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Thread: Irish DNA Atlas, Preliminary Results

  1. #1631
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    Ireland Scotland Wales England Germany Switzerland
    Does anyone know if the Irish DNA Atlas people are going to do any projects or have any joint projects with anybody else anytime soon? I really liked the study published about a year ago that included Scotland and the Isle of Man.

    Kind Regards
    Fridurich

  2. #1632
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    Ireland European Union
    Update on the Irish DNA Atlas
    Dr. Ed. Gilbert
    Genetic Landscape between Ireland and Scotland

    In our 2017 research paper, the Irish DNA Atlas revealed the fine-scale details of the genetic landscape of Ireland, demonstrating subtle regional differences in Irish genetics which were reflective of historical boundaries. Furthermore, we demonstrated considerable ‘British’ ancestry in the north-east of Ulster, but due to the limits of our British reference samples were unable to decisively differentiate between a northern English affinity or a southern Scottish affinity. Working with researchers from the University of Edinburgh and other Scottish academic institutions, we were able to apply the research methodology developed at RCSI to Scottish DNA samples with regional genealogies akin to the Irish DNA Atlas. This allowed us to investigate the genetic landscape of Scotland and its Isles, and Ireland together1 (please find attached to this email). We showed that with additional Scottish references, Irish individuals with high ‘British’ ancestry within the north-east of Ulster show more affinity to references from the south-west of Scotland, not with the north of England (see below). This work also demonstrated the genetic distinctiveness of the various isles around Scotland to its west and the north-east. The results from these Scottish Isles highlights the need for further, focussed, recruitment from the Irish Isles – something that the Irish DNA Atlas is keen to pursue. Lastly the Irish DNA Atlas helped show that, DNA extracted from the remains of the first Gaelic settlers of Iceland, when compared to modern individuals from across Britain and Ireland, showed most affinity to inhabitants of the Scottish western Isles and/or the north-west of Ireland in Donegal.

    Legend (above)

    Genetic clustering of 2,544 Irish and British individuals based on their genetic affinities.

    (A) A tree showing 43 groups, or ‘clusters’, of individuals grouped by genetic affinity. The tree shows each cluster grouped with other similar clusters on shared branches.

    ( A map of Ireland and Britain, with each point showing one individual placed at the average geographic location of their recent ancestors. Each point is colour and shape coded according to clusters listed in (A).


    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1jwx...w?usp=drivesdk


    The update letter was issued to participants in the Irish DNA Atlas study on 9th November. Here is the rest of the update.

    Doctoral Defence

    In addition to continuing to provide research materials for new scientific publications, the Irish DNA Atlas has provided the basis of doctoral thesis research at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. In June 2019 Edmund Gilbert successfully defended his research thesis, largely based on his work with the Irish DNA Atlas. As well as this, your participation in the Irish DNA Atlas has also provided the basis for other post- and under-graduate research projects and will continue to provide a resource for future research, study, and education.

    Future Research

    The Irish DNA Atlas has helped shape our understanding of the current, common, genetic landscape of Ireland. With this research established we are now progressing to further research questions. The first is investigating rare genetic variation. Up until now the Irish DNA Atlas has studied common variation within Ireland. These mutations are ‘common’ in that they are present in more than 5% of the individuals studied. In conjunction with the analyses we have performed, this common genetic variation has been invaluable in understanding the impact of history on the Irish genetic landscape (which we have reported in the first Irish DNA Atlas paper2). However, by its frequent nature, common mutations are generally shared between broad groups of individuals, i.e. across continents, and across Ireland and Britain. It is only by studying hundreds of thousands of such genetic variants together that we can infer different genetic regions. In contrast, rare variation is only found in limited number of individuals because rarer mutations are typically more recent in age, and therefore act as footprints of recent genetic processes, such as those specific to Ireland. Furthermore, rare genetic mutations tend to be more geographically localised, thus specific to specific regions. Rare variation is therefore more informative about recent and local genetic differences and would reveal novel insights into the genetic landscape of Ireland.

    Working with collaborators at deCode Genetics, experts of this type of variation in Iceland, we aim to study geographically localised rare genetic variation across the island of Ireland. Furthermore, analysis of rare variation shared between Ireland and neighbouring populations may inform on recent subtle migratory links. This rare variation will be generated across the genome, with high resolution genetic data also generated on Irish DNA Atlas Y-chromosomes and mitochondrial genomes, which we hope will be of interest. Lastly, whilst we have an accurate picture of the fine-scale genetic landscape of Ireland, we have a less clear picture of the demographic history of Ireland, i.e. how large was the population through different periods and if there is evidence of population contraction. These demographic characteristics impact a population’s genetic variation; therefore, this research will further our understanding of both history and disease risk within Ireland.





