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Thread: Discerning Mosquitoes prefer type O blood "Tastier then others"

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    Discerning Mosquitoes prefer type O blood "Tastier then others"

    MOSQUITO MAGNETS: WHY MOSQUITOES FIND SOME PEOPLE TASTIER THAN OTHERS

    Does it seem like mosquitoes are always out to get you? Or are you one of the lucky ones who never seems to get bit while others seems to be eaten alive?

    It is not your imagination. As it turns out there are just some people who get bit more than others, while others seem to have a natural repellent of their own.

    On a hot summer morning, after a night of heavy downpours, Lupe Olivares wasn't worried much about bug spray as he entered the Houston Zoo for a day at the park with his family.

    "I don't know, I guess I'm not sweet enough or something," Olivares said. Though he wasn't sure why, Olivares said he just does not get bit. As it turns out, Olivares might be right.

    "We know that about 10 to 20 percent of people are bit more often than others and it's linked to a number of things," said Catherine Troisi, Ph.D. with UTHealth Public School of Health.

    Troisi is an infectious disease epidemiologist and specializes in the spread and outbreak of diseases. According to Troisi, about 85 percent of why people either do or do not get bit has to do with genetics, starting first with build and weight.

    People with more body mass breathe harder, in turn giving off more carbon dioxide --which is a gas mosquitoes are attracted to.

    "The more work you're doing, the heavier your breathing, so more carbon dioxide is coming out," Troisi said. "If you're a heavier person, you're working harder because you're carrying around more mass."

    Troisi said that is why pregnant women tend to get bit more. Other genetic factors include blood type.

    "There is some evidence that people with type O blood are bitten more often than people with other blood types," Troisi said.

    Researchers aren't sure of just why, though there is something in type O blood that is not a component in other blood types.

    Among others things that have been reported to attract mosquitoes, Troisi said anything that increases your body heat. That includes exercise and even drinking a beer, which raises body temperature.

    Chemicals on the skin unique to the person, like their sweat, can attract the skeeters. Bacteria also plays a role. Most people have more bacteria near their ankles and feet, where many tend to notice mosquito bites.

    Even a person's wardrobe might be attracting the buggers.

    "They not only use smell, they use sight to find their targets and so if you're wearing something that stands out, say red or black or something that's in sharp contrast with the environment, then they are more likely to find you," Troisi said.

    So, what does not attract mosquitoes? Troisi said that while anecdotally sweet-smelling body lotions and perfumes bring on the bites, it has never been proven to attract mosquitoes. As for sugary foods, Troisi said that will not make you any more tasty to the insects either.

    As for those people who seem not to get bit, Troisi said, "Some people have natural insect repellents --repellents that they exude."

    Research is being done to figure out more about those people and their body chemistry.

    No matter if you are the biting type or not, there are a few things you can do to prevent mosquito bites:
    -Drain standing water around your home where mosquitoes can breed
    -Dress in long sleeves and pants at night
    -Defend yourself with repellents with DEET or an all-natural solution like Lemon Eucalyptus Oil, proven to ward off buggers

    National Mosquito Control Awareness week is June 26 through July 2.

    http://abc7.com/health/why-mosquitoe...tible/1412786/

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to rock hunter For This Useful Post:

     Abd.H (07-05-2016),  Amerijoe (07-06-2016),  Little bit (07-06-2016),  MfA (07-04-2016),  Táltos (07-06-2016)

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    I'm O and overweight ... but I've never noticed getting bitten more than most. Must be something else about me that's repellent. Er, I mean, that mosquitoes don't like.
    Besides British-German-Catalan, ancestry includes smaller amounts of French, Irish, Swiss, Choctaw & another NA tribe, possibly Catawba. Avatar picture is: my father, his father, & his father's father; baby is my eldest brother.

    GB

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    I am O and all insects are drawn to me like a magnet. The deer flies are really fierce this summer. As for O blood, it is the most prevalent. So, maybe it simply sheer numbers weighing in to the equation?

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     Táltos (07-06-2016)

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    There is not that big of a difference between A and O, something like 5%, that it could not be adjusted for and its a 10 to 20% spread as well a vs o. One must assume they are ones trained in the art of statistics and know what they are doing. That being said, I am A and mosquitoes tend to avoid me if there are other people around but Colorado and Maine deer flies find me downright succulente.

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     Táltos (07-06-2016)

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    I have O type; mosquitoes certainly like me, but gnats and biting flies aren't far behind.

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    I am O , and mosquitoes like me indescribably .

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     Táltos (07-06-2016)

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    I'm O, and some nights they leave me alone. Other nights get the bug spray! So for me it's hit or miss.

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     Abd.H (07-06-2016)

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    Some friends have reported that taking Thiamine (Vitamin B1) supplement helped reduce mosquito attack.
    Not universally effective.

    Have not heard of using "Lemon Eucalyptus Oil" and I'm from the land of its origins, and my great grandmother swore by it for other uses, but not this one.

    The big mystery here is whether remedies apply to all of the different shapes and sizes we get.
    Early in the season there are giant mosquitoes. Then smaller, buzzy ones that wake you up in the middle of the night, but something in the sound makes it hard to work out where it is coming from. Later still come the small, silent ones that leave big welts. But at least you know the season is nearing its end.
    It used to be traditional here to have a bedstead that was high at the head end, so that a mosquito net could be hung from there.
    (Anyone else have those, maybe in Southern States?)
    Repellents, window screens and fashion have made them obsolete.

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    Rock hunter, you may right about type O. My wife is O and an extremely powerful mosquito magnet. I've joked with her for years that the only reason we're together because she keeps the mosquitos away from me. I'm AB and rarely get bitten and living in Florida to boot.

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    I'm type O and apparently delicious to mosquitoes whereas my A type husband seems to be less so. We react very differently to mosquito bites as well: I get insanely itchy, big red welts, and sometimes even have other allergic responses such as sneezing or minor asthma type symptoms. My husband seems not to react at all with no visual evidence of being bitten. I wonder if type O's are more reactive to mosquito bites making it seem like we get bitten more because we remember it more?

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