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Thread: U7 Frequencies From Some Sources (U7 ≥ .5%)

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Palisto View Post
    From the 29 Kurds from Georgia at Comas et al 2000 only 1 individual is U7, 1/29=3.44%.
    From the 15 Kurds from Iraq at Al-Zahery et al. 2012 1 individual is U7, 1/15=6.7%.
    From the 20 Kurds from Iran at Quintana-Murci et al. 2004 4 individuals are U7, 4/20=20%.
    It is way too early to say but it looks like a North-South gradient with the Zagros Mountains as a major peak area.
    All public and private data:
    http://kurdishdna.blogspot.com/2013/...a-data-ix.html
    From the 98 Kurds 7 individuals are U7, 7/98=7%.
    Thank you very much for the additional data. However, I was not incorrect in arriving at 6.9% (7/102) for Kurds.

    The data was taken from Al-Zahery et al.

    Al-Zahery cites: Comas D, Calafel F, Bendukidze N, Fañanás L, Bertranpetit J: Georgian and Kurd mtDNA sequence analysis shows a lack of correlation between languages and female genetic lineages. Am J Phys Anthropol 2000, 112:5-16.

  2. #12
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    Palisto referred to the Zagros Mountains. For those unfamiliar with the area:


  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humanist View Post
    Thank you very much for the additional data. However, I was not incorrect in arriving at 6.9% (7/102) for Kurds.

    The data was taken from Al-Zahery et al.

    Al-Zahery cites: Comas D, Calafel F, Bendukidze N, Fañanás L, Bertranpetit J: Georgian and Kurd mtDNA sequence analysis shows a lack of correlation between languages and female genetic lineages. Am J Phys Anthropol 2000, 112:5-16.
    Thanks for letting me know your source. I don't know why Al-Zahery wrote 7/102; in the original publication from Comas et al 2000 only 29 Kurds were tested, not 102 Kurds. From the paper Comas et al., 2000:
    "Blood samples from 45 Georgians and 29 Kurds were collected in rural areas around the city of Tbilisi, Georgia. All donors were healthy, unrelated individuals with autoch- thonous ancestry. Appropriate informed consent was obtained from all participants in this study."

    See attached the raw data from Comas et al 2000 (Figure 1)
    Comas et al Figure1.jpg
    Only "KUR22" is U7 with (CRS + A16309G, A16318T = U7), so 1/29=3.44%

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  5. #14
    So where do we think this lineage originated?

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    Quote Originally Posted by newtoboard View Post
    So where do we think this lineage originated?
    A comprehensive study of U7 is a desideratum. We do not know much about it, apart from frequencies in some of the world's populations, and the fact that it has been observed in some aDNA samples.

    Based on the (incomplete) record to date, however, I suppose the "Central Asian Corridor" is not a bad bet. See "U7 in Rostov Scythians."

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  8. #16
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    Iranian data from Farjadian et al.;

    Code:
    Arab (n=45) 4.4%
    Armenian (n=52) -
    Azeri (n=53) 9.4%
    Balochi (n=61) 8.1%
    Gilaki (n=23) -
    Jewish (n=56) 14.5%
    Kurdish (n=55) 7.3%
    Luri 1 (n=30) 10%
    Luri 2 (n=29) 34.5%
    Mazandarani (n=51) 2%
    Persian (n=58) 10.3%
    Qashqai (n=46) 6.5%
    Qeshm (n=55) -
    Turkmen (n=55) 7.3%
    Zoroastrian (n=49) 2%
    Jewish and Luri 2 percentages look like genetic drift has taken place, but some data on mtDNA diversity would've aided this proposition.

    There do not appear to be any clear differences by way of language (central Persian ~10% vs. Azeri from NW ~9%), geography (Qeshm, Gilakis and Armenians at 0%) or religion (presumably Muslim Arab at 4.4%, Zoroastrian Persian at 2%).

    U7 in Iran can be said to have a patchy distribution likely reflecting complex movements in both time and space across the plateau.

    As a footnote, The numerical magnitude of this data does no favours to the proposition that the Zagros mountains are a significant hotspot for mtDNA U7, aside from the Luri 2 sample which exceeds 30%. Otherwise, we'd expect the Iranian Azeris and Kurds to have impressive values, which they don't appear to have.

    Nevertheless, the average based on approx. 680 samples is 7.8%. This isn't far off from the Kurdish average Palisto posted, hinting that mtDNA U7 in both populations might have a similar significance. Same goes to the Sindhi and Assyrians.

    Come to think of it, perhaps the consistent 6-8% range between Assyrians, Kurds, Iranians (multi-ethnic) and certain Pakistani groups points to an eastern Neolithic phenomena? Thoughts on this gentlemen?

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  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMXX View Post
    There do not appear to be any clear differences by way of language (central Persian ~10% vs. Azeri from NW ~9%), geography (Qeshm, Gilakis and Armenians at 0%) or religion (presumably Muslim Arab at 4.4%, Zoroastrian Persian at 2%).

    U7 in Iran can be said to have a patchy distribution likely reflecting complex movements in both time and space across the plateau.
    Good observation. Looking at the current (pred.) languages of the top 10 populations from the original post:

    Code:
    10.5%	Brahui	Dravidian
    9.8%	IraniJw	Semitic
    8.7%	Sindhi	Indo-Iranian
    8.2%	Iran	Indo-Iranian
    8.0%	Assyr 	Semitic
    6.9%	Kurds	Indo-Iranian
    6.8%	Burusho	-Isolate-
    5.2%	AzeriJw	Turkic
    4.8%	MrshAB	Semitic (Arabic)
    4.3%    Hazara  Indo-Iranian
    Last edited by Humanist; 07-18-2013 at 09:48 PM.

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  12. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humanist View Post
    Good observation. Looking at the current (pred.) languages of the top 10 populations from the original post:

    Code:
    10.5%	Brahui	Dravidian
    9.8%	IraniJw	Semitic
    8.7%	Sindhi	Indo-Iranian
    8.2%	Iran	Indo-Iranian
    8.0%	Assyr 	Semitic
    6.9%	Kurds	Indo-Iranian
    6.8%	Burusho	-Isolate-
    5.2%	AzeriJw	Turkic
    4.8%	MrshAB	Semitic (Arabic)
    4.3%    Hazara  Indo-Iranian
    Indeed; a similar trend can be inferred in the Caucasus. There is no linguistic or geographical pattern to its' distribution.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scyth View Post
    Indo-Iranian?

    You might as well go with Indo-European and Afro-Asiatic next time
    Can you explain why Indo-European is a better label than Indo-Iranian here?

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  14. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by DMXX View Post
    Can you explain why Indo-European is a better label than Indo-Iranian here?
    I think it is correct to use here Indo-Iranian as a branch of Indo-European and Semitic as a branch of Afro-Asiatic.

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  16. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMXX View Post
    As a footnote, The numerical magnitude of this data does no favours to the proposition that the Zagros mountains are a significant hotspot for mtDNA U7, aside from the Luri 2 sample which exceeds 30%. Otherwise, we'd expect the Iranian Azeris and Kurds to have impressive values, which they don't appear to have.
    I found another paper from Derenko et al., 2007:
    http://kurdishdna.blogspot.com/2013/...sians-and.html

    From the 25 Kurds from Iran in Derenko et al., 2007 4 individuals are U7, 4/25=16%.
    From the 20 Kurds from Iran in Quintana-Murci et al. 2004 4 individuals are U7, 4/20=20%.
    From the 55 Kurds from Iran in Farajan et al., 4 individuals are U7, 4/55=7%.

    All the Iranian Kurds together: 12 individuals are U7, 12/105=11.4%.

    All Kurds together, including Farajian et al. and Derenko et al. to my data (N=178): 15 individuals are U7, 15/178=8.4%.

    Do you a link/PMID for Farajan et al.,?

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