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Thread: What Hindi/Punjabi/Urdu song are you listening to

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    I think there is only one guy that is composing music and lyrics of high caliber in the Punjabi language. This is the only case where I can forgive the substitution of Indian instruments for Western (this is coming from a guy who thinks the harmonium has damaged Indian music).

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    A guy singing in his native tongue like a wannabe Tupac Shakur is high caliber ?
    Last edited by pegasus; 05-21-2015 at 02:53 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pegasus View Post
    A guy singing in his native tongue like a wannabe Tupac Shakur is high caliber ?
    The lyrical content is good, that's all. Rapping is not really singing, it is more about the poetry at the end of the day. Any verse can be delivered over a different beat, or no beat, quality rap poetry is about the verses at the end of the day. Like I said, I would prefer background music to be dholaks and sarangis. By the way, new instruments are created everyday in villages all across the subcontinent, so there is no need to call something an old instrument and something else to be "modern".
    I am not a Punjabi-native speaker, so I am only extrapolating my Hindi knowledge to gauge how good his lyrical content is, which is also not a native tongue for me. I have seen this guy in interviews, he would do this poetry for free. And his Desi influences are people like NFAK, Bulleh Shah, Mirza Ghalib, etc, so his work is very much rooted imo.

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    Being a good poet does not equate to being a good musician. Harmonium to the contrary has been fundamental in the development of music styles. Its central to NW South Asian musical forms, esp Sufi/ Islamic devotional music as well as Sikh religious music. Its also quite popular in Afghanistan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pegasus View Post
    Being a good poet does not equate to being a good musician. Harmonium to the contrary has been fundamental in the development of music styles. Its central to NW South Asian musical forms, esp Sufi/ Islamic devotional music as well as Sikh religious music. Its also quite popular in Afghanistan.
    Something being convenient and cheaply mass produced does not mean it becomes "central" to aforementioned genres of music. This is like saying safety pin is central to the wearing of a saree LOL. Do most women that wear sarees now prefer to have safety pins at hand? Sure. Is it central to it? Not at all.

    If you are a serious student of South Asian music, I'd suggest this long and well articulated article that examines both the pros and cons of the harmonium:
    http://www.academia.edu/908363/That_..._the_Harmonium

    Yes, the harmonium is convenient. You don't need a hand-made personalized tanpura to learn your sa-re-ga-ma's, so every mai-ka-lal can now get classical lessons at home without too much investment like seeking out an actual pandit/ustad and enrolling full-time at a gharana. But it also puts a limit to how good your music is. People like Nusrat were genius despite of the accompanying harmoniums. Matter of fact, Nusrat is probably one of those voices like Tansen that only comes once every 500 years or so, he'll still sound good even if you put heavy metal guitars droning out his voice LOL.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pegasus View Post
    Being a good poet does not equate to being a good musician. Harmonium to the contrary has been fundamental in the development of music styles. Its central to NW South Asian musical forms, esp Sufi/ Islamic devotional music as well as Sikh religious music. Its also quite popular in Afghanistan.
    Rappers are not poets, let alone good poets. They wouldn't known good poetry if you smacked them on the head with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bored View Post
    Rappers are not poets, let alone good poets. They wouldn't known good poetry if you smacked them on the head with it.
    Its your perspective. Tupac,Dr.Dre, Naz... would disagree with you.

    If you listen to this kinda rap then I would agree with you.
    Last edited by surbakhunWeesste; 06-14-2015 at 06:30 PM.

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  13. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by bored View Post
    Rappers are not poets, let alone good poets. They wouldn't known good poetry if you smacked them on the head with it.
    Well if your thinking of rap today yes, but to begin with rap was a street poetry which was born out of Urban American poverty in the mid late 70s , if you watch Blaxploitation movies such as Dolemite, you can see its early forms. By the early 80s , many rappers dealt with serious themes such as Urban Decay and Crime. Their verses are poetry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zahra View Post
    Its your perspective. Tupac,Dr.Dre, Naz... would disagree with you.

    If you listen to this kinda rap then I would agree with you.
    Most published poetry is pretty much shit these days so maybe rappers can call themselves poets too. And no, I don't listen to anything of the sort. Interesting and amusing suggestion, though.

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