Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 90

Thread: U7 Frequencies From Some Sources (U7 ≥ .5%)

  1. #21
    Administrator
    Posts
    3,253
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    R2a*-M124 (L295-)
    mtDNA
    D4j5*

    England
    Quote Originally Posted by Palisto View Post
    Do you a link/PMID for Farajan et al.,?
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21912140

    Note I mistyped the lead author's name in the earlier post (it is in fact Farjadian).

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to DMXX For This Useful Post:

     Palisto (07-19-2013)

  3. #22
    Administrator
    Posts
    3,253
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    R2a*-M124 (L295-)
    mtDNA
    D4j5*

    England
    Quote Originally Posted by Scyth View Post
    That's not the point I was trying to make. I think Iranic and Indic are the most correct terms.
    I understand there is a disagreement with the terms, but what is the source of this disagreement? I am curious to learn how fine-tuning the linguistic labels will enrich our understanding of mtDNA U7's significance in the region.

    There were also other flaws with Humanist's post. Azeri and Iranian Jews are Iranic speakers.
    This is true, the Jewish populations of Iran speak their own dialects depending on where they are in the country. I've been told they have many Hebrew loanwords, but are still considered variants of Persian. Fairly analogous to Hazaragi (structurally Persian but with heavy Altaic vocabulary).

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to DMXX For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (03-26-2016)

  5. #23
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,444
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    G1a1b1 (GG167/GG200)
    mtDNA
    HV4a2a

    Shen et al. 2004

    N=16
    Samaritan U7 = 31.3%

    This is an old paper, so I am not sure if this bit is still current:

    Five Samaritans fall into haplogroup U7, which ranges from India to the Middle East [Richards et al., 2000; Kivisild et al., 2003], but is rare or absent elsewhere. These five Samaritan U7 mitochondria share a transition at np 15511, which is not found among other Middle Eastern sequences.
    It would be great to have an updated analysis of the Samaritan U7 haplotype, and West Asian U7.

    Wikipedia

    Jewish tradition maintains a different origin for the Samaritans. The Talmud accounts for a people called "Cuthim" on a number of occasions, mentioning their arrival by the hands of the Assyrians. According to 2 Kings[21] and Josephus[22] the people of Israel were removed by the king of the Assyrians (Sargon II)[23] to Halah, to Gozan on the Khabur River and to the towns of the Medes. The king of the Assyrians then brought people from Babylon, Cuthah, Avah, Emath, and Sepharvaim to place in Samaria. Because God sent lions among them to kill them, the king of the Assyrians sent one of the priests from Bethel to teach the new settlers about God's ordinances. The eventual result was that the new settlers worshipped both the God of the land and their own gods from the countries from which they came.
    Last edited by Humanist; 10-19-2013 at 09:56 PM.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Humanist For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (03-26-2016)

  7. #24
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,444
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    G1a1b1 (GG167/GG200)
    mtDNA
    HV4a2a

    Quote Originally Posted by Humanist View Post
    U7 Frequencies From Some Sources (U7 ≥ .5%)
    Code:
    31.3%	Samaritan	Shen et al. 2004
    10.5%	Brahui	Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
    9.8%	IraniJw	Behar et al. 2008
    8.7%	Sindhi	Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
    8.2%	Iran	Quintana-Murci et al. 2004, Metspalu et al. 2004
    8.0%	Assyr 	Public and Private Data
    6.9%	Kurds	Comas et al. 2000
    6.8%	Burusho	Quintana-Murci et al. 2004 
    5.2%	AzeriJw	Behar et al. 2008
    4.8%	MrshAB	Al-Zahery et al. 2011 (Iraqi Marsh Arab)
    4.3%	Hazara	Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
    3.4%	Bedouin	Behar et al. 2008
    3.0%	Jordan	Behar et al. 2010
    3.0%	Makrani	Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
    3.0%	Uzbek	Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
    2.8%	Iraqi	Al-Zahery et al. 2011
    2.6%	Balochi	Quintana-Murci et al. 2004
    2.5%	Tuscan	Pala et al. 2009
    2.2%	IraqiJw	Behar et al. 2008
    2.1%	Uygur	Yao et al. 2004
    2.1%	Bulgaria	Richards et al. 2000
    1.6%	Egypt	Behar et al. 2010
    1.6%	Turkey	Tambets et al. 2000
    1.4%	AshkJw	Behar et al. 2006
    1.2%	LibyaJw	Behar et al. 2008
    1.2%	UAE	Alshamali et al. 2008
    1.1%	S.India	Behar et al. 2010
    1.1%	Cyprus	Behar et al. 2010
    1.0%	Georgia	Quintana-Murci et al. 2004, Comas et al. 2000
    0.9%	Saudi	Abu-Amero et al. 2007
    0.9%	Syria	Behar et al. 2010
    0.8%	Yemen	Kivisild et al. 2004
    0.7%	Armeni	Richards et al. 2000
    0.6%	Romania	Behar et al. 2010
    0.5%	Russia	Malyarchuk et al. 2002
    0.5%	Adyghe	Richards et al. 2000

    I do not know the specifics for most of these populations, but a recent Italian (or Sicilian) U7 FGS came back as a HVR1/HVR2 match with the lone Assyrian U7 tested at FTDNA.
    U7 In Modern European Populations (from above)
    Code:
    2.5%	Tuscan	Pala et al. 2009
    2.1%	Bulgaria	Richards et al. 2000
    1.1%	Cyprus	Behar et al. 2010
    0.6%	Romania	Behar et al. 2010
    0.5%	Russia	Malyarchuk et al. 2002

    Wikipedia notes, regarding U7 and the modern European continent:

    Many European populations lack Haplogroup U7...However, it was present in Northern Europe before the Middle Ages, and it was carried by a wealthy woman, perhaps of their Royal Clan, buried in the Viking Oseberg ship in Norway.
    From the Wikipedia article on the Oseberg ship:

    The Oseberg ship (Viking Ship Museum, Norway)




    The so-called "Buddha bucket" (Buddha-bøtte), a brass and cloisonné enamel ornament of a bucket (pail) handle in the shape of a figure sitting with crossed legs.


    Another case of U7 in the north:

    mtDNA analysis of human remains from an early Danish Christian cemetery.

    Rudbeck et al.

    Abstract

    One of Denmark's earliest Christian cemeteries is Kongemarken, dating to around AD 1000-1250. A feature of early Scandinavian Christian cemeteries is sex segregation, with females buried on the northern sides and males on the southern sides. However, such separation was never complete; in the few early Christian cemeteries excavated in Scandinavia, there were always a few males placed on the north side, and some females on the south side. At Kongemarken, several males with juxtaposed females were found on the north side of the cemetery. Thus, to evaluate possible kinship relationships, and more general questions of population affinity, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA extracted from nine individuals excavated in two different areas within the cemetery: one male and four females from Area 1, and one male and three females from Area 2. Using stringent laboratory protocols, each individual was unequivocally assigned to a mitochondrial haplogroup. A surprising amount of haplogroup diversity was observed (Area 1: 1 U7 (male), 1 H, 1 I, 1 J, and 1 T2; Area 2: 2 H, 1 I, and 1 T, with one H being male); even the three subjects of haplogroup H were of different subtypes. This indicates that no subjects within each area were maternally related. The observed haplogroup, U7, while common in India and in western Siberian tribes, was not previously observed among present-day ethnic Scandinavians, and haplogroup I is rare (2%) in Scandinavia. These observations suggest that the individuals living in the Roskilde region 1,000 years ago were not all members of a tightly knit local population and comprised individuals with genetic links with populations that were from much farther away.

    And, there is also this study:

    An ancient DNA perspective on the Iron Age “princely burials” from Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany.

    Lee et al.

    During the Iron Age in Europe, fundamental social principles such as age, gender, status, and kinship were thought to have played an important role in the social structure of Late Hallstatt and Early Latene societies. In order to address the question of kinship relations represented in the Iron Age “princely burials” that are characterized by their rich material culture, we carried out genetic analysis of individuals associated with the Late Hallstatt culture from Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany. Bone specimens of thirty-eight skeletal remains were collected from five sites including Asperg Grafenbuhl, Muhlacker Heidenwaldle, Hirschlanden, Ludwigsburg, and Schodeingen. Specimens were subjected to DNA extraction and amplification under strict criteria for ancient DNA analysis. We successfully obtained mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from seventeen individuals that showed different haplotypes, which were assigned to nine haplogroups including haplogroups H, I, K, U5, U7, W, and X2b. Despite the lack of information from nuclear DNA to infer familial relations, information from the mtDNA suggests an intriguing genetic composition of the Late Hallstatt burials. In particular, twelve distinct haplotypes from Asperg Grafenbuhl suggest a heterogeneous composition of maternal lineages represented in the “princely burials”. The results from this study provide clues to the social structure reflected in the burial patterns of the Late Hallstatt culture and implications on the genetic landscape during the Iron Age in Europe.
    Last edited by Humanist; 12-21-2013 at 06:51 AM.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Humanist For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (03-26-2016)

  9. #25
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,444
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    G1a1b1 (GG167/GG200)
    mtDNA
    HV4a2a

    Complete Mitochondrial DNA Diversity in Iranians

    Derenko et al. (2013)

    For U7, the initial expansion seems to more or less coincide with the ~16–22 kya estimated coalescent age for the entire U7 and ~19–21 kya for the most diverse and prevalent sub-clade U7a. This expansion appears to have continued at a somewhat equal rate, gradually slowing down, until the curve even drops slightly, and eventually a new expansion phase takes place around ~4 kya.

  10. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Humanist For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (03-26-2016),  DMXX (01-28-2014),  Sein (01-15-2014)

  11. #26
    I am Azerbaijani and this is my maternal haplogroup. (U7a3). U7's heat map;


  12. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Imadaddin Nasimi For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (03-26-2016),  DMXX (12-28-2013),  Humanist (01-15-2014),  Mehrdad (08-13-2014),  Sein (01-15-2014)

  13. #27
    Registered Users
    Posts
    413
    Sex
    Location
    U.S
    Nationality
    Indian
    Y-DNA
    Z30522+
    mtDNA
    C4a1a (T195C!)

    India United States of America Chola Empire India Maratha Empire
    Quote Originally Posted by Imadaddin Nasimi View Post
    I am Azerbaijani and this is my maternal haplogroup. (U7a3). U7's heat map;
    interesting....do you have FMS results?
    which samples do you match with on Gail's FTDNA U7 project?
    Last edited by soulblighter; 12-28-2013 at 02:28 PM.
    Paternal YDNA: G-P303+ -> G-Z30522+
    Paternal mtDNA: U7a3b1
    Maternal YDNA: R-Z2123+ -> R-YP526+
    Maternal mtDNA: C4a1 (T195C!)

  14. #28
    Registered Users
    Posts
    924
    Sex
    Omitted
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    mtDNA
    U5a2a1

    Here is a summary of the 29 U7b samples in GenBank and the U7 project.

    The 29 samples include 15 different U7b lineages. U7b1 includes 9 closely related samples from the Isle of Elba published in a study by Brisighelli et al. There is a group of 4 closely related samples from Finland, and another group of 4 somewhat closely related samples from Germany, Switzerland and Spain, with the Spanish person being more distant from the other 3.

    The 12 other U7b lineages are each represented by a single sample. Four of these are from Denmark (this might simply indicate high sampling frequency in Denmark, based on the 1000 samples in the recent Li et al study, which included 3 new U7b samples) and one each from Pakistan, Austria, Croatia, Lithuania, Ukraine, Russia, Iran and one person of unknown ancestry, probably European. My age estimate for U7b is about 9500 years, slightly younger than the estimate from Behar et al.

    The lack of samples in the UK and Ireland (where we have very high sample density) is interesting, and this might indicate a "recent" migration from the east sometime in the last several thousand years. Whenever I see a distribution similar to this, which includes samples from Iran and Pakistan, it makes wonder if this group originated in population of proto-Indo Europeans. The age estimate is older than the age of proto-Indo European, and perhaps that is a results of pre-existing diversity of U7b in that population.

    However, the high frequency of U7 based on HVR results in Pakistan and Iran might suggest a more recent origin in that region. The Derenko et al study had only 1 U7b from Iran, and 18 U7a, so we might need more full sequence samples to sort out U7a and U7b in southwest Asia, but Iran seems to be mostly U7a.
    Last edited by GailT; 01-15-2014 at 04:51 AM.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to GailT For This Useful Post:

     Humanist (01-15-2014)

  16. #29
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,444
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    G1a1b1 (GG167/GG200)
    mtDNA
    HV4a2a

    Jean M posted a link to a study on Sri Lankan populations here.

    The study: Mitochondrial DNA history of Sri Lankan ethnic people: their relations within the island and with the Indian subcontinental populations

    Ranaweera et al.

    One of the groups sampled were the Vedda.

    Their U7 frequency was 13%.


    Wikipedia

    Vedda chief Uruwarige Wannila Aththo.


  17. The Following User Says Thank You to Humanist For This Useful Post:

     ZephyrousMandaru (01-27-2014)

  18. #30
    They are of course U7a, and we did know that. When I spoke of an European U7 I spoke of U7b, in fact no U7b has been found there:

    "Haplogroup U was mostly found in Vedda (29.33%) and Up-country Sinhalese (23.33%), with highest contribution from sub-haplogroups U1a’c (12 and 5%, respectively) and U7a (13.33 and 11.67%, respectively)" (p. 32).

    There have been found 2 U7, which demonstrate that the origin of the haplogroup is there, even though they shall be demonstrated, having they tested only HVRI and part of HVRII.

Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •