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Thread: R1b-U106 in Swedish Battle Axe Culture (a Corded Ware subgroup)

  1. #201
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    Since we are discussing a bit about Z156 and L48 and Z18 (so Northern and Southern groups of U106) I did a quick count of the current kits for z156 including subgroups like Z304, DF96, and DF98. Left out any marked United States or unknown origin, and looked at clusters of closely related surnames and general didn't count one for each one as they can skew the data. Here is roughly what I found for Z156 as a group in the U106 DNA project... logging in under my kit so I could see kits set to show only to members etc.

    Z156 out of 303 samples keeping in mind we have a Western Bias of course... and total there are more than 303 kits... but the additional ones were either United States (doesn't tell us anything other than descendants of immigrants duh!) and Unknown... or blank for origin...

    Spain = 3
    Scotland = 36
    England = 83
    France = 15
    United Kingdom = 15
    Ireland = 40
    Italy = 1
    Germany = 50
    Austria = 2
    Belgium = 7
    Portugal = 1
    New Zealand = 2
    Switzerland = 1
    Greece = 1
    Netherlands = 5
    Sweden = 11
    Norway = 5
    Poland = 7
    Denmark = 3
    Hungary = 2
    Wales = 4
    Estonia = 1
    Finland = 5
    Mexico = 1
    Jamaica = 1
    Brazil = 1
    Y-DNA: 4th GGF Adam Weaver born 1785 in Pennsylvania - Sergeant in US 17th Infantry, War of 1812: R1b-U106-Z381-Z156-Z305/306/307-Z304-DF98-S1911-S1894/S1900-S4004/FGC14818/FGC14823-FGC14816/FGC14817. I share these SNPs w/ York Gladiator 6drif-3

    mtDNA: 3rd GGM Bridget Dana b. 1843 Ireland - MtDNA - T2b2b - most common in Ireland, connection to Scandinavia (T2b2b most common in Ireland/Scan) aka T2b female warrior burial Grave Bj 581 near Birka, Sweden.

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     Finn (03-18-2018), rms2 (03-18-2018), wlk (03-31-2018)

  3. #202
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    I have a feeling if I did the same count for L48 and Z18 - it would have a somewhat opposite distribution in regards to Scandinavia... but also Isles heavy...
    Y-DNA: 4th GGF Adam Weaver born 1785 in Pennsylvania - Sergeant in US 17th Infantry, War of 1812: R1b-U106-Z381-Z156-Z305/306/307-Z304-DF98-S1911-S1894/S1900-S4004/FGC14818/FGC14823-FGC14816/FGC14817. I share these SNPs w/ York Gladiator 6drif-3

    mtDNA: 3rd GGM Bridget Dana b. 1843 Ireland - MtDNA - T2b2b - most common in Ireland, connection to Scandinavia (T2b2b most common in Ireland/Scan) aka T2b female warrior burial Grave Bj 581 near Birka, Sweden.

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  5. #203
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    Here is that Czech paper I found plenty of info for Unetice cemeteries (including Jinonice where I7196 was buried) in Prague 5 - the text of the main paper is 22 mb and downloadable along with supplemental stuff ;-): https://is.cuni.cz/webapps/zzp/detail/93742/
    Y-DNA: 4th GGF Adam Weaver born 1785 in Pennsylvania - Sergeant in US 17th Infantry, War of 1812: R1b-U106-Z381-Z156-Z305/306/307-Z304-DF98-S1911-S1894/S1900-S4004/FGC14818/FGC14823-FGC14816/FGC14817. I share these SNPs w/ York Gladiator 6drif-3

    mtDNA: 3rd GGM Bridget Dana b. 1843 Ireland - MtDNA - T2b2b - most common in Ireland, connection to Scandinavia (T2b2b most common in Ireland/Scan) aka T2b female warrior burial Grave Bj 581 near Birka, Sweden.

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  7. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bollox79 View Post
    and additionally Radboud and Finn... there is a paper that shows that Unetice aristocracy from a "princely barrow" in Poland... the Unetice barrow at Kąty
    Wrocławskie. There is evidence for his movement over long distances and possible times of scarce food... and his return and his people's recognition of this...

    He had similar grave goods as our I7196 U106 Unetice man (though note that U106 man had a bit more - but was also distrubed/robbed at a later date? : "There were two directly associated grave goods: a single
    pottery vessel and a double-coiled hair clip made of bronze
    wire, located near the head (cf. Moucha 2005, 350, 423,
    474)."

    I think his grave is carbon dated(?) to about 1785 B.C.

