Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Mayflower DNA wiki

  1. #1
    Registered Users
    Posts
    656
    Sex
    Location
    Waterville, ME
    Ethnicity
    Great Migration Colonists
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U106 (S10415)
    mtDNA (M)
    J1c2g (FMS)
    Y-DNA (M)
    I1a-P109 (23andMe)
    mtDNA (P)
    T2b3 (23andMe)

    United States Gadsden England Scotland Ireland Wales

    Mayflower DNA wiki

    There is a fairly new wiki developed to work on identifying the DNA "signatures" of passengers and crew of The Mayflower. The wiki is located at: https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index....er_DNA_Project

    At the present time, the site is still needing more volunteers to help establish pages for each of the passengers. I am the coordinator for the Howland pages https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index....owland_(Y-DNA) and https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index....Tilley_(mtDNA)

    I have also developed a private online database showing the Y-DNA descent from John Howland and the mtDNA descent from Elizabeth Tilley. Persons interested in accessing this database can contact me: wing_genealogist AT Yahoo DOT com

    Ray

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Wing Genealogist For This Useful Post:

     AJL (07-18-2016),  AnnieD (07-20-2016),  Piquerobi (09-24-2016),  Rick (07-17-2016)

  3. #2
    Registered Users
    Posts
    656
    Sex
    Location
    Waterville, ME
    Ethnicity
    Great Migration Colonists
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U106 (S10415)
    mtDNA (M)
    J1c2g (FMS)
    Y-DNA (M)
    I1a-P109 (23andMe)
    mtDNA (P)
    T2b3 (23andMe)

    United States Gadsden England Scotland Ireland Wales
    For Y-DNA, this project plans on using Y-Elite 2.1 testing of Y-DNA descendants of Mayflower passengers and other related individuals. On average (from Y Elite 1 and 2 testing) we are finding a SNP mutation roughly every three generations. Most living Mayflower Descendants today are roughly 12-16 generations removed from the Mayflower passenger, so their should be plenty of opportunities to find mutations. This level of testing will discern between descendants of Mayflower passengers from descendants of siblings of Mayflower Passengers. This is helpful for families like Howland and Winslow (and possibly others) where siblings also settled in Massachusetts.

    While it is unlikely to identify a mutation occurring within a Mayflower passenger, we will be able to see a series of mutations which discern descendants of a passenger from descendants of a passenger's siblings.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Wing Genealogist For This Useful Post:

     Rick (07-17-2016)

  5. #3
    Registered Users
    Posts
    656
    Sex
    Location
    Waterville, ME
    Ethnicity
    Great Migration Colonists
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U106 (S10415)
    mtDNA (M)
    J1c2g (FMS)
    Y-DNA (M)
    I1a-P109 (23andMe)
    mtDNA (P)
    T2b3 (23andMe)

    United States Gadsden England Scotland Ireland Wales
    To be open and transparent, the Administrator of this project is Greg Magoon, who is a consultant for Full Genomes Corp. However, he does not make any money off of this endeavor and has spent over $2,000 of his money (so far) on this project.

  6. #4
    Registered Users
    Posts
    65
    Sex
    Location
    Ohio
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-DF27>Z225

    United States Gadsden
    cool project. I don't have ydna or mtdna Mayflower lines, but have 6-9 autosomal lines (depending on how one counts 1st gen marriages between passengers, children of passengers, etc.). I find it interesting that 72 years after its planting "the old colony" still had a population of only a few thousand when it was absorbed into Masachusetts Bay colony. I find the same surnames over and over there in the former Plymouth colony,which might make for an interesting autosomal project, too.

  7. #5
    Registered Users
    Posts
    656
    Sex
    Location
    Waterville, ME
    Ethnicity
    Great Migration Colonists
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U106 (S10415)
    mtDNA (M)
    J1c2g (FMS)
    Y-DNA (M)
    I1a-P109 (23andMe)
    mtDNA (P)
    T2b3 (23andMe)

    United States Gadsden England Scotland Ireland Wales
    The project is looking to explore whether/how autosomal DNA can be used. However, the random nature of mutations is such that after a small number of generations (I believe roughly 4-6 generations) an individual no longer shares any DNA from some of their ancestors. Given the fact most individuals living today are roughly 12-16 generations removed from their Mayflower passenger(s) it is likely most folks will have no autosomal DNA inherited from their Mayflower ancestor.

    In addition, do to the endogamy of the population, even if you find out you share autosomal DNA with another living individual who descends from the same Mayflower passenger you do, this would not automatically mean this shared DNA must have come from the Mayflower passenger. It is much more likely you share multiple ancestors with your match, and your shared DNA could come from any of those matches.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Wing Genealogist For This Useful Post:

     AnnieD (07-20-2016),  Rick (07-17-2016)

  9. #6
    Registered Users
    Posts
    65
    Sex
    Location
    Ohio
    Y-DNA (P)
    R-DF27>Z225

    United States Gadsden
    You are correct. I mentioned the small population of Plymouth Colony though because it seems the dozen or so towns of Plymouth were settled in a deliberate manner by a relatively small population, Mayflower descendants among others, which intermarried often over the generations. In my own genealogical and historical research I've found this pattern down my mothers ancestral lines there. So, I wasn't interested so much in the Mayflower aspect per se, though it may apply to those lines that remained in old Plymouth. Rather,I was speculating that there may be a Plymouth colony autosomal signature, distinguishable perhaps even from the rest of Massachusetts. This is merely speculation based on the existence of such a small population for a fair number of generations.

  10. #7
    Registered Users
    Posts
    656
    Sex
    Location
    Waterville, ME
    Ethnicity
    Great Migration Colonists
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U106 (S10415)
    mtDNA (M)
    J1c2g (FMS)
    Y-DNA (M)
    I1a-P109 (23andMe)
    mtDNA (P)
    T2b3 (23andMe)

    United States Gadsden England Scotland Ireland Wales
    This Wiki has received its first Y-Elite result, for a Y-DNA descendant of Francis Eaton. More information can be found at: https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index....=Eaton_(Y-DNA)

    This project is also pending results for a Y-DNA descendant of Henry Howland, brother to pilgrim John Howland. A descendant of pilgrim John had previously taken a Big Y test, so this Y-Elite test will help us narrow down which SNPs belong to which brother. I happen to be a close Y-DNA match to this Howland family and I am also pending a Y-Elite test. My test result will also help weed out SNPs which are ancestral to the Howland family. More information about the Howland family can be found at: https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index....owland_(Y-DNA)

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Wing Genealogist For This Useful Post:

     Dewsloth (09-19-2016)

  12. #8
    Registered Users
    Posts
    560
    Location
    Brazil
    Nationality
    Brazilian

    Brazil
    It looks like I1 and R1b-U106 were among the most common among the Mayflower settlers, which means they went from the most Germanic influenced parts of England:

    https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php?title=Y-DNA

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Piquerobi For This Useful Post:

     Wing Genealogist (09-24-2016)

  14. #9
    Registered Users
    Posts
    656
    Sex
    Location
    Waterville, ME
    Ethnicity
    Great Migration Colonists
    Nationality
    American
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1b-U106 (S10415)
    mtDNA (M)
    J1c2g (FMS)
    Y-DNA (M)
    I1a-P109 (23andMe)
    mtDNA (P)
    T2b3 (23andMe)

    United States Gadsden England Scotland Ireland Wales
    Quote Originally Posted by Piquerobi View Post
    It looks like I1 and R1b-U106 were among the most common among the Mayflower settlers, which means they went from the most Germanic influenced parts of England:

    https://mayflowerdna.org/wiki/index.php?title=Y-DNA
    Interesting angle, but I believe we still have too few Mayflower families adequately Y-DNA tested, so the law of small numbers apply (and the results thus far can be very different than the "true" results once we have much more data).

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Wing Genealogist For This Useful Post:

     Piquerobi (09-25-2016)

  16. #10
    Junior Member
    Posts
    3
    Sex

    Interesting.. I live in Plymouth, MA and know many Brewsters.. and others who are part of the originals.. My family history has long claimed that we were descended from the Navigator on the mayflower. John Clark(e) .. is this part of the project or it looks like it is limited to the Howlands..

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Mayflower DNA forum (under Genealogy)
    By Wing Genealogist in forum Suggestions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-17-2016, 01:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •