Gjashi might be related to Gashi? Or

  15. #1950
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    Quote Originally Posted by BukeKrypEZemer View Post
    Awesome
    Gjashi might be related to Gashi? Or
    In the highlands to the east of Lezha (MalŰsia e LezhŰs) there is a small settlement called GjashŰ which historically and traditionally belonged to the bajrak of Vela. It is possible that the attestation of this family name in Lezha suggests a movement from that settlement into the city, however in the Venetian cadastre of 1416-17 a certain Progan Gjansi is recorded in Kakarriq. So perhaps the village to the east of Lezha took its name from this fis or brotherhood, or that this Progan Gjansi also arrived from or had origins from GjashŰ.

    The Ottoman register does make it clear that a number of fise that were recorded in previous Venetian and Ottoman registers settled in the city, arriving from the north. This is indicated by family names such as Bushati, Dajši, Naraši, Sum(j)a and others. Individuals likely belonging to the same fis as the feudal Albanian families are also recorded. For example multiple individuals related to the Jonima (also Gjonima, GjonŰmi): Gjon Gjonima, Pal Gjonima, Kola Gjonima, and Kala Gjonima.
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