Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Kurdish, Iranian and Tajik Y-DNA Results

  1. #1
    Registered Users
    Posts
    4,722
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    R2a*-M124 (L295-)
    mtDNA (M)
    D4j5*

    Kurdish, Iranian and Tajik Y-DNA Results

    Y-chromosome variation in Tajiks and Iranians
    Malyarchuk B, Derenko M, Wozniak M, Grzybowski T.

    Link: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs...60.2012.747628

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to characterize Y-chromosome diversity in Tajiks from Tajikistan and in Persians and Kurds from Iran.

    Method: Y-chromosome haplotypes were identified in 40 Tajiks, 77 Persians and 25 Kurds, using 12 short tandem repeats (STR) and 18 binary markers.

    Results: High genetic diversity was observed in the populations studied. Six of 12 haplogroups were common in Persians, Kurds and Tajiks, but only three haplogroups (G-M201, J-12f2 and L-M20) were the most frequent in all populations, comprising together 60% of the Y-chromosomes in the pooled data set. Analysis of genetic distances between Y-STR haplotypes revealed that the Kurds showed a great distance to the Iranian-speaking populations of Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan. The presence of Indian-specific haplogroups L-M20, H1-M52 and R2a-M124 in both Tajik samples from Afghanistan and Tajikistan demonstrates an apparent genetic affinity between Tajiks from these two regions.

    Conclusions: Despite the marked similarities between Y-chromosome gene pools of Iranian-speaking populations, there are differences between them, defined by many factors, including geographic and linguistic relationships.



    First impressions;
    • Sample sizes are a drawback. I tend towards a figure of at least ~50 for cities and ~100 for representative ethnicities or nationalities.
    • Inadequate Y-STR profiling. The latest papers tend towards at least 17 (e.g. the recent paper on South India). Thus, manual haplotype comparisons are made less effective.
    • Inadequate Y-SNP profiling. One does not need to look into the methodology to anticipate significant markers (such as R1b1a1-M73) when only R1b-M343 is listed.
    • Due to the small sample sizes, detailed conclusions beyond what current scientific literature has already shown us cannot be made. For instance, we see a west-east frequency gradient between Y-DNA Haplogroups E, G, J & T vs. H, L, Q, R1a1 & R2a.
    • Haplogroup I makes an appearance once more in the West Iranic-speaking world. Frustratingly, the lack of resolution beyond the M170 marker once more prevents us from learning anything about its' presence there.
    • The Kurdish results appear the most anomalous (i.e. Y-DNA C, J, R1a1) no doubt confounded by the small sample size. Kurds from Iran were shown to be fairly similar to Azeri Iranians in Grugni et al., who in turn are closest to other Iranians (as per a recent paper from Tabriz, the largest Azeri Iranian city). One would therefore expect more congruency between the Kurds and Persians here.

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to DMXX For This Useful Post:

     Humanist (12-20-2012),  jesus (12-28-2015),  NK19191 (03-03-2013)

  3. #2
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,285
    Sex
    Location
    Canada
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Euro/Near East
    Nationality
    Canadian
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1a-YP4516/YP4807*
    mtDNA (M)
    H11a2a3

    Canada Franco-Manitoban European Union Ottoman Empire Russia Imperial United States Grand Union
    Did they make an attempt to control for close/known relatives in the Kurdish sample? I'm guessing possibly not from the lower haplotype diversity.

    We have a whole tonne of Kyrgyz guys in the R1a1a and Subclades Project that are probably all close paternal relatives: you might call this a "mountain founder effect." I think you see the same thing in the Caucasus and elsewhere.
     

    Other ancestral Y lines:

    E1b-M81 Ukraine (Ashkenazi)
    E1b-V13 England
    I1-M253 Ireland
    I2-M423 Ukraine
    R1a-L176.1 Scotland
    R1b-L584 Syria/Turkey (Sephardi)
    R1b-L20 Ireland
    R1b-L21 (1)England; (2)Wales?>Connecticut
    R1b-L48 England
    R1b-P312 Scotland
    R1b-FGC32576 Ireland

    Other ancestral mtDNA lines:

    H1b2a Ukraine (Ashkenazi)
    H6a1a3 Ukraine
    K1a9 Belarus (Ashkenazi)
    K1c2 Ireland
    V7a Ukraine

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to AJL For This Useful Post:

     DMXX (12-20-2012),  NK19191 (04-25-2013)

  5. #3
    Registered Users
    Posts
    4,722
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    R2a*-M124 (L295-)
    mtDNA (M)
    D4j5*

    Quote Originally Posted by AJL View Post
    Did they make an attempt to control for close/known relatives in the Kurdish sample? I'm guessing possibly not from the lower haplotype diversity.

    We have a whole tonne of Kyrgyz guys in the R1a1a and Subclades Project that are probably all close paternal relatives: you might call this a "mountain founder effect." I think you see the same thing in the Caucasus and elsewhere.
    I am blocked by a paywall as my institutional access doesn't cover it. There's nothing in the Abstract to indicate that. That being said, you will note that the STR haplotype count for each population is very roughly equivalent across the board relative to the sample sizes. So, it looks like the Kurds are slightly less diverse only when compared to the Persians and Tajiks. No doubt the diversity perception would change if more individuals were tested and other populations included (i.e. Iraqi Arabs, Anatolian Turks, Armenians).

    You definitely see the same thing in Afghan Pashtun R1a1a. It's also observed in a specific subclade of Ossetian G2a. Could we have just coined some genetic genealogy lingo with the "mountain founder"/"mountaineer" effect?

  6. #4
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,285
    Sex
    Location
    Canada
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Euro/Near East
    Nationality
    Canadian
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1a-YP4516/YP4807*
    mtDNA (M)
    H11a2a3

    Canada Franco-Manitoban European Union Ottoman Empire Russia Imperial United States Grand Union
    Quote Originally Posted by DMXX View Post
    I am blocked by a paywall as my institutional access doesn't cover it. There's nothing in the Abstract to indicate that. That being said, you will note that the STR haplotype count for each population is very roughly equivalent across the board relative to the sample sizes. So, it looks like the Kurds are slightly less diverse only when compared to the Persians and Tajiks. No doubt the diversity perception would change if more individuals were tested and other populations included (i.e. Iraqi Arabs, Anatolian Turks, Armenians).

    You definitely see the same thing in Afghan Pashtun R1a1a. It's also observed in a specific subclade of Ossetian G2a. Could we have just coined some genetic genealogy lingo with the "mountain founder"/"mountaineer" effect?
    Hm, maybe we could write this up: I'm trying to think of some sort of pun with "allele peak" for the title.
     

    Other ancestral Y lines:

    E1b-M81 Ukraine (Ashkenazi)
    E1b-V13 England
    I1-M253 Ireland
    I2-M423 Ukraine
    R1a-L176.1 Scotland
    R1b-L584 Syria/Turkey (Sephardi)
    R1b-L20 Ireland
    R1b-L21 (1)England; (2)Wales?>Connecticut
    R1b-L48 England
    R1b-P312 Scotland
    R1b-FGC32576 Ireland

    Other ancestral mtDNA lines:

    H1b2a Ukraine (Ashkenazi)
    H6a1a3 Ukraine
    K1a9 Belarus (Ashkenazi)
    K1c2 Ireland
    V7a Ukraine

  7. #5
    Any theories on the ydna I?

  8. #6
    Registered Users
    Posts
    4,722
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    R2a*-M124 (L295-)
    mtDNA (M)
    D4j5*

    Quote Originally Posted by newtoboard View Post
    Any theories on the ydna I?
    I find it unlikely to be derived from Andronovo given it is absent in the Altai and further afield, but stranger things have happened in the world of genetics.

    My personal theories are that the Y-DNA I observed in Central Asia are that they made their way eastwards via the Persian empires. I have the Silk Road firmly in mind here. A comparison with Armenian, Anatolian Turkish and Kurdish Y-DNA I may prove useful here.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to DMXX For This Useful Post:

     NK19191 (04-25-2013)

  10. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by DMXX View Post
    I find it unlikely to be derived from Andronovo given it is absent in the Altai and further afield, but stranger things have happened in the world of genetics.

    My personal theories are that the Y-DNA I observed in Central Asia are that they made their way eastwards via the Persian empires. I have the Silk Road firmly in mind here. A comparison with Armenian, Anatolian Turkish and Kurdish Y-DNA I may prove useful here.
    Bottleneck in Andronovo?

    Even then the origins of Y-DNA I in Kurds and Armenians is mysterious. I get the feeling it entered their gene pools from Europe recently. Maybe with Cimmerian raids?

  11. #8
    My theory on I is from the Islamic Empire in Spain.

  12. #9
    Registered Users
    Posts
    304
    Sex

    There is I*-M170 among Nanai people in Gorin area of the Kabarovsk territory.

    THE NANAI CLAN SAMAR: THE STRUCTURE OF GENE POOL BASED ON Y-CHROMOSOME MARKERS

    Members of the Nanai clan Samar reside in the Gorin area of the Khabarovsk Territory. Their gene pool was studied using the SNP markers of the Y-chromosome. The major haplogroup, occurring in more than 83% of clansmen, is the northern Eurasian haplogroup N1c1-M178. Four other haplogroups are С*-М130, I*-M170, J2a1а-M47, and O2-P31. The most frequent haplogroup, N1c1-М178, indicates mostly Tungus origin of the Samar clan; other haplogroups detected by complete sequencing, such as the minor haplogroup C3*-M130, reveal ties with native populations of the Amur basin. Genetic distances and their multidimensional scaling demonstrate marked affinities of Samar clansmen with Yakuts, Khakas, and certain groups of Buryats, suggesting a common origin. Nanai of other regions are much further from the Samar.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...63011015001294

    Nanai people

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanai_people

    https://www.google.se/maps/place/Cha...31!4d135?hl=sv

Similar Threads

  1. Tajik Harappa Results?
    By SeverusGrape in forum Southern
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-05-2020, 12:46 AM
  2. My father's 24genetics results (Kurdish)
    By 95K1ller in forum 24Genetics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-18-2019, 05:05 AM
  3. 15% Northwestern Europe Kurdish DNA RESULTS
    By Scythian in forum MyHeritage
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-20-2019, 05:15 PM
  4. DNA results of my Kurdish father
    By Hawrę Mahmoud in forum Western
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 01-18-2019, 07:22 PM
  5. Any Pamiri Tajik kit numbers/results?
    By Leto in forum Autosomal (auDNA)
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-08-2017, 01:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •