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Thread: Medieval mtDNA from Napole cemetery, Poland - Scandinavian?

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    Medieval mtDNA from Napole cemetery, Poland - Scandinavian?

    Tomasz Płoszaj, Krystyna Jędrychowska-Dańska, Alicja Masłowska, Tomasz Kozłowski, Wojciech Chudziak, Jacek Bojarski, Agnieszka Robaszkiewicz & Henryk W. Witas, Analysis of medieval mtDNA from Napole cemetery provides new insights into the early history of Polish state, Annals of Human Biology, posted online: 08 Feb 2016

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/1...0.2016.1151550

    Contemporary historical anthropology and classical archaeology are concerned not only with such fundamental issues as the origins of ancient human populations and migration routes, but also with the formation and development of interpopulation relations and the mixing of gene pools as a result of interbreeding between individuals representing different cultural units. The contribution of immigrants to the analysed autochthonous population and their effect on the gene pool of that population has proven difficult to evaluate with classical morphological methods. The burial of one individual in the studied Napole cemetery located in central Poland had the form of a chamber grave, which is typical of Scandinavian culture from that period. However, this fact cannot be interpreted as absolute proof that the individual (in the biological sense) was allochtonous. This gives rise to the question as to who was actually buried in that cemetery. The ancient DNA results indicate that one of the individuals had an mtDNA haplotype typical of Iron Age northern Europe, which suggests that he could have arrived from that area at a later period. This seems to indirectly confirm the claims of many anthropologists that the development of the early medieval Polish state was significantly and directly influenced by the Scandinavians.
    I don't have access to the full text, which is behind a paywall. Can't imagine how they concluded the mtDNA was Scandinavian. But here you are.

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    I don't know of any mtDNA that is uniquely Scandinavian. Ny own, which is from Sweden, is certainly found outside of Scandinavia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenHind View Post
    I don't know of any mtDNA that is uniquely Scandinavian.
    That's exactly the problem. mtDNA mutates rather rarely--on the average, every couple thousand years. It's simply not specific enough for ethnic classification. My cousin (100% Polish) has 23 exact full-sequence mtDNA matches, from:
    Austria
    England
    Ireland
    Norway
    Poland
    Scotland
    Sweden
    Wales
    Last edited by lgmayka; 02-27-2016 at 03:32 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lgmayka View Post
    That's exactly the problem. mtDNA mutates rather rarely--on the average, every couple thousand years. It's simply not specific enough for ethnic classification. My cousin (100% Polish) has 23 exact full-sequence mtDNA matches, from:
    Austria
    England
    Ireland
    Norway
    Poland
    Scotland
    Sweden
    Wales
    Can you share his haplotype?

    Thanks,

    Jack

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    Quote Originally Posted by C J Wyatt III View Post
    Can you share his haplotype?
    They did not publish the haplotype in the abstract, so someone would have to purchase the article to find out the haplotype. I don't think that is worthwhile because you probably cannot conclude anything about the specific geographic origin of the person from the mtDNA.

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    I don't have access to the full text, which is behind a paywall. Can't imagine how they concluded the mtDNA was Scandinavian. But here you are.
    $54? Who makes money from selling these articles? What's the point of hiding from the public the results of your research? For some reason I also prefer to see international teams working together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lugus View Post
    $54? Who makes money from selling these articles? What's the point of hiding from the public the results of your research? For some reason I also prefer to see international teams working together.
    Authors choose journals according to 'impact factor', and whether the article gets accepted or not. The Journal's parent company (in this case Taylor & Francis) make the money, not a cent goes to authors. Yes, they have costs to cover, but the prices are getting obscene - the charges of T & F are one of the highest per article, perhaps second worse to de Gruyter. Other academics can obtain the articles from their universities - but even then some of them cannot, becuase the university might not have a subscription to a said journal.

    Authors have the ability to make their article free, but they in turn have to pay, which is a lot to ask for smaller institutions.
    But they can make the choice of using more reasonable journals (incl free ones like PLOS One), boycott the more expensive ones, and they can upload their articles to academic sites like Academia or ResearchGate, or simply 'accidently' post a PDF online, but they have to be careful as some Journals and Publishing companies (for book chapters) impose a 'quarantine' for a certain period post publication.
    Last edited by Gravetto-Danubian; 02-27-2016 at 08:45 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by C J Wyatt III View Post
    Can you share his haplotype?
    If you mean my cousin, he belongs to K1c1b.
    Code:
    64890 	Stefania Kolbusz, b. 1909, Kamienica Górna, Poland 	K1c1b 	A16129G, T16187C, C16189T, T16223C, T16224C, G16230A, T16278C 	C195T, A247G, C498d, 522.1A, 522.2C, 309.1C, 315.1C

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gravetto-Danubian View Post
    Authors ... can upload their articles to academic sites like Academia or ResearchGate.
    In this case, you can request a copy via ResearchGate, though I don't think I'm going to bother.
    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tomasz_Kozlowski3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jean M View Post
    In this case, you can request a copy via ResearchGate, though I don't think I'm going to bother.
    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tomasz_Kozlowski3
    Thanks, I sent a request, let's see what happens. I'm particularly interested in eastern European Mtdna because my haplogroup even if it's found in many places does seem to have some connection to that area.

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