Page 108 of 137 FirstFirst ... 85898106107108109110118 ... LastLast
Results 1,071 to 1,080 of 1369

Thread: New DNA Papers

  1. #1071
    Registered Users
    Posts
    293
    Sex

    Hungarians who live in Central Europe today are one of the westernmost Uralic speakers. Despite of the proposed Volga-Ural/West Siberian roots of the Hungarian language, the present-day Hungarian gene pool is highly similar to that of the surrounding Indo-European speaking populations. However, a limited portion of specific Y-chromosomal lineages from haplogroup N, sometimes associated with the spread of Uralic languages, link modern Hungarians with populations living close to the Ural Mountain range on the border of Europe and Asia. Here we investigate the paternal genetic connection between these spatially separated populations. We reconstruct the phylogeny of N3a4-Z1936 clade by using 33 high-coverage Y-chromosomal sequences and estimate the coalescent times of its sub-clades. We genotype close to 5000 samples from 46 Eurasian populations to show the presence of N3a4-B539 lineages among Hungarians and in the populations from Ural Mountain region, including Ob-Ugric-speakers from West Siberia who are geographically distant but linguistically closest to Hungarians. This sub-clade splits from its sister-branch N3a4-B535, frequent today among Northeast European Uralic speakers, 4000–5000 ya, which is in the time-frame of the proposed divergence of Ugric languages.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-44272-6

  2. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to gravetti For This Useful Post:

     Grossvater (05-25-2019),  Judith (05-27-2019),  Piquerobi (05-24-2019),  razyn (05-24-2019),  RCO (05-24-2019),  rozenfeld (05-24-2019),  Saetro (05-24-2019),  szahel (05-24-2019)

  3. #1072
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,455
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    C-F5481
    mtDNA (M)
    M8a

    Kyrgyzstan
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-44121-6

    Article | Open | Published: 24 May 2019

    Spatially explicit analysis reveals complex human genetic gradients in the Iberian Peninsula


    João Pimenta, Alexandra M. Lopes, Angel Carracedo, Miguel Arenas, António Amorim & David Comas

    Scientific Reports 9, Article number: 7825 (2019) | Download Citation

    Abstract

    The Iberian Peninsula is a well-delimited geographic region with a rich and complex human history. However, the causes of its genetic structure and past migratory dynamics are not yet fully understood. In order to shed light on them, here we evaluated the gene flow and genetic structure throughout the Iberian Peninsula with spatially explicit modelling applied to a georeferenced genetic dataset composed of genome-wide SNPs from 746 individuals belonging to 17 different regions of the Peninsula. We found contrasting patterns of genetic structure throughout Iberia. In particular, we identified strong patterns of genetic differentiation caused by relevant barriers to gene flow in northern regions and, on the other hand, a large genetic similarity in central and southern regions. In addition, our results showed a preferential north to south migratory dynamics and suggest a sex-biased dispersal in Mediterranean and southern regions. The estimated genetic patterns did not fit with the geographical relief of the Iberian landscape and they rather seem to follow political and linguistic territorial boundaries.

  4. The Following 15 Users Say Thank You to rozenfeld For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (05-24-2019),  Angoliga (05-25-2019),  ArmandoR1b (05-24-2019),  JMcB (05-25-2019),  Judith (05-26-2019),  Megalophias (05-24-2019),  Piquerobi (05-24-2019),  Principe (05-24-2019),  razyn (05-24-2019),  RCO (05-24-2019),  Ruderico (05-24-2019),  Ryukendo (05-24-2019),  Saetro (05-25-2019),  Targum (05-24-2019),  traject (05-24-2019)

  5. #1073
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    531
    Sex
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Ethnicity
    Polish/British Isles
    Nationality
    U.S.
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-A9185
    mtDNA (M)
    H1
    mtDNA (P)
    J1c2

    Poland England Ireland Munster

    unidentified, deeply diverged population admixed with modern humans within Africa

    Models of archaic admixture and recent history from two-locus statistics
    Aaron P Ragsdale, Simon Gravel
    Abstract
    We learn about population history and underlying evolutionary biology through patterns of genetic polymorphism. Many approaches to reconstruct evolutionary histories focus on a limited number of informative statistics describing distributions of allele frequencies or patterns of linkage disequilibrium. We show that many commonly used statistics are part of a broad family of two-locus moments whose expectation can be computed jointly and rapidly under a wide range of scenarios, including complex multi-population demographies with continuous migration and admixture events. A full inspection of these statistics reveals that widely used models of human history fail to predict simple patterns of linkage disequilibrium. To jointly capture the information contained in classical and novel statistics, we implemented a tractable likelihood-based inference framework for demographic history. Using this approach, we show that human evolutionary models that include archaic admixture in Africa, Asia, and Europe provide a much better description of patterns of genetic diversity across the human genome. We estimate that an unidentified, deeply diverged population admixed with modern humans within Africa both before and after the split of African and Eurasian populations, contributing 4−8% genetic ancestry to individuals in world-wide populations.

    Author Summary
    Throughout human history, populations have expanded and contracted, split and merged, and exchanged migrants. Because these events affected genetic diversity, we can learn about human history by comparing predictions from evolutionary models to genetic data. Here, we show how to rapidly compute such predictions for a wide range of diversity measures within and across populations under complex demographic scenarios. While widely used models of human history accurately predict common measures of diversity, we show that they strongly underestimate the co-occurence of low frequency mutations within human populations in Asia, Europe, and Africa. Models allowing for archaic admixture, the relatively recent mixing of human populations with deeply diverged human lineages, resolve this discrepancy. We use such models to infer demographic models that include both recent and ancient features of human history. We recover the well-characterized admixture of Neanderthals in Eurasian populations, as well as admixture from an as-yet unknown diverged human population within Africa, further suggesting that admixture with deeply diverged lineages occurred multiple times in human history. By simultaneously testing model predictions for a broad range of diversity statistics, we can assess the robustness of common evolutionary models, identify missing historical events, and build more informed models of human demography.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  6. The Following 16 Users Say Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (05-27-2019),  Angoliga (05-27-2019),  blackflash16 (05-26-2019),  CannabisErectusHibernius (05-28-2019),  Judith (05-26-2019),  Lank (05-27-2019),  Mansamusa (05-27-2019),  Michalis Moriopoulos (05-27-2019),  Nebuchadnezzar II (05-27-2019),  Nibelung (05-26-2019),  peternorth (05-27-2019),  Piquerobi (05-26-2019),  RCO (05-26-2019),  Ruderico (05-26-2019),  VytautusofAukstaitija (05-26-2019),  Wing Genealogist (05-26-2019)

  7. #1074
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,455
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    C-F5481
    mtDNA (M)
    M8a

    Kyrgyzstan
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/650986v1

    Population history and genetic adaptation of the Fulani nomads: Inferences from genome-wide data and the lactase persistence trait

    Mario Vicente, Edita Priehodova, Issa Diallo, Eliska Podgorna, Estella S Poloni, Viktor Cerny, View ORCID ProfileCarina M Schlebusch

    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/650986

    Preview PDF

    Abstract

    Human population history in the Holocene was profoundly impacted by changes in lifestyle following the invention and adoption of food-production practices. These changes triggered significant increases in population sizes and expansions over large distances. Here we investigate the population history of the Fulani, a pastoral population extending throughout the African Sahel/Savannah belt. Based on genome-wide analyses we propose that ancestors of the Fulani population experienced admixture between a West African group and a group carrying both European and North African ancestries. This admixture was likely coupled with newly adopted herding practices, as it resulted in signatures of genetic adaptation in contemporary Fulani genomes, including the control element of the LCT gene enabling carriers to digest lactose throughout their lives. The lactase persistence (LP) trait in the Fulani is conferred by the presence of the allele T-13910, which is also present at high frequencies in Europe. We establish that the T-13910 LP allele in Fulani individuals analysed in this study lies on a European haplotype background thus excluding parallel convergent evolution. Our findings further suggest that Eurasian admixture and the European LP allele was introduced into the Fulani through contact with a North African population/s. We furthermore confirm the link between the lactose digestion phenotype in the Fulani to the MCM6/LCT locus by reporting the first Genome Wide Association study (GWAS) of the lactase persistence trait. We also further explored signals of recent adaptation in the Fulani and identified additional candidates for selection to adapt to herding life-styles.

  8. The Following 17 Users Say Thank You to rozenfeld For This Useful Post:

     ADW_1981 (05-27-2019),  Agamemnon (05-27-2019),  Angoliga (05-27-2019),  Bernard (05-27-2019),  blackflash16 (05-27-2019),  etrusco (05-27-2019),  Lank (05-27-2019),  Mansamusa (05-27-2019),  Michalis Moriopoulos (05-27-2019),  Nebuchadnezzar II (05-27-2019),  parasar (05-27-2019),  peternorth (05-27-2019),  Piquerobi (05-30-2019),  pmokeefe (05-27-2019),  Saetro (05-27-2019),  spruithean (05-27-2019),  VytautusofAukstaitija (05-31-2019)

  9. #1075
    Registered Users
    Posts
    5,543
    Sex
    Location
    Australia
    Ethnicity
    Italian Alpine
    Nationality
    Australian and Italian
    Y-DNA (P)
    T1a2b- SK1480
    mtDNA (M)
    H95a
    Y-DNA (M)
    R1b-S8172
    mtDNA (P)
    T2b17

    Australia Italy Veneto Friuli Italy Trentino Alto Adige Italy Ladinia Austria Tirol
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-43183-w


    PDF
    Goth migration induced changes in the matrilineal genetic structure of the central-east European population
    Article | OPEN | Published: 01 May 2019

    Goth migration induced changes in the matrilineal genetic structure of the central-east European population
    I. Stolarek, L. Handschuh, […]M. Figlerowicz
    Scientific Reports 9, Article number: 6737 (2019) | Download Citation

    Abstract
    For years, the issues related to the origin of the Goths and their early migrations in the Iron Age have been a matter of hot debate among archaeologists. Unfortunately, the lack of new independent data has precluded the evaluation of the existing hypothesis. To overcome this problem, we initiated systematic studies of the populations inhabiting the contemporary territory of Poland during the Iron Age. Here, we present an analysis of mitochondrial DNA isolated from 27 individuals (collectively called the Mas-VBIA group) excavated from an Iron Age cemetery (dated to the 2nd-4th century A.D.) attributed to Goths and located near Masłomęcz, eastern Poland.
    Last edited by vettor; 05-30-2019 at 09:08 PM.


    My Path = ( K-M9+, TL-P326+, T-M184+, L490+, M70+, PF5664+, L131+, L446+, CTS933+, CTS3767+, CTS8862+, Z19945+, BY143483 )


    Grandfather via paternal grandmother = I1-L22 ydna
    Great grandmother paternal side = T1a1e mtdna

  10. The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to vettor For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (06-02-2019),  Alain (06-02-2019),  Baltimore1937 (06-01-2019),  Cascio (06-01-2019),  Dewsloth (05-30-2019),  etrusco (05-30-2019),  JMcB (05-31-2019),  Nibelung (05-30-2019),  palamede (05-31-2019),  Piquerobi (05-30-2019),  pmokeefe (07-11-2019),  Saetro (05-31-2019),  spruithean (05-31-2019)

  11. #1076
    Registered Users
    Posts
    525
    Sex
    Location
    England
    Y-DNA (P)
    J1
    mtDNA (M)
    K1a10a

    United States of America England
    EXPLOSION FROM THE STEPPE?
    THE DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGINS OF THE Y-HAPLOGROUP R1a
    Dr. Joe Flood
    DRAFT May 28 2019
    SUMMARY: The Y-haplogroup R1a is found in quantity over a vast area stretching east-west across
    the Eurasian steppe from Scandinavia to China, and north-south from the Urals to Sri Lanka, then
    west to Arabia. The subclade distribution of R1a is spatially differentiated, showing that the
    mainstream R1a1a1 of the steppe expanded in different directions from only two men who lived
    after 3000 BC. The initial expansions are extreme founder effects in the early Bronze Age, probably a
    bottleneck 'Event', while later expansions occurred in part through the control of key resources and
    strategic access to food technology.
    R1a may have originally travelled to the steppe via the Middle East and Central Europe in the early
    Holocene with other subclades of archaic R1, leaving small early trace branches behind. The main
    R1a1a line is found in ancient DNA as a minority of about 20 per cent within ‘Europoid’ Neolithic
    populations on the Dnieper and Volga basins. As associates of Yamna traders they supplied Urals and
    Altai minerals to settled early Bronze Age cultures around the Caucasus, gaining early access to the
    package of Bronze Age technologies. Two R1a men living around 3000 BC and carrying the Z283 and
    Z93 mutations survived an extreme bottleneck event that destroyed the Cucuteni-Trypillia and
    Maykop cultures. R1a subsequently expanded very rapidly into almost empty space, often taking on
    the characteristics of the cultures with whom they came in contact. Today at least 150 million men
    are descended from these two founders.
    Employing their skills with overland and river trading, metalworking and mining, the wheel, herding,
    the axe and the plough, the western branch R1a-Z283 formed the Corded Ware/Battle
    Axe/Catacomb culture of the South Baltic and Scandinavia, supported by the amber and salt trade.
    To the east R1a-Z93 gained control of the trade in metals from the Urals, continuing to mine and
    ship copper for the southern civilisations, and expanding with R1b as the Poltavka kurgan culture
    along the Volga and Don rivers. As well as gaining the benefits of trade, they were probably assisted
    by improvements in herding technology, and spread east and south on the steppe.
    From about 2200 BC, R1a-Z94 tribespeople displaced by the 4.2 kiloyear drying event founded the
    Sintashta fortified settlements near the Ural River and east to the Altai. They followed the southern
    trade routes through the proto-urban Bactria-Margiana complex on the Amu Darya river, gaining
    control of key mineral resources in Bactria and the Punjab and along the Silk Road, and moving as far
    east as the Tarim basin in China.
    Almost immediately they settled within the dispersed remnants of the advanced Indus civilization,
    bringing the Indo-Aryan language of the Avestas and the Vedas into South Asia, and forming the late
    Indus culture as a group of R1a-dominated Aryan tribes. By the middle Bronze Age these tribes
    consolidated into the urban kingdoms of North India and the Ganges plain; codifying the Vedas and
    creating the Hindu caste system in which they held the highest ranks.
    The wandering R1a tribes proceeded simultaneously through Iran to Arabia. In all this rapid
    movement and expansion, they continued to employ the tented bullock wagon to move and settle
    over vast distances. They were probably also assisted by river transport and the newly-invented
    chariot.
    ii
    The R1a expansion concluded at the end of the Bronze Age when the civilizations of Eurasia no
    longer required exotic minerals. Although the steppe mastered mounted archery, leading to the
    military successes of the Scythians and Sarmatians, R1a probably lost ground to tribes from further
    east, and was challenged to the west and south.
    In mediaeval times, the Slavic and Ashkenazi expansions occurred in East-central Europe, creating
    friction with the expanding Germanic tribes. The ramifications have extended almost to the present.
    The last expansion of R1a took place in the New World as a 'massive migration'.
    The theory underlying this narrative is that Y-distributions in established populations maintain a selfsimilar subclade distribution and remain largely unchanged in proportion unless subjected to specific
    shocks or forces. These may include bottlenecks, selective improvements in acquisition of food due
    to improved technology or trade, and large migrations. R1a has been subject to all of these changes
    during its five-thousand-year history as a substantial haplogroup.
    Considerable improvements in testing of modern and ancient Y-DNA will be necessary to confirm the
    details of this outline.

    https://www.academia.edu/39342899/EX...jaZZYXutS3pQuc

  12. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to J1 DYS388=13 For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (06-02-2019),  Alain (06-02-2019),  parasar (06-02-2019),  spruithean (06-02-2019),  vettor (06-02-2019)

  13. #1077
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,455
    Sex
    Y-DNA (P)
    C-F5481
    mtDNA (M)
    M8a

    Kyrgyzstan
    Another candidate for Genghis Khan's lineage:



    https://www.nature.com/articles/s10038-019-0618-0

    Brief Communication | Published: 05 June 2019

    Molecular genealogy of Tusi Lu’s family reveals their paternal relationship with Jochi, Genghis Khan’s eldest son

    Shao-Qing Wen, Hong-Bing Yao, Pan-Xin Du, Lan-Hai Wei, Xin-Zhu Tong, Ling-Xiang Wang, Chuan-Chao Wang, Bo-Yan Zhou, Mei-Sen Shi, Maxat Zhabagin, Jiucun Wang, Dan Xu, Li Jin & Hui Li

    Journal of Human Genetics (2019) | Download Citation

    Abstract

    Genghis Khan’s lineage has attracted both academic and general interest because of its mystery and large influence. However, the truth behind the mystery is complicated and continues to confound the scientific study. In this study, we surveyed the molecular genealogy of Northwestern China’s Lu clan who claim to be the descendants of the sixth son of Genghis Khan, Toghan. We also investigated living members of the Huo and Tuo clans, who, according to oral tradition, were close male relatives of Lu clan. Using network analysis, we found that the Y-chromosomal haplotypes of Lu clan mainly belong to haplogroup C2b1a1b1-F1756, widely prevalent in Altaic-speaking populations, and are closely related to the Tore clan from Kazakhstan, who claim to be the descendants of the first son of Genghis Khan, Jochi. The most recent common ancestor of the special haplotype cluster that includes the Lu clan and Tore clan lived about 1000 years ago (YA), while the Huo and Tuo clans do not share any Y lineages with the Lu clan. In addition to the reported lineages, such as C3*-Star Cluster, R1b-M343, and Q, our results indicate that haplogroup C2b1a1b1-F1756 might be another candidate of the true Y lineage of Genghis Khan.

  14. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to rozenfeld For This Useful Post:

     Afshar (06-05-2019),  Agamemnon (06-05-2019),  Angoliga (06-06-2019),  cpan0256 (06-05-2019),  Grossvater (06-05-2019),  JMcB (06-05-2019),  Megalophias (06-05-2019),  palamede (06-05-2019),  Principe (06-05-2019),  RCO (06-05-2019),  VytautusofAukstaitija (06-05-2019)

  15. #1078
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    531
    Sex
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Ethnicity
    Polish/British Isles
    Nationality
    U.S.
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-A9185
    mtDNA (M)
    H1
    mtDNA (P)
    J1c2

    Poland England Ireland Munster

    Neanderthal-Denisovan ancestors interbred with a distantly-related hominin

    Neanderthal-Denisovan ancestors interbred with a distantly-related hominin
    Abstract
    Previous research has shown that modern Eurasians interbred with their Neanderthal and Denisovan predecessors. We show here that hundreds of thousands of years earlier, the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovans interbred with their own Eurasian predecessors—members of a “superarchaic” population that separated from other humans about 2 mya. The superarchaic population was large, with an effective size between 10 and 46 thousand individuals. We confirm previous findings that: (1) Denisovans also interbred with superarchaics, (2) Neanderthals and Denisovans separated early in the middle Pleistocene, (3) their ancestors endured a bottleneck of population size, and (4) the Neanderthal population was large at first but then declined in size. We provide qualified support for the view that (5) Neanderthals interbred with the ancestors of modern humans.

    Author summary
    We show that early in the middle Pleistocene, long before the expansion of modern humans into Eurasia, the “neandersovan” ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovans undertook a very similar expansion. In both cases, an African population expanded into Eurasia, endured a narrow bottleneck of population size, interbred with indigeneous Eurasians, largely replaced them, and split into eastern and western sub-populations. In the earlier expansion, neandersovans interbred with a “superarchaic” population that had been separate since about 2 mya and may represent the original expansion of humans into Eurasia.
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  16. The Following 17 Users Say Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (06-05-2019),  Angoliga (06-06-2019),  cpan0256 (06-06-2019),  Grossvater (06-05-2019),  J Man (06-05-2019),  jdean (06-05-2019),  JMcB (06-05-2019),  Judith (06-08-2019),  Kale (06-05-2019),  Kelso (06-05-2019),  Megalophias (06-05-2019),  palamede (06-05-2019),  peternorth (06-11-2019),  RCO (06-05-2019),  Ruderico (06-05-2019),  Sangarius (06-13-2019),  VytautusofAukstaitija (06-05-2019)

  17. #1079
    Gold Class Member
    Posts
    531
    Sex
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Ethnicity
    Polish/British Isles
    Nationality
    U.S.
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-A9185
    mtDNA (M)
    H1
    mtDNA (P)
    J1c2

    Poland England Ireland Munster

    The lineages of the first humans to reach northeastern Siberia and the Americas

    Palaeo-Eskimo genetic ancestry and the peopling of Chukotka and North America
    Nature 05 June 2019

    Abstract
    Much of the American Arctic was first settled 5,000 years ago, by groups of people known as Palaeo-Eskimos. They were subsequently joined and largely displaced around 1,000 years ago by ancestors of the present-day Inuit and Yup’ik. The genetic relationship between Palaeo-Eskimos and Native American, Inuit, Yup’ik and Aleut populations remains uncertain. Here we present genomic data for 48 ancient individuals from Chukotka, East Siberia, the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, and the Canadian Arctic. We co-analyse these data with data from present-day Alaskan Iñupiat and West Siberian populations and published genomes. Using methods based on rare-allele and haplotype sharing, as well as established techniques, we show that Palaeo-Eskimo-related ancestry is ubiquitous among people who speak Na-Dene and Eskimo–Aleut languages. We develop a comprehensive model for the Holocene peopling events of Chukotka and North America, and show that Na-Dene-speaking peoples, people of the Aleutian Islands, and Yup’ik and Inuit across the Arctic region all share ancestry from a single Palaeo-Eskimo-related Siberian source.

    The population history of northeastern Siberia since the Pleistocene
    Sikora et al
    Nature 05 June 2019

    Abstract
    Northeastern Siberia has been inhabited by humans for more than 40,000 years but its deep population history remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the late Pleistocene population history of northeastern Siberia through analyses of 34 newly recovered ancient genomes that date to between 31,000 and 600 years ago. We document complex population dynamics during this period, including at least three major migration events: an initial peopling by a previously unknown Palaeolithic population of ‘Ancient North Siberians’ who are distantly related to early West Eurasian hunter-gatherers; the arrival of East Asian-related peoples, which gave rise to ‘Ancient Palaeo-Siberians’ who are closely related to contemporary communities from far-northeastern Siberia (such as the Koryaks), as well as Native Americans; and a Holocene migration of other East Asian-related peoples, who we name ‘Neo-Siberians’, and from whom many contemporary Siberians are descended. Each of these population expansions largely replaced the earlier inhabitants, and ultimately generated the mosaic genetic make-up of contemporary peoples who inhabit a vast area across northern Eurasia and the Americas.

    The lineages of the first humans to reach northeastern Siberia and the Americas
    Nature NEWS AND VIEWS 05 JUNE 2019
    Humans reached the Americas from northeastern Siberia during the last ice age. Genomic analyses of ancient and modern individuals reveal the history of the peoples who have populated these regions.
    ...
    Sikora et al. analysed genomic data from 34 people from ancient northeastern Siberia. Two individuals were buried at Yana RHS in Russia — a 31,600-year-old archaeological site that contains the earliest human remains found in the far northeast of Siberia — and the others date from 9,800 to 600 years ago. The Yana individuals provide the only genomic data gathered so far from northeastern Siberia before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, about 26,500 to 19,000 years ago), although there is evidence of human occupation in central Siberia as early as 45,000 years ago.
    Last edited by pmokeefe; 06-05-2019 at 06:41 PM. Reason: Added link to Nature News and Views
    YFull: YF14620 (Dante Labs 2018)

  18. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to pmokeefe For This Useful Post:

     Angoliga (06-06-2019),  Baltimore1937 (06-06-2019),  Grossvater (06-07-2019),  JMcB (06-13-2019),  Kristiina (06-05-2019),  Megalophias (06-05-2019),  palamede (06-06-2019),  razyn (06-06-2019),  xenus (06-06-2019)

  19. #1080
    Registered Users
    Posts
    192
    Sex

    A paper I missed from 2018 Assessing the Relationship of Ancient and
    Modern Populations
    https://www.genetics.org/content/gen...1/383.full.pdf

    I haven't seen anyone talk about this paper and it's probably because rather than being a large study reflecting the title of the paper it is actually more a proof of concept for their methodology. The technique they use is to take low coverage genomes (0.5x-1.0x) and pool them together. I did skip around in it a bit but it seems that the argument is that it's more cost effective and provides a more representative set of SNPs.

  20. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to xenus For This Useful Post:

     palamede (06-08-2019),  pmokeefe (06-06-2019)

Page 108 of 137 FirstFirst ... 85898106107108109110118 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Genetic Papers - Kurds
    By Kurd in forum Western
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 09-19-2018, 05:33 AM
  2. Some Additional Papers on the Vikings
    By JMcB in forum I1-M253
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-17-2016, 08:45 AM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-14-2016, 03:21 AM
  4. Papers on Z220
    By ADW_1981 in forum R1b-DF27
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-05-2015, 06:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •