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Thread: Ancient genomic DNA analysis of Jomon people (Kanzawa-Kiriyama 2013)

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by talljimmy0 View Post
    They are probably representative of a pre-ANE population with pacific aborigine mixture. Meaning, all ANE has some ancestral Jomon component (maternal side most likely).
    It could be the other way around as well, couldn't it? ANE > Jomon?

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Psynome View Post
    It could be the other way around as well, couldn't it? ANE > Jomon?
    Jomon group with East Eurasians and they donít show any particular affinity to Native Americans beyond what other Siberians/East Asians share. Yet there is a distant link to northwestern populations. To me this shows that ANE didnít come into Japanese Jomon more than they did to other Eastern populations, but the ancestors of Jomon once lived where ANE would spread and there mixing occurred. This ancestral Jomon population contributed slightly to ANE and predominantly, along with Eastern contribution, to the Jomon found in Japan.

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    On The Apricity, they're saying Gedmatch kit M592785 belongs to a Jomon sample.

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    New preprint on biorxiv: Jomon genome sheds light on East Asian population history

    Jomon genome sheds light on East Asian population history (Posted March 15, 2019)
    Abstract
    Anatomical modern humans reached East Asia by >40,000 years ago (kya). However, key questions still remain elusive with regard to the route(s) and the number of wave(s) in the dispersal into East Eurasia. Ancient genomes at the edge of East Eurasia may shed light on the detail picture of peopling to East Eurasia. Here, we analyze the whole-genome sequence of a 2.5 kya individual (IK002) characterized with a typical Jomon culture that started in the Japanese archipelago >16 kya. The phylogenetic analyses support multiple waves of migration, with IK002 forming a lineage basal to the rest of the ancient/present-day East Eurasians examined, likely to represent some of the earliest-wave migrants who went north toward East Asia from Southeast Asia. Furthermore, IK002 has the extra genetic affinity with the indigenous Taiwan aborigines, which may support a coastal route of the Jomon-ancestry migration from Southeast Asia to the Japanese archipelago. This study highlight the power of ancient genomics with the isolated population to provide new insights into complex history in East Eurasia.

    From the Discussion section of the paper:
    These results fit the hypothesis that the Ainu and the Jomon share the common ancestor:
    the present-day mainland Japanese are the hybrid between the Jomon and migrants from the East
    Eurasian continent, and the Hokkaido Ainu have less influence of genetic contribution of the
    migrants.
    Last edited by pmokeefe; 03-15-2019 at 09:08 PM. Reason: additional quote from paper
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

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    Quote Originally Posted by pmokeefe View Post
    Jomon genome sheds light on East Asian population history (Posted March 15, 2019)
    Abstract
    Anatomical modern humans reached East Asia by >40,000 years ago (kya). However, key questions still remain elusive with regard to the route(s) and the number of wave(s) in the dispersal into East Eurasia. Ancient genomes at the edge of East Eurasia may shed light on the detail picture of peopling to East Eurasia. Here, we analyze the whole-genome sequence of a 2.5 kya individual (IK002) characterized with a typical Jomon culture that started in the Japanese archipelago >16 kya. The phylogenetic analyses support multiple waves of migration, with IK002 forming a lineage basal to the rest of the ancient/present-day East Eurasians examined, likely to represent some of the earliest-wave migrants who went north toward East Asia from Southeast Asia. Furthermore, IK002 has the extra genetic affinity with the indigenous Taiwan aborigines, which may support a coastal route of the Jomon-ancestry migration from Southeast Asia to the Japanese archipelago. This study highlight the power of ancient genomics with the isolated population to provide new insights into complex history in East Eurasia.

    From the Discussion section of the paper:
    These results fit the hypothesis that the Ainu and the Jomon share the common ancestor:
    the present-day mainland Japanese are the hybrid between the Jomon and migrants from the East
    Eurasian continent, and the Hokkaido Ainu have less influence of genetic contribution of the
    migrants.
    Note: this sample, IK002 was published previously, together with ancient South-East Asian genomes: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/6397/88

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  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmokeefe View Post
    Jomon genome sheds light on East Asian population history (Posted March 15, 2019)
    Abstract
    Anatomical modern humans reached East Asia by >40,000 years ago (kya). However, key questions still remain elusive with regard to the route(s) and the number of wave(s) in the dispersal into East Eurasia. Ancient genomes at the edge of East Eurasia may shed light on the detail picture of peopling to East Eurasia. Here, we analyze the whole-genome sequence of a 2.5 kya individual (IK002) characterized with a typical Jomon culture that started in the Japanese archipelago >16 kya. The phylogenetic analyses support multiple waves of migration, with IK002 forming a lineage basal to the rest of the ancient/present-day East Eurasians examined, likely to represent some of the earliest-wave migrants who went north toward East Asia from Southeast Asia. Furthermore, IK002 has the extra genetic affinity with the indigenous Taiwan aborigines, which may support a coastal route of the Jomon-ancestry migration from Southeast Asia to the Japanese archipelago. This study highlight the power of ancient genomics with the isolated population to provide new insights into complex history in East Eurasia.

    From the Discussion section of the paper:
    These results fit the hypothesis that the Ainu and the Jomon share the common ancestor:
    the present-day mainland Japanese are the hybrid between the Jomon and migrants from the East
    Eurasian continent
    , and the Hokkaido Ainu have less influence of genetic contribution of the
    migrants.
    Why cannot the scholars have an access to Yayoi samples?

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    it seems the old japonese Y-lineages C1a1 and D2 could be considered Jomon. In Japan C1a1 is about 5% and D2 is between 30 and 35% with an important cline of growing D from South-West to North. On the west coast D would be > 50% from Kanto (Tokyo plain), west coast were more Yayoi .

    Altogether anthropologists give a little Jomon part in the genetic pool of the Japonese population.

    Here they said for this IK002 Jomon 2500BPCentre Japon (mt N9b1) :"Assuming K=10 ancestral clusters, an ancestral component unique to IK002 appears which is the most prevalent in the Hokkaido Ainu (average 79.3%) . This component is also shared with present-day mainland Japonese as well as Ulchi (9.8% and 6.0% respectively).

    I don't know how much can you make confidence in this calculation method and if it shows the ancestry part really.
    This means The Jomon would be 10% ancestry of the Mainland Japonese while the Jomon Y-lineages sums to 35-40% of the population. I have difficulties to understand the scenario.
    Japon is mysterious often !

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