    Paper's conclusion: "Certain number of barrows located in Silesia suggests the
    presence of high status individuals and the development
    of specific centralized social institutions, within Unet-
    ice communities. Barrows are also known from Greater
    Poland (Łęki Małe; Knapowska-Mikołajczykowa 1957;
    Kowiańska-Piaszykowa 2008), and Germany (Leubin-
    gen, Helmsdorf, Baalberge, Dieskau II, Nienstedt, Klein-
    kornbetha, Hohenbergen, Sömmerda I-II, Königsaue and
    Österkörner; Gimbutas 1965, 262-268; Kadrow 2001,
    123; Steffen 2010, 19). Although, the highest concentra-
    tion of Uneticean barrows can be found in northern and
    central Bohemia (i.e. Brandýs, Březno, Mladá Boleslav-
    Čejetičky-Choboty, Horní Přím, Chotěšov, Kojetice,
    Konobrže, Litovice, Odolena Voda, Prague 5-Řeporyje,
    Prague 6-Bubeneč, Selibice, Stračovská Lhota, Toužetín,
    Tursko, Zlončice and Želeč; Danielisová 2013, 81,
    Kruťová and Turek 2004).
    Until today approximately 55 Uneticean barrows has been
    found in Central Europe. The majority of monuments was
    published in archaeological literature, but only approxi-
    mately 60% of that number has been excavated according
    to modern standards. The best preserved examples of the
    so-called princely graves in Silesia were located at Szcz-
    epankowice (Sarnowska 1969) and Kąty Wrocławskie, but
    the number of barrows situated around Wrocław was origi-
    nally much higher. A certain number of rich graves cov-
    ered with stone pavements are considered today to be the
    remains of destroyed barrows. Among these are: Kromo-
    lin, Gola Górowska with the remains of three monuments,
    Krzesin, Platków and possibly Kotla (Blajer 1990, 199;
    Sarnowska 1969, 89, 344). A barrow discovered in 1934 in
    Nowy Zagórz might have been associated with the Early
    Bronze Age: the inner core of the barrow was built of large
    stones forming a massive internal flange, typical for Unet-
    ice technology at that time. Another example derives from
    Groß Gastrose, first excavated by Jentsch in 1888, where a
    stone box was recorded beneath the burial mound (Butent-
    Stefaniak 1997, 188).
    The barrow in Kąty Wrocławskie may be interesting for
    a few reasons. First, is the location of the monument.
    The Unetice period can be characterized by new cultural
    phenomenon which is the blending of settlement with fu-
    nerary space, sacral and profane aspects of interment. A
    certain number of single, isolated inhumations have been
    discovered in Early Bronze Age settlements. Occasionally
    some parts of a cemetery may also overlap or intercut the
    space of the village. Examples of this practice derive from
    cemeteries in both Czechia (Slavkov, District Brno-Ven-
    kov) and southern Poland (e.g. Wojkowice), but also from
    Greater Poland like the single male skeleton discovered in
    Bruszczewo. The tomb in Kąty Wrocławskie was sited in
    the vicinity of the settlement (distance of approx. 200 m,
    unpublished materials) and it could be argued it was inten-
    tionally made visible. Therefore, the monument in Kąty
    Wrocławskie should be considered a feature that possessed
    an agreed-upon special meaning to a community of people.
    Barrows were more than just burials, they were markers of
    authority (cf. Binford 1971, Wason 1994). These types of
    graves take enormous amounts of effort and manpower to
    create, therefore were important political statements on the
    landscape, likely used to control trade routes, and marked
    control over land.
    Another issue is the biological profile of the tribal elites
    interred in barrows. Differential diet is one indicator of
    resource distribution within the society, not general cul-
    tural adaptation. In our analysis, isotopic evidence of diet
    was linked to lipid analysis of ceramics found in the bar-
    row. Data indicates a general absence of gender distinc-
    tion between those buried in princely graves. Moreover,
    their diet falls below average for the whole Early Bronze
    Age Silesian population, especially when compared to the
    population of Przecławice cemetery. The individual life
    history of an older male buried in Kąty Wrocławskie bar-
    row, especially his long-distance journey, combined with a
    potential episode of starvation, calls into question previous
    opinions regarding biological profiles of prehistoric elites
    (e.g. Haas 1982, 94).
    Nonetheless, what seems to be more important is the no-
    ticeable and specified distribution of power within local
    communities in SW Poland. In a study of the changes in
    pre-state social organization of Jutland, Parker Pearson
    (1984) observed that the variation among households in
    cattle keeping increased, and some individuals appear to
    have had greater access to this important basic subsistence
    resource than others. Despite the growing wealth for some,
    their poorest contemporaries were now poorer than anyone
    in earlier periods. Bioarchaeological data from Helmsdorf
    barrow indicate such scenario and progressive social dif-
    ferentiation in Uneticean populations in Germany. Howev-
    er, no such trend can be seen in Early Bronze Age Silesia.
    In fact, our investigation reveals socially distinct hierar-
    chical model with dynamic ranking system. All communi-
    ties sited around Wroclaw display astonishing uniformity
    in terms of subsistence and economic equality, with their
    elites being subjected to some form of collective control.
    In global terms, that may mean that princely graves, com-
    monly found in Early Bronze Age Bohemia, Poland and
    Germany; despite physical resemblance in fact represent
    different social and tribal institutions.
    The social arrangements between tribal leaders and their
    communities seem to be variable, negotiable and never
    static. I. Hodder once noted: ‘The relationship between
    material culture and human organization is partly social
    (…) But it is also dependant on a set of cultural attitudes
    which cannot be predicted from or reduced to an environ-
    ment. The cultural relationships are not caused by any-
    thing else outside themselves. They just are. The task of
    archaeologists is to interpret this irreducible component
    of culture so that society behind the material evidence can
    be ‘read’’ (Hodder 1991, 4).
    The social features such as ranking in the Unetice cultural
    hierarchy could have been expressed materially in a num-
    ber of ways. The bioarchaeological evidence from Kąty
    Wrocławskie presented in this study, evokes a long-forgot-
    ten reality of what power might have been: a story of a man
    who thousands of years ago set off on a long journey to
    the south, occupied in his times by Bohemian tribes of the
    Unetice Culture. Suffering from diseases and starving, he
    manage to come back home. It was also a story of his com-
    munity who waited for him, and by the end acknowledged
    his achievements. It shows that prehistoric leadership re-
    quired active involvement, and people were active agents.
    Therefore their behaviour was not fully predictable."


    Bioarchaeology of Social Inequality in the Unetice Culture: A case study. (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publica...e_A_case_study [accessed Mar 18 2018].

    Interesting find!!!

    Oostwoud could be likewise. What could they find in the Northern Netherlands along the coast? Amber!
    The women of Drenthe/North Dutch were the only one at that time in the Netherlands, along this of Denmark, Luneburger Heide and Southern Germany that wore amber in their necklaces.

    I have a likewise story as in Polen, 150 kilometer or so eastwards from Oostwoud in Drouwen/Drenthe you can find the biggest tumulus grave of the Northern European plain (it's still there fully unprotected).

    In the year 1927, A.E. van Giffen (1930, I: pp. 84-93; II: Abb. 78; cf. Butler, 1971, with further references) excavated the battered fragment of a prehistoric burial mound at Drouwen, and uncovered one of the richest Early Bronze Age graves ever found on the North European plain (fig. 16a- c). For richer Early Bronze Age burials we must go as far as the Fürstengräber of the Saale valley in Saxo-Thuringia, or the equally pretentious tumuli on the western end of the Armorican peninsula, or the richest of the chiefly graves of Wessex.
    By luck, the central inhumation burial under the Drouwen tumulus was still almost entirely undisturbed when van Giffen got there. He found, in a rectangular pit under a four-post mortuary house, a warrior’s grave, presumably that of a chiefly person. None of his grave goods - the sword with decorated blade; the flanged axe (geknickte Randbeil); the set of finely worked flint arrowheads; the polished whetstone; the flint strike-a-light; the coiled-wire gold earrings - are at all likely to be of local manufacture; they are all rare objects in the Netherlands. Probably the warrior himself came from a distance; though it is of course possible that he was a local figure who had acquired exotic accoutrements. Almost all the items have parallels in the ‘Sögel’ (or ‘Sögel-Wohlde’) group of Early Bronze Age male burials, extending across Northwest Germany to Jutland and Mecklenburg and southward to Hessen, though none of them contain so much of them all together. But, if the Drouwen warrior’s grave goods are exotic, the fact that he was buried there under a monumental tumulus (a recent excavation by J.N. Lanting, in October 1985, has shown that the tumulus was surrounded by a ring-ditch some 30 metres in diameter) argues that in life he must have had local authority.
    http://rjh.ub.rug.nl/Palaeohistoria/article/view/25026
    Last edited by Finn; 03-18-2018 at 10:38 PM.

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  9. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finn View Post
    Interesting find!!!

    Oostwoud could be likewise. What could they find in the Northern Netherlands along the coast? Amber!
    The women of Drenthe/North Dutch were the only one at that time in the Netherlands, along this of Denmark, Luneburger Heide and Southern Germany that wore amber in their necklaces.

    I have a likewise story as in Polen, 150 kilometer or so eastwards from Oostwoud in Drouwen/Drenthe you can find the biggest tumulus grave of the Northern European plain (it's still there fully unprotected).



    http://rjh.ub.rug.nl/Palaeohistoria/article/view/25026
    When I say we need more Unetice and Tumulus burials in Germany tested I also mean Elp/Sogel in Netherlands if at all possible (due to acidic soil in Netherlands?!?)... we need to see what haplogroups were in what cultures... there could have been several all included... including U106 ;-). I would like to see especially any Unetice in Germany... followed by tumulus in Germany (especially around Harz Mtn. and along the Rhine) along with Elp/Sogel from Netherlands :-).
    Y-DNA: 4th GGF Adam Weaver born 1785 in Pennsylvania - Sergeant in US 17th Infantry, War of 1812: R1b-U106-Z381-Z156-Z305/306/307-Z304-DF98-S1911-S1894/S1900-S4004/FGC14818/FGC14823-FGC14816/FGC14817. I share these SNPs w/ York Gladiator 6drif-3

    mtDNA: 3rd GGM Bridget Dana b. 1843 Ireland - MtDNA - T2b2b - most common in Ireland, connection to Scandinavia (T2b2b most common in Ireland/Scan) aka T2b female warrior burial Grave Bj 581 near Birka, Sweden.

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