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Thread: Farming, Ælla & Ivar, North Sea Networks and Estonia.

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    Farming, Ælla & Ivar, North Sea Networks and Estonia.

    Some papers of possible interest:



    The Introduction of farming in Northern Europe
    T. Douglas Price

    Northern Europe is defined for this essay as the classic area of Scandinavia - the countries of Denmark, Sweden and Norway.

    https://www.academia.edu/27736430/Th...orthern_Europe





    Ælla and the Descendants of Ivar: Politics and Legend in the Viking Age.
    Neil McGuigan

    https://www.academia.edu/10247408/Æl...the_Viking_Age





    North Sea Networks: Trade and Communication from the Seventh to the Tenth Century.
    Daniel Melleno


    Abstract: This article explores the commercial links that bound together the peoples of the North Sea from the seventh to the tenth century. At the heart of this trade lay Frisia, whose location as the cross roads between the North Sea and the heart of the Frankish Empire allowed Frisian, Frankish, and Scandinavian merchants to carry goods back and forth across the North Sea while at the same time facilitating the movement of ideas and cultural exchange. Annalists gathered information from these merchants, kings used them to pass messages back and forth, and missionaries traveled with them. By tracing the physical and textual evidence of merchants’ travels between foreign worlds, this article demonstrates that the steady growth of economic activity in the North Sea facilitated contact and communication between Francia and Scandinavia well before the first major Viking attacks on the Frankish empire in the 830s.


    https://www.academia.edu/8271860/Nor..._Tenth_Century





    Isotopic provenancing of the Salme ship burials in Pre-Viking Age Estonia
    T. Douglas Price, Jüri Peets, Raili Allmäe, Liina Maldre and Ester Oras


    Attachment 11211


    Ship burials are a well-known feature of Scandinavian Viking Age archaeology, but the discovery of 41 individuals buried in two ships in Estonia belongs to the Pre-Viking period and is the first of its kind in Europe. The two crews met a violent end around AD 750, and were buried with a variety of richly decorated weapons, tools, gaming pieces and animal bones. The rich grave goods suggest that this was a diplomatic delegation protected by a cohort of elite warriors. They were armed with swords of Scandinavian design, possibly from the Stockholm-Ma ̈laren region, and stable isotope analysis is consistent with that being the probable homeland of the crew.



    https://www.academia.edu/27175469/Is...ng_Age_Estonia
    Last edited by JMcB; 08-27-2016 at 08:16 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JMcB View Post
    The Introduction of farming in Northern Europe
    T. Douglas Price
    This is from 2000 and therefore too outdated to bother with, I'd say.

    Ælla and the Descendants of Ivar: Politics and Legend in the Viking Age.
    Neil McGuigan
    Have placed it in the Vault, thanks.

    North Sea Networks: Trade and Communication from the Seventh to the Tenth Century.
    Daniel Melleno
    Will place it in the Vault, thanks.

    Isotopic provenancing of the Salme ship burials in Pre-Viking Age Estonia
    T. Douglas Price, et al.
    I have this in my own collection, but did not dare to place it in the Vault, even though freely available on academia.edu, because the journal Antiquity is very stringent re copyright. The article is from 2016.

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    The Introduction of farming in Northern Europe
    T. Douglas Price

    [QUOTE=Jean M;]. This is from 2000 and therefore too outdated to bother with, I'd say.



    Hello Jean,

    Thank you for you input, that's good to know. Having not yet read it, I'll scratch that one from my list. Do you know of any other papers that deal with Scandinavia? Anything from introduction of farming down to the Jastorf culture would be of interest.

    Regards,
    John
    Last edited by JMcB; 08-27-2016 at 05:49 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JMcB View Post
    Hello Jean,

    Thank you for you input, that's good to know. Having not yet read it, I'll scratch that one from my list. Do you know of any other papers that deal with Scandinavia? Anything from introduction of farming down to the Jastorf culture would be of interest.
    Lasse Sørensen and Sabine Karg, The expansion of agrarian societies towards the north – new evidence for agriculture during the Mesolithic/Neolithic transition in Southern Scandinavia, Journal of Archaeological Science, Volume 51, November 2014, Pages 98–114 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...05440312003962 This is behind a paywall, but if you Google on the title of the paper, you will find it at ResearchGate and academia.edu

    Radiocarbon dates on new evidence of agriculture in Southern Scandinavia document the introduction of domesticated animals and cereal cultivation during the period 4000–3700 cal BC. The speed of the expansion was so rapid that smaller groups of pioneering farmers from Central Europe must have been involved in this process. These farmers cleared the forest and settled on inland sites. For reasons of poor preservation conditions for organic finds, bioarchaeological evidence from these inland sites is rare. However, the small amounts of available evidence clearly points to a dominating agrarian subsistence supplemented by hunting and fishing. Furthermore, the distribution of archaeological stray finds, such as pointed butted flint axes, is in certain cases located around easy accessible inland flint mines, where pioneering farmers settled on easily-workable arable soils.

    Evidence from contemporaneous coastal and lake shore sites show, on the other hand, a slow and gradual process of change towards agrarian subsistence, thus supporting the availability model. Our results support the theory of cultural dualism, assuming the migration of smaller groups of farmers from Central Europe. The transition towards an agrarian way of life probably happened during a complex and continuous process of migration, integration and gradual assimilation between pioneering farmers and local hunter–gatherers.
    A nicely balanced paper and pretty up to date.
    Last edited by Jean M; 08-27-2016 at 06:11 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jean M View Post
    Lasse Sørensen and Sabine Karg, The expansion of agrarian societies towards the north – new evidence for agriculture during the Mesolithic/Neolithic transition in Southern Scandinavia, Journal of Archaeological Science, Volume 51, November 2014, Pages 98–114 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...05440312003962 This is behind a paywall, but if you Google on the title of the paper, you will find it at ResearchGate and academia.edu

    A nicely balanced paper and pretty up to date.
    Excellent and thank you! That'll fill the gap.

    Now all I have to do, is read the papers as fast as I find them. ;-)

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    I have this in my own collection, but did not dare to place it in the Vault, even though freely available on academia.edu, because the journal Antiquity is very stringent re copyright. The article is from 2016.[/QUOTE = Jean M;]

    In light of the above, do you think I should remove the link?
    Last edited by JMcB; 08-27-2016 at 07:17 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JMcB View Post
    In light of the above, do you think I should remove the link?
    I have no idea. Best check the forum rules I suppose.

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