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Thread: Genetic Genealogy & Ancient DNA in the News (DISCUSSION ONLY)

  1. #1911
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    Quote Originally Posted by Romilius View Post
    I think that's what both of them wish: that politics has to be taken out of science.

    My ancestors died en masse during WWI and also WWII... but those who fought in 1915 had different leaders and different ideals than those who fought in 1939 and even different than those who fought in 1945: we were at least 50 male members on direct paternal line (same surname), more or less tied between us (cousins, double cousins, et cetera). After WWI and WWII we were only 12. And, if the World will go towards another war (more than 70 years of peace in Europe is a lot for a Continent that has been nearly always at war for millennia... Sad to say, but I'm not quiet about our future), those who will fight will have different ideals than us. Culture can change, but human beings are, at the end of the story, the same every century.
    Thanks for being sensible, while others are not. I respect your comment and also your ancestors.
    To Dorkyman, you telling me to "leave the continent if you are not satisfied" is exactly the same response racist xenophobes tell immigrants, when they tell them to leave. I was stating that I was concerned for the future of genetics, if politics gets a free hand in obfuscating the facts. Please calm down. And I ain't going anywhere.
    Last edited by Hando; 02-01-2019 at 06:44 PM.

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  3. #1912
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    This may be of interest for people in California:

    https://events.stanford.edu/events/823/82317/

    A 12,000-year Genetic History of Rome and the Italian Peninsula

    Wednesday, February 6, 2019

    12:00 pm

    Archaeology Center

    Sponsored by:
    Archaeology Center

    Ancient DNA has become a powerful tool for studying the human past. This talk highlights our team’s multidisciplinary approach to analyzing new genomic evidence from Rome and the Italian Peninsula in the context of the extensive archaeological and historical record of the region. We have built a time series of 134 ancient genomes that spans the last 12,000 years, from the Upper Paleolithic to the present, allowing us to present a contextually-situated discussion of genomic changes through time. This approach allows us to study changes ranging from individual traits of interest, such as lactase persistence, to broad population-level shifts. We see evidence that as Rome grew from a small city to an empire encompassing the entirety of the Mediterranean - or Mare Nostrum, ‘our sea’, as the Romans called it - and beyond, the city of Rome became a mosaic of inhabitants from across the empire and remained so even after the fragmentation of the Western Roman Empire. I will illustrate these general trends with case studies, such as paleogenomic data from Isola Sacra, the necropolis for the port towns of Ostia and Portus, in which contextualizing archaeological and textual evidence have been instrumental in understanding the genetic structure of the Roman population in our study.

    Hannah Moots is a PhD Candidate in the Stanford Archaeology Center and the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. Her research draws on bioarchaeological, paleoenvironmental and genomic lines of evidence to investigate connections between environmental change and human health. Her work examines the recursive relationship biological and cultural changes - such as pathogen burden, mobility patterns, and dietary shifts that came about in the Neolithic transition. She holds an MPhil in Archaeological Science from the University of Cambridge and her past research includes an archaeogenetic analysis of the dispersal of several domesticated crops, including taro (Colocasia esculenta) and broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum), and a paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the aridification of the Saharan Desert over the last 5,000 years at Gobero.

    When:
    Wednesday, February 6, 2019
    12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    Where:
    Archaeology Center
    Tags:


    Audience:
    General Public, Faculty/Staff, Students, Alumni/Friends

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  5. #1913
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    Quote Originally Posted by rozenfeld View Post
    This may be of interest for people in California:

    https://events.stanford.edu/events/823/82317/

    A 12,000-year Genetic History of Rome and the Italian Peninsula

    Wednesday, February 6, 2019

    12:00 pm

    Archaeology Center

    Sponsored by:
    Archaeology Center

    Ancient DNA has become a powerful tool for studying the human past. This talk highlights our team’s multidisciplinary approach to analyzing new genomic evidence from Rome and the Italian Peninsula in the context of the extensive archaeological and historical record of the region. We have built a time series of 134 ancient genomes that spans the last 12,000 years, from the Upper Paleolithic to the present, allowing us to present a contextually-situated discussion of genomic changes through time. This approach allows us to study changes ranging from individual traits of interest, such as lactase persistence, to broad population-level shifts. We see evidence that as Rome grew from a small city to an empire encompassing the entirety of the Mediterranean - or Mare Nostrum, ‘our sea’, as the Romans called it - and beyond, the city of Rome became a mosaic of inhabitants from across the empire and remained so even after the fragmentation of the Western Roman Empire. I will illustrate these general trends with case studies, such as paleogenomic data from Isola Sacra, the necropolis for the port towns of Ostia and Portus, in which contextualizing archaeological and textual evidence have been instrumental in understanding the genetic structure of the Roman population in our study.

    Hannah Moots is a PhD Candidate in the Stanford Archaeology Center and the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. Her research draws on bioarchaeological, paleoenvironmental and genomic lines of evidence to investigate connections between environmental change and human health. Her work examines the recursive relationship biological and cultural changes - such as pathogen burden, mobility patterns, and dietary shifts that came about in the Neolithic transition. She holds an MPhil in Archaeological Science from the University of Cambridge and her past research includes an archaeogenetic analysis of the dispersal of several domesticated crops, including taro (Colocasia esculenta) and broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum), and a paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the aridification of the Saharan Desert over the last 5,000 years at Gobero.

    When:
    Wednesday, February 6, 2019
    12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    Where:
    Archaeology Center
    Tags:


    Audience:
    General Public, Faculty/Staff, Students, Alumni/Friends
    Whoa! That could be a biggy!

    I can think of at least one person who has staked a great deal on what came into and went out of the Italian peninsula.
     


    Hidden Content


    Y-DNA: R1b-FGC36981 (L21> DF13> Z39589> CTS2501> Z43690> Y8426> BY160> FGC36974>FGC36982 >FGC36981)

    Additional Data:
    Lactase Persistent:
    rs4988235 AA (13910 TT)
    rs182549 TT (22018 AA)

    Red Hair Carrier:
    Arg160Trp+ (rs1805008 T) aka R160W

    Dad's mtDNA: K1a1

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  7. #1914
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    Quote Originally Posted by rms2 View Post
    Heber posted the following link over in the Genetic Genealogy and Ancient DNA in the News thread:

    https://culturologies.wordpress.com/...ew-york-times/

    I found it (though the author of the blog post defends Reich) and the recent reaction to David Reich kind of ominous for the future of ancient DNA testing, especially where it concerns European prehistory.

    Blather like this tweet would be funny if it didn't actually threaten to bring the hobnailed boot of ideological purity down on the neck of ancient DNA research.



    Look at the diversity machinery operating at most universities today, at least in North America. Imagine ancient DNA research having to pass its Byzantine scrutiny, even to the point of the insertion of diversity commissars in the field and in the laboratory.
    Good God, I hope not.

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  9. #1915
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    Quote Originally Posted by rozenfeld View Post
    This may be of interest for people in California:

    https://events.stanford.edu/events/823/82317/

    A 12,000-year Genetic History of Rome and the Italian Peninsula

    Wednesday, February 6, 2019

    12:00 pm

    Archaeology Center

    Sponsored by:
    Archaeology Center

    Ancient DNA has become a powerful tool for studying the human past. This talk highlights our team’s multidisciplinary approach to analyzing new genomic evidence from Rome and the Italian Peninsula in the context of the extensive archaeological and historical record of the region. We have built a time series of 134 ancient genomes that spans the last 12,000 years, from the Upper Paleolithic to the present, allowing us to present a contextually-situated discussion of genomic changes through time. This approach allows us to study changes ranging from individual traits of interest, such as lactase persistence, to broad population-level shifts. We see evidence that as Rome grew from a small city to an empire encompassing the entirety of the Mediterranean - or Mare Nostrum, ‘our sea’, as the Romans called it - and beyond, the city of Rome became a mosaic of inhabitants from across the empire and remained so even after the fragmentation of the Western Roman Empire. I will illustrate these general trends with case studies, such as paleogenomic data from Isola Sacra, the necropolis for the port towns of Ostia and Portus, in which contextualizing archaeological and textual evidence have been instrumental in understanding the genetic structure of the Roman population in our study.

    Hannah Moots is a PhD Candidate in the Stanford Archaeology Center and the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. Her research draws on bioarchaeological, paleoenvironmental and genomic lines of evidence to investigate connections between environmental change and human health. Her work examines the recursive relationship biological and cultural changes - such as pathogen burden, mobility patterns, and dietary shifts that came about in the Neolithic transition. She holds an MPhil in Archaeological Science from the University of Cambridge and her past research includes an archaeogenetic analysis of the dispersal of several domesticated crops, including taro (Colocasia esculenta) and broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum), and a paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the aridification of the Saharan Desert over the last 5,000 years at Gobero.

    When:
    Wednesday, February 6, 2019
    12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    Where:
    Archaeology Center
    Tags:


    Audience:
    General Public, Faculty/Staff, Students, Alumni/Friends
    I will be going to this event and reporting on the main points of her presentation.
    Quoted from this Forum:

    "Which superman haplogroup is the toughest - R1a or R1b? And which SNP mutation spoke Indo-European first? There's only one way for us to find out ... fight!"

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  11. #1916
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryukendo View Post
    I will be going to this event and reporting on the main points of her presentation.
    Check out my Hidden Content
    My Y-DNA: Q-M242 -> Q-L232 -> Q-L275 -> Q-M378 -> Q-Y2016 -> Q-L245 -> Q-FGC1904 -> Q-Y2209 -> Q-Y2225 -> Q-Y2197 -> Q-Y2750 -> Q-YP1004 -> Q-YP3924;
    My mtDNA: K1a1b1a;

    My dad's mtDNA: K2a2a;

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    Plans to study Visigothic remains in Spain, but it may take years: https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/01/29...65_273108.html

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  15. #1918
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    I have recently found this:

    https://bib.irb.hr/prikazi-rad?&lang=EN&rad=981084

    Bibliographic record number: 981084
    Journal

    Authors: Novak, Mario
    Title: Different, yet similar: a multidisciplinary analysis of three individuals from the Great Migration Period from Osijek, eastern Croatia
    Source:
    Meeting: 5th International Conference of Mediaeval Archaeology – Life and death in mediaeval and early modern times
    Location and date: Zagreb, 6.-7.6.2018.
    Keywords: early medieval period ; Croatia ; Osijek ; artificial cranial deformation
    Abstract:
    The paper presents the results of the multidisciplinary analysis of the remains belonging to the three individuals dated to the Great Migration Period (5th c. CE) from Osijek in eastern Croatia. Based on the archaeological context, radiocarbon dates and ancient DNA analysis it is possible that the studied individuals were of Asian, possibly Hunnish origin. The partially preserved skeletons were deposited within a circular pit filled with animal bones and pottery fragments. The skeletal remains belonged to three adolescents between 12 and 16 years old, two of whom exhibited intentional artificial cranial deformation. A comprehensive bioarchaeological analysis and CT imaging suggest the use of two different types of artificial deformation: the circular erect and tabular oblique type. While this phenomenon has been observed in various ancient populations, its origins and purpose are still not fully understood. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes analysis performed on two individuals with artificial cranial deformation showed high δ13C values (−17.0‰ and −15.5‰) and very similar δ15N values (9.5‰ and 9.9‰) suggesting a mixed terrestrial C3/C4 diet with a heavy reliance on resources such as millet. Ancient DNA analysis revealed that all individuals are males, as assessed by chromosome ratios. Individual SU 259 shows Asian ancestry on the PCA which is also supported by the estimated mitochondrial haplogroup F1b. The estimated mitochondrial haplogroups of the individuals SU 261 and 750 are H1 and H5, and they cluster around individuals from the Near/Middle East and the Caucasus. The results obtained by this study revealed new, previously unknown, information on lifestyle and biological characteristics of people inhabiting the Pannonian Basin during the 5th century.
    Type of meeting: Predavanje
    Type of presentation in a journal: Not published
    Type of peer-review: Domestic peer-review
    Original language: ENG
    Category: Znanstveni
    Research fields:
    Archeology
    Contrib. to CROSBI by: Mario Novak (mario.novak@inantro.hr), 23. Sij. 2019. u 09:44 sati

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  17. #1919
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryukendo View Post
    I will be going to this event and reporting on the main points of her presentation.
    Don't miss the part about the Etruscans whatever happens. No toilet breaks. Take a plastic bag with you if you have to.

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  19. #1920
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    Quote Originally Posted by Generalissimo View Post
    Don't miss the part about the Etruscans whatever happens. No toilet breaks. Take a plastic bag with you if you have to.
    Quoted from this Forum:

    "Which superman haplogroup is the toughest - R1a or R1b? And which SNP mutation spoke Indo-European first? There's only one way for us to find out ... fight!"

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