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Thread: Correlation of R1b with mt DNA H? autosomal DNA?

  1. #61
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    This may be a topic for another thread, since this one is already kind of long, but what about lactase persistence? It certainly seems that lactase persistence would come in handy for pastoralist populations and would just naturally tend to come to be prevalent in them. Take a look at a map of the most common LP gene among Eurasians, C/T 13910:

    http://pastmist.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/lp1.jpg

    It's obviously at its most frequent in R1b-rich environments.

    I hesitate to mention this (because I am still kind of sick to death of the whole "Indo-European" thing), but weren't the Indo-Europeans - if there ever were such a people - supposed to be big-time pastoralists? If so, why is LP so obviously wimpy in the Pontic-Caspian Urheimat and on down into India?
    Last edited by rms2; 06-12-2013 at 11:36 AM.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by rms2 View Post
    This may be a topic for another thread, since this one is already kind of long, but what about lactase persistence? It certainly seems that lactase persistence would come in handy for pastoralist populations and would just naturally tend to come to be prevalent in them. Take a look at a map of the most common LP gene among Eurasians, C/T 13910:

    http://pastmist.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/lp1.jpg

    It's obviously at its most frequent in R1b-rich environments.

    I hesitate to mention this (because I am still kind of sick to death of the whole "Indo-European" thing), but weren't the Indo-Europeans - if there ever were such a people - supposed to be big-time pastoralists? If so, why is LP so obviously wimpy in the Pontic-Caspian Urheimat and on down into India?
    I think this a good thread to catalog these kinds of things. Some do or must overlap.

    ... and there is some kind of correlation between R1b-L11 and lactose persistence at least when you look at Western and Northern Europe.

    I've seen this before but this is the first time I noticed two things.
    1) About at Austria/Slovakia, there is a lactose persistence higher yellowish frequency hotspot amidst the lower frequency green in Central Europe.
    2) The Fertile Crescent is almost replicated by the blue swoop of very low frequency lactose persistence.

    I think one concern about how we often think about the Indo-Europeans is that they were "one" people speaking a common language. By definition, PIE was a common language (last time it was so) but that doesn't mean all PIE speakers were of a single culture. Also early adopters of IE speaking or those around the edges may definitely have been different. David Anthony would not call the Yamnaya a culture, but an horizon because it wasn't really one culture, one tribe or one nation. It was a multitude with some interconnection/exchange.
    Last edited by TigerMW; 06-12-2013 at 07:02 PM.

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by rms2 View Post
    This may be a topic for another thread, since this one is already kind of long, but what about lactase persistence? It certainly seems that lactase persistence would come in handy for pastoralist populations and would just naturally tend to come to be prevalent in them. Take a look at a map of the most common LP gene among Eurasians, C/T 13910:

    http://pastmist.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/lp1.jpg

    It's obviously at its most frequent in R1b-rich environments.

    I hesitate to mention this (because I am still kind of sick to death of the whole "Indo-European" thing), but weren't the Indo-Europeans - if there ever were such a people - supposed to be big-time pastoralists? If so, why is LP so obviously wimpy in the Pontic-Caspian Urheimat and on down into India?
    Who is this obvious to? That is just one mutation. 22018A is probably more common than 13910T in Asia. Not to mention the likely local mutations that only exist in Asia. Of course this doesn't account for the likely bottleneck that occured in NW Europe. That R1b relationship doesn't apply to West Asia or the Balkans anyways.

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