    As the project evolves, and when new data and studies from the Irish DNA Atlas are reported, we will continue to keep you updated. In addition to our work with deCODE Genetics, the Irish DNA Atlas is also collaborating with academic research institutions in Ireland, providing a valuable reference of Irish genetics. Currently the project is working with researchers at Letterkenny Institute of Technology, and Trinity College Dublin.

    Furthermore, we wish to again thank you for your ongoing participation and hope you have found this newsletter of interest. Please note that you are free to withdraw from this study at any point, without giving a reason. Please contact us below if you wish to do so and we will destroy your sample and associated data. If you have questions about the study or the points discussed above, please do not hesitate to contact either Prof. Gianpiero Cavalleri or myself.

    This research has been funded through a Career Development Award from Science Foundation Ireland. RCSI is ranked among the top 250 (top 2%) of universities worldwide in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings (2018) and its research is ranked first in Ireland for citations. It is an international not-for-profit health sciences institution, with its headquarters in Dublin, focused on education and research to drive improvements in human health worldwide. RCSI is a signatory of the Athena SWAN Charter.
    Gerard Corcoran
    R1b-DF21-S5456-S6166, H1C1

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  4. #1633
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    Ed did a talk about some of the updates about 7 months ago

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKXIiyQJTJY

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  6. #1634
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    A lot of fuss is made about the English contribution to the gene pool here in Northern Ireland, however, I am not seeing much evidence of it in my ancestrydna matches.

    In my Northern Irish matches most people have no English Dna whatsoever, the highest I can find is 7%.

    Given the largely English Plantation in Fermanagh, I wonder if a Protestant from Fermanagh would score a high English percentage?
    Last edited by Nqp15hhu; 04-12-2021 at 01:50 AM.

  7. #1635
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    Just found this thread from another Y-DNA thread.

    I've just been put into a new marker called FGC15275 under R-Y64389 which falls heavily under the Irish names of Durkin, Mulvihill, O Connel and a few others. Problem for me, I dont know my paternal line as I'm adopted but know my birth mom. Smith has also now joined this group of surnames. Was wonder if anyone could take a look at my Big Y 700 data and give a steer? I'm happy to pay for anyone's time in this regard if needed.

    I'm the unknown 776917 kit here https://www.ytree.net/DisplayTree.php?blockID=626

    Thanks

  8. #1636
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dubhthach View Post
    Well I imagine that like way we have a mix of L21 (eg. we have men with obvious post-1169 surnames that are L21+) it's probably the same case with DF27. I will admit I'm not familiar with DF17 and it's current status but when I filter in the Ireland project for men who have a DF17+ result I see a mix for example:

    Joyce -- Welsh origin surname in an Irish context

    Durkin:

    Mulvihill:

    What's interesting is that if the Mulvhill family were indeed members of Síol Muireadhaigh (of Uí Briúin Aí of the Connachta) ye'd expect a M222+ and probably A259+ result. So there might be more than one family there. Of course given that Durkin is also a North Connacht surname it's interesting seeing DF17+ show up in it as well.

    It's interesting actually seeing the spilt between those names and Joyce here:
    http://www.ytree.net/DisplayTree.php...624&star=false

    That's fairly old branching point.
    Hi, just posted above, these names seem to be very common in my Y-DNA, was hoping you might take a look and comment on my Y-DNA placement?

    https://www.ytree.net/DisplayTree.php?blockID=626

    I'm Unknown / Kit 776917.

    Thank you.

  9. #1637
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    For info, my baptism cert marks my father's name as Chris Christian however we can find no trace of such a man. We also have an example of a Sullivan surname person, marrying a protestant female and changing their surname to Christian. My Y-DNA also doesnt match Christian from Ilse of Man, a contingent went to South Africa but no match.

  10. #1638
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    What denomination and country is that baptism certificate from?

  11. #1639
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaz View Post
    Hi, just posted above, these names seem to be very common in my Y-DNA, was hoping you might take a look and comment on my Y-DNA placement?

    https://www.ytree.net/DisplayTree.php?blockID=626

    I'm Unknown / Kit 776917.

    Thank you.
    Your terminal SNP (Y64389) has an estimated TMRCA of 340 BC. That makes it difficult to say anything with any degree of certainty. A lot of time has passed since then, and a lot has happened vis a vis population movements.

    Having said that, the fact that your fellow Y64389 is of Irish extraction, and given that the SNP immediately above (R-FGC14114, with a TMRCA of 710 BC) has three matches from Irish background who also have clearly Irish surnames, makes me think that you can be reasonably confident that your father was also of Irish extraction. I'm not speaking of certitude, mind you, just of probability.

    As hard as it is, sometimes-- and it is hard-- the kinds of answers you're looking for often come only with patience and time. Eventually the right person will do a test and provide you the match you're looking for.
    Last edited by David Mc; 05-18-2021 at 07:00 AM.

  12. #1640
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    Quote Originally Posted by J1 DYS388=13 View Post
    What denomination and country is that baptism certificate from?
    South Africa.

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