Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 61 to 68 of 68

Thread: Do Southeast Asians have West Eurasian ancestry?

  1. #61
    Banned
    Posts
    494
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    1/2 Ilocano 1/2 Tagalog
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    C-M130
    mtDNA (M)
    B4a1a

    Philippines
    I think that plenty of non-Filipino SE-Asian ones do, but it more than likely wouldn't be of the Iberian type as more common in the Philippine Islands I think.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to shazou For This Useful Post:

     Kapisa (04-09-2021),  Tsakhur (09-02-2019)

  3. #62
    Registered Users
    Posts
    106
    Sex
    Location
    USA
    Ethnicity
    Filipino
    Nationality
    US
    Y-DNA (P)
    P_BY49600
    mtDNA (M)
    M7C1C3

    Dilawer Khan K5 Admixture GENEPLAZA Result

    83.1% East Eurasian
    9.0% West Eurasian
    7.3% South Eurasian
    0.4% Basal Eurasian/Africa
    0.3% Siberian American-Indian

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to ATjunior1 For This Useful Post:

     drobbah (04-08-2021),  Kapisa (04-09-2021),  Tsakhur (04-21-2021)

  5. #63
    Bronze Class Member
    Posts
    1,577
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    Assamese Tai and Kachari
    Nationality
    Indian
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1a1
    mtDNA (M)
    M13'46'61

    India China Myanmar Vietnam Laos
    Most Central Thai and Southern Thai have recent South Asian ancestry as per the latest report of the Thai Genomics project by Kutanan and company, https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1...294v1.full.pdf. It clearly shows that the spread of Tai Kadai languages in Thailand is a mix of demic diffusion and cultural diffusion with Northern Thailand being primarily demic diffusion, Northeast Thailand admixture and partly demic diffusion whereas Central Thailand and Southern Thailand is as a result of cultural diffusion as the non Chinese admixed people are ancestrally primarily Austroasiatic Monic. The Chinese Dai ancestry level is very low and equates with that of the Mon people. I seem to have more Chinese Dai related ancestry as evident from my Ethnogene results. I also look more Daiic as living in Thailand I am asked whether I am Thai Yai from Myanmar

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to jortita For This Useful Post:

     okarinaofsteiner (04-12-2021),  pgbk87 (04-12-2021),  Tsakhur (04-21-2021)

  7. #64
    Registered Users
    Posts
    95
    Sex
    Location
    None Ya
    Ethnicity
    Multi-ethnic Belizean
    Nationality
    Belizean/American
    Y-DNA (P)
    E1b1a1g1, Q1a3a1
    mtDNA (M)
    L2b2, L3e2b

    Belize CARICOM United States of America African Union Belize
    How does "negrito" or Onge-like admixture pop up in these calculators?

  8. #65
    Registered Users
    Posts
    272
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by pgbk87 View Post
    How does "negrito" or Onge-like admixture pop up in these calculators?
    That should be the South Eurasian component whenever found

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Max_H For This Useful Post:

     pgbk87 (04-18-2021)

  10. #66
    Registered Users
    Posts
    271
    Sex
    Omitted
    Ethnicity
    Mostly Chinese
    Nationality
    USA

    United States of America China
    https://www.gnxp.com/WordPress/2021/...ople/#comments


    This brings us to the question: how did Indian religious and cultural forms become entrenched on the coast of Vietnam 2,000 years ago?

    Two new preprints shed light on this, Reconstructing the human genetic history of mainland Southeast Asia: insights from genome-wide data from Thailand and Laos, and Indian genetic heritage in Southeast Asian populations. The second preprint is obviously more explicit.

    Figure 5 is clear:


    From the discussion:

    355 Our study revealed substantial South Asian admixture in various populations across Southeast Asia (~2-16% as inferred by qpAdm). We observed South Asian admixture in some populations (Cham, Ede, Giarai, Khmer, Kuy, Nyahkur, and Thai) for whom the admixture was not reported before. Most populations harboring South Asian admixture were heavily influenced by Indian culture in the past or are related to descendants of ancient Indianized states in Southeast Asia. In contrast, we failed to detect South Asian admixture in most “hill tribes” and in present-day hunter-gatherer groups from Thailand. Consequently, the spread of Indian influence in the region can be explained by extensive movement of people from India rather than by cultural diffusion only.
    The genetics suggest that the gene flow had to have happened between 0 and 1000 AD. This is basically prehistory in Southeast Asia, as most of our information comes from references in Chinese records. But the presence of R1a in particular across the region indicates to me serious elite migration from India during this period.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to okarinaofsteiner For This Useful Post:

     Tsakhur (08-02-2021)

  12. #67
    Registered Users
    Posts
    271
    Sex
    Omitted
    Ethnicity
    Mostly Chinese
    Nationality
    USA

    United States of America China
    Quote Originally Posted by okarinaofsteiner View Post
    Comments- re: why do SE Asians have so much R1a if their South Asian ancestry is relatively more AASI? I've noticed that the SE Asian samples in my private GEDmatch dataset tend to only score "South_Indian" (AASI-like + Hoabinhian) but not "South_Central_Asian" (ANI-like).

    I have a hard time imagining the source population for the South Asian in modern Southeast Asia was some South Indian tribal and/or low caste group. Part of this is because there’s very low levels of R1a among those groups (I believe less than 10%). But the major reason is just simple historiography – that any group which was able to expand overseas into the Southeast Asian littoral must have been high enough status to be able to mount major trading and/or military expeditions. Tribals and untouchables don’t have that.

    I wonder if part of the issue is Onge isn’t the best fit for the original negrito-type ancestry of these groups. The Andaman Islands were probably settled from Burma over a now-submerged land bridge, meaning they should be reasonably close fit for the ancestry in Burmese people, but they may have been more distinct from the indigenous population in other areas. As a result, some of the negrito-type ancestry may be getting lumped into the South Asian cluster, which is making that component seem more AASI-shifted than it was in reality.

    It was probably a South Indian group however. Most of the states with the most developed maritime traditions were around modern Kerala and Tamil Nadu. I believe in most cases their full cultural flowering was a bit later than the first century CE, but this may be more an issue of spottiness of records than anything.
    Overall, I mean, I think there could some elite process, but think it also would’ve been accompanied by retinue (military / commercial) of ordinary South Asians, and their families. Even Conquistadors were not just elite Iberians but accompanied by the ordinary “sweepings of the streets”, Conversos etc? Who all contributed to present day Latin America. And in SE Asia it probably would’ve been a composite process over time, probably throughout entire last 2000 years. Not one pulse. It does seem likely that elite associated male lineages introduced would show more survival over time though, but I think getting from “What y-dna survives” to the exact autosomal construction of the migrating populations, I’m not sure about that. Y-dna can replicate fast but can “get away” from main autosomal contributions. Say you could’ve had elite Indians who really spread y-dna fast by marrying local gels, but really autosomally diluted fast, while at same time a greater mass of ordinary Indians migrates and make less y-dna impact but lasts more in autosome…
    Btw, where I said samples looked like populations were “pointing” at more South Indian/Middle-Low populations in their internal diversity/clines, here’s a graphic illustration of what

    I mean: https://imgur.com/a/qYUQfpg

    Using the Eurogenes Global 25 data again I’ve taken some frame population averages to generate more PCA, which have a PC1 distinguishing South Asian from East Asian, PC2 splitting North China like/Sino-Tibetan populations from ISEA populations (most North China like/Sino-Tibetan is Naga followed by Korean/Nyishi, then Han, most ISEA is Lebbo, followed by Indonesians from Bali), then PC3 splitting ANI from ASI (Kalash most ANI, Paniya most ASI).

    Then I take the main population cline for the Burmese, Thai, Malay using regression and project it on. The “point” on the intra-East Asian clines tends to look about right (e.g. Thai point is close to Dai, Malay is close to Indonesian Bali, Burmese close to Central China). It doesn’t look to be pointing to a two way model between a populations anywhere on East Asian clines, and a population that has much of a North Indian like structure.

    That may be due to the compound effects Razib talks about though, where you really have a complex mixes between Mlabri like populations, some varied set of populations on the South Asian cline, and then some populations on the intra-East Asian cline.

    For the Thai population the clines suggest they are can be approximated as a two-way ongoing admixture compound between a mainly Dai+Taiwan Aboriginal like population with a population that is 57:25:18 Mlabri:Irula:Kalash. (Irula:Kalash ratio 58:42, which is about equally between Brahmin populations and Piramalai Kallars). For the Burmese a mainly Naga like population mixes with a point that is 30:48:22 Mlabri:Irula:Kalash (68:32 Irula:Kalash is about the same as Bengalis/Piramalai Kallars).
    South Asian-East Asian cline (x-axis) vs SEA-NEA cline (y-axis)
     


    AASI-ANI cline (x-axis) vs SEA-NEA cline (y-axis)
     


    Attempts to model different ends of the Burmese, Thai, and Malay clines. Looks like Cline1 is the "East Asian" end and Cline2 is the "South Asian" end?
     


     

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to okarinaofsteiner For This Useful Post:

     parasar (08-01-2021),  Tsakhur (08-02-2021)

  14. #68
    Registered Users
    Posts
    19
    Sex
    Location
    Singapore
    Ethnicity
    Malay
    Nationality
    Malaysian
    Y-DNA (P)
    M1
    mtDNA (M)
    R22

    Hi All,

    I am a Malay born in Malaysia but grew up in Singapore.

    Below are my admixutre according to LivingDNA, only 4.1% Near East and 1.4% Northwest Europe:

    Asia (East): 78.1%
    Southeast Asia - 46.7%
    South China - 27.8%
    Japan and Korea - 3.6%

    Asia (South): 14.5%
    Indian subcontinent - 8.1%
    Pashtun - 6.5%

    Near East: 4.1%
    North Turkey - 2.9%
    Armenia and Cyprus - 1.1%

    Oceania: 1.8%
    Austronesia - 1.8%

    Europe: 1.4%
    Northwestern Europe - 1.4%

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Encik Ahmad For This Useful Post:

     okarinaofsteiner (08-02-2021)

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-26-2021, 11:27 AM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-18-2021, 06:26 PM
  3. Replies: 73
    Last Post: 07-09-2018, 06:24 PM
  4. How much ancient West Eurasian ancestry do Amerindians have?
    By Tsakhur in forum Autosomal (auDNA)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-18-2017, 12:06 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-14-2016, 05:53 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •