Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Is it just me or do others note a U.S. North/South difference in DNA testing

  1. #1
    Registered Users
    Posts
    791
    Sex
    Location
    Waterville, ME
    Ethnicity
    Great Migration Colonists
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U106 (S10415)
    mtDNA (M)
    J1c2g (FMS)
    Y-DNA (M)
    I1a-P109 (23andMe)
    mtDNA (P)
    T2b3 (23andMe)

    United States Gadsden England Scotland Ireland Wales

    Is it just me or do others note a U.S. North/South difference in DNA testing

    Being from Maine (and you cannot get more north than this in the Continental U.S.), I am surprised where most of my Autosomal matches are from folks from "The South" rather than from "The North".

    I believe (although I could well be wrong) this is due to the fact more Southerners are doing DNA testing than Northerners. This may possibly be due to an effect of the Civil War where many of the courthouses (and records) in the South were destroyed. Folks from the South have a much harder time tracing their (paper) family tree than us "Yankees". By contrast, New England tends to have great records going all the way back to the founding of most towns.

    I would like to hear others opinions on this. I believe this also needs to be considered when looking at the demographics of people testing. For example, I believe Scots tended to settle more in the South than the North. Also, according to "Albion's Seed" they linked the Northern "Puritans/Pilgrims" as being from Saxon areas while the Southern "Cavaliers" were more from East Anglia. Of course their are exceptions to this rule.

  2. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Wing Genealogist For This Useful Post:

     AJL (05-23-2016),  AnnieD (08-11-2016),  Baltimore1937 (05-24-2016),  dp (05-23-2016),  PureEvil (06-08-2016),  Táltos (05-25-2016),  WilliamAllan (05-23-2016),  wombatofthenorth (07-17-2016)

  3. #2
    Registered Users
    Posts
    893
    Sex
    Location
    USA
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    I-FT248579
    mtDNA (M)
    H5

    United States of America Canada
    Seach Antrogenica for "Thomas Edward Green" and you will have your answer.

    By the way, my mother is Canadian and only had one known Colonial American line through Pennsylvania until DNA testing when she picked up all of the southern bunch and common ancestry with my southerner father.

    Jack Wyatt
    Last edited by C J Wyatt III; 05-23-2016 at 12:50 PM.

  4. #3
    Registered Users
    Posts
    2,289
    Sex
    Location
    Canada
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Euro/Near East
    Nationality
    Canadian
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1a-YP4516/YP4807*
    mtDNA (M)
    H11a2a3

    Canada Franco-Manitoban European Union Ottoman Empire Russia Imperial United States Grand Union
    Quote Originally Posted by Wing Genealogist View Post
    Being from Maine (and you cannot get more north than this in the Continental U.S.), I am surprised where most of my Autosomal matches are from folks from "The South" rather than from "The North".
    Like you, I have more ties to Southerners than expected. I have about one-eighth colonial New England/northeast ancestry (MA, RI, NJ, NY, ME, NH, CT, PA, VT) and no known Southern ancestry, though I know of Northern lines as well as Scottish and Ulster Scot lines where relatives moved to the South. I never thought about testing rates being the cause but that's a very likely explanation.

    I also have several "carpetbagger" second great-grand aunts who came from Canada to NC around 1870.

    No doubt there was considerable movement of people between the South and North well before the Civil War, mainly through border areas like OH/KY/VA/WV/MD/DE/PA. Both Philadelphia and Baltimore were large ports, and siblings who arrived may have set out in opposite directions.

    Still, I suspect my many matches to Southerners mostly go back to England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, and Germany, and maybe in a few cases France. It would be interesting to look at Y surname projects and see if there are many cases where related same-surname male lines end up independently in both the Northeast and the Southeast. Perhaps that was rather common.
     

    Other ancestral Y lines:

    E1b-M81 Ukraine (Ashkenazi)
    E1b-V13 England
    I1-M253 Ireland
    I2-M423 Ukraine
    R1a-L176.1 Scotland
    R1b-L584 Syria/Turkey (Sephardi)
    R1b-L20 Ireland
    R1b-L21 (1)England; (2)Wales?>Connecticut
    R1b-L48 England
    R1b-P312 Scotland
    R1b-FGC32576 Ireland

    Other ancestral mtDNA lines:

    H1b2a Ukraine (Ashkenazi)
    H6a1a3 Ukraine
    K1a9 Belarus (Ashkenazi)
    K1c2 Ireland
    V7a Ukraine

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to AJL For This Useful Post:

     Táltos (05-25-2016)

  6. #4
    Registered Users
    Posts
    4,416
    Sex
    Location
    Tierra de Ayllon
    Y-DNA (P)
    U152>L2>Z49>Z142>
    mtDNA (M)
    H1bt
    Y-DNA (M)
    I2a2a1b2a1b1>Y4925
    mtDNA (P)
    H37

    England Scotland Wales Germany Ireland Sweden Finns
    Just my impression but I believe Southerners are more likely to be involved in genealogy. Conservative values and interest in heritage go hand in hand. Same reason why a disproportionate number officers in the US military are from the South.

    Last edited by MitchellSince1893; 05-23-2016 at 04:36 PM.
    Y DNA line continued: Z142>Z12222>FGC12378>FGC12401>FGC12384
    35% English, 26% Scot/Ulster Scot, 14% Welsh, 14% German, 5% Ireland, 3% Nordic, 2% French/Dutch, 1% India
    Hidden Content

  7. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to MitchellSince1893 For This Useful Post:

     AJL (05-23-2016),  dp (05-23-2016),  MatAust21 (05-29-2016),  Táltos (05-25-2016),  Torc Seanathair (05-25-2016)

  8. #5
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,194
    Sex
    Location
    Washington state
    Ethnicity
    European blend
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1a1a1a1 L664/YP5623
    mtDNA (M)
    U5b2b2/G228A

    United States of America European Union Norway United Kingdom Germany Imperial
    The way it looks to me, there was a general movement from New England and middle Atlantic states toward the south prior to the Revolutionary War. After that point in time, people then moved directly westward. So there are a lot of common ancestors up in yankee land.

  9. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Baltimore1937 For This Useful Post:

     AJL (05-24-2016),  PunjabiRajput (08-10-2016),  Táltos (05-25-2016)

  10. #6
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,573
    Sex
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Ethnicity
    Ger.-Brit.-Catalan-more
    Nationality
    (U.S.) American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-YP619*
    mtDNA (M)
    H1bg

    United Kingdom Germany Bayern Catalonia France Ireland Switzerland
    Okay, a quibble. Even so, please refrain from using "continental U.S." to mean "contiguous U.S." I realize a lot of folks may not be familiar with "contiguous" (connected, or touching).

    The problem with "Continental U.S." is that most people mean it to exclude Alaska, but it most certainly does not. If you're willing to take the time, you can walk to Alaska from Maine (or anywhere else in the "lower 48"). You can certainly drive, which many people have.

    The only thing separating Alaska from the rest of the U.S. is Canada, which is also part of North America, and there isn't some body of water separating Alaska and its beautiful neighbor.

    (I'm a former Alaskan, by the way, though I only lived there for three years as a child. But many Alaskans object to "continental U.S." as a term that excludes Alaska.)

    By the way, Maine is a beautiful state, too, but I'm afraid it's also not even the easternmost state of the "continental U.S." That's also Alaska, since part of the state is in the eastern hemisphere.
    Last edited by geebee; 05-24-2016 at 11:50 AM.
    Besides British-German-Catalan, ancestry includes smaller amounts of French, Irish, Swiss, Choctaw & another NA tribe, possibly Catawba. Avatar picture is: my father, his father, & his father's father; baby is my eldest brother.

    GB

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to geebee For This Useful Post:

     C J Wyatt III (05-24-2016)

  12. #7
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,573
    Sex
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Ethnicity
    Ger.-Brit.-Catalan-more
    Nationality
    (U.S.) American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-YP619*
    mtDNA (M)
    H1bg

    United Kingdom Germany Bayern Catalonia France Ireland Switzerland
    Now to speak more to the point, I have a Pennsylvania-born father and Mississippi-born mother, and my mother's family certainly kept closer track of kin than my father's did. I have more 1st cousins on my father's side, since he had 11 brothers and sisters. But for the most part these are all the ones who really have any contact with each other -- or perhaps there's some contact with 2nd cousins.

    On my mom's side, however, it isn't usually for people to be very aware of who many of their 3rd, 4th, and more distant cousins are.

    It seems odd to me in a way that my northern cousins seem to generally get more squicked out at the idea of marrying a cousin of any degree. But maybe that really isn't quite so strange, since it's actually impossible to marry a non-cousin. (They may not be a known cousin, but all humans are cousins in some degree.)

    On my mother's mother's side, in particular, there were several cousin marriages. No 1st cousins among my own ancestors, as far as I know, though one of my 4th great grandfathers married the daughter of one of his 1st cousins.

    I have one southern cousin who is related to me through three of his four grandparents, though on my side it's only through one. (My mother's family became considerably more exogamous beginning with my maternal grandmother's mother. However, that's only because I descend from my great grandmother's second husband. Her first husband was also her 2nd cousin.)
    Besides British-German-Catalan, ancestry includes smaller amounts of French, Irish, Swiss, Choctaw & another NA tribe, possibly Catawba. Avatar picture is: my father, his father, & his father's father; baby is my eldest brother.

    GB

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to geebee For This Useful Post:

     AJL (05-24-2016)

  14. #8
    Registered Users
    Posts
    791
    Sex
    Location
    Waterville, ME
    Ethnicity
    Great Migration Colonists
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U106 (S10415)
    mtDNA (M)
    J1c2g (FMS)
    Y-DNA (M)
    I1a-P109 (23andMe)
    mtDNA (P)
    T2b3 (23andMe)

    United States Gadsden England Scotland Ireland Wales
    According to the National Parks Service The Union had a population of 18.5 million while the Confederacy had had less than half the population (5.5 million free persons and 3.5 million slaves). I believe this further shows the higher ratio of (the smaller population) South doing DNA testing than the North.

  15. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Wing Genealogist For This Useful Post:

     AJL (05-24-2016),  AnnieD (05-25-2016)

  16. #9
    Registered Users
    Posts
    167
    Sex
    Location
    USA
    Ethnicity
    See flags below
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b->DF27->A7080
    mtDNA (M)
    H5a1f

    United States of America Germany Imperial Austrian Empire Germany Palatinate Scotland Switzerland
    I only have a few southerners in my matches and they all seem to have ties back to Mid-Atlantic / New England. I think your theory that more "Southerners" in genealogy is more a reflection on your ancestors.
    Last edited by thetick; 05-24-2016 at 11:56 PM.

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to thetick For This Useful Post:

     AJL (05-24-2016)

  18. #10
    Registered Users
    Posts
    893
    Sex
    Location
    USA
    Nationality
    USA
    Y-DNA (P)
    I-FT248579
    mtDNA (M)
    H5

    United States of America Canada
    Quote Originally Posted by thetick View Post
    I only have a few southerners and they all seem to have ties back to Mid-Atlantic / New England. I think your theory that more "Southerners" in genealogy is more a reflection on your ancestors.
    In my research, I am seeing some evidence that the male children of the breeders Mr. Green and Mr. Wilson when old enough were sold into seaman apprenticeships. I would guess that they were not too eager to go back to North Carolina where they grew up if they survived the apprenticeship ordeal. I think a lot of them ended up in New England and the Maritime Provinces where they could practice their trade. More times than not, I find a link from people in New England and Canada back to Mr. Green in early 18th century North Carolina.

    Jack

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 209
    Last Post: 07-28-2020, 12:01 PM
  2. Component atlantic: separate the north of the south
    By Tolan in forum Autosomal (auDNA)
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 07-17-2019, 09:24 PM
  3. What's the difference between Norway and Norway north?
    By firemonkey in forum Autosomal (auDNA)
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-04-2019, 06:24 PM
  4. Which DNA testing service is best for me(South Asian)?
    By Arlus in forum Inquiries Corner
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-16-2017, 11:16 AM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-23-2017, 02:51 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •