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Thread: Psychics and psychosis - hearing voices with different outcomes

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    Psychics and psychosis - hearing voices with different outcomes

    I found this interesting for a couple reasons: One, is I've always been extremely skeptical of people who claim to be psychics but this makes me rethink my assessment. Perhaps they aren't channelling the dead, per se, but they are hearing something which is more than I suspected was happening. Secondly, could severe mental illness come down to negative thinking? Here's what they found:

    Psychics help psychiatrists understand the voices of psychosis

    People with psychosis are tormented by internal voices. In an effort to explain why a Yale team enlisted help from an unusual source: psychics and others who hear voices but are not diagnosed with a mental illness.

    They found that the voices experienced by this group are similar in many ways to those reported by people with schizophrenia, with a few big differences: Psychics are much more likely to perceive the voices as positive or helpful and as experiences that can be controlled, according to a new study published Sept. 28 in the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin...

    ...Powers and Philip Corlett, assistant professor of psychiatry and senior author on the paper along with Yale neuroscience graduate student Megan Kelley, studied a group called clairaudient psychics, who report receiving daily auditory messages. The subjects who reported hearing voices were given tests from forensic psychiatry designed to identify those who falsely claim to be hearing voices in order to avoid criminal prosecution. Both psychics and psychosis patients had similar scores on tests meant to detect false claims of hearing voices. However, patients with schizophrenia were much more likely to report negative experiences when hearing voices or discussing the voices with other people.
    By comparing the psychics' experiences with those of people with schizophrenia and a control group of healthy subjects, the authors claim to have found some clues as to what may be protecting this group of healthy voice-hearers.
    "These individuals have a much higher degree of control over the voices. They also have a greater willingness to engage with and view the voices as positive or neutral to their lives,'' Corlett said. "We predict this population will teach us a lot about the neurobiology, cognitive psychology and eventually treatment of distressing voices."
    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-0...psychosis.html

    Interesting stuff!
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    An easier diagnosis for most (IMO) is attention seeking, money scamming BS. I keep an open mind to different claims but just like a magician..when you see the trick laid out there is no mystery..no paranormal activity it's just a good trick. I doubt most hear voices..they're just scammers.

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    You're probably right and I'll continue to be skeptical, frankly. One thing of interest, though: My grandmother was bipolar/schizophrenic since her 20's, never formally diagnosed until old age when they said she had alzheimer's (no, she was end stage mental illness) and suffered auditory and visual hallucinations. No attention seeking, btw, in fact she was nearly a hermit for all the years I knew her. I told my mom about this study and she said that when she was younger, my grandma claimed to have psychic abilities such as being able to know what her brother was thinking and her brother felt he could read my grandma's mind, too. He died at 21 and there was hints of mental illness for him, too. In any case, I wonder if many people who go on to develop mental illness have a period of time when they claim to be psychic? Hmmmm...? Could it be hyper-mentalism, theory of mind gone too far?
    Last edited by Little bit; 09-28-2016 at 05:00 PM.
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    What a horrible thing to be living with.

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    Thanks for the sentiments. It WAS horrible, my grandmother suffered terribly, both physically and mentally. At the end, it almost seemed like a wasted life though she may have had a better outcome if she received treatment. I grew up with my grandparents, living in their house, so I was there for a lot of the worst years. She was erratic and could be violent but I knew how to stay clear of her and oddly, I never thought much of it at the time. Years later, I came to realize how most people don't have to deal with these things. My grandmother was suspicious of airplanes and helicopters, believing they were spying on her, and more than once the police were called to the house because my grandma would accuse my grandfather of trying to kill her (he wasn't unless you considered toxic co-dependency killing her, which is actually debatable.) It's just bad all around. My grandmother passed away a year and half ago, cutting us all off at the end due to her paranoia, and we're struggling to forgive, mourn, and come to terms. But that's not the end. Her sister was bipolar with a bad ending, she had kids; One of the granddaughters, my cousin, is bipolar/BPD. Another of my grandmother's sisters was not mentally ill but two of her three kids were, one who committed suicide last year. For me, mental illness is personal though at 47, I think I have been spared. But I have two kids.
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    1) The issue is not whether psychics have the powers they claim to have, but how they experience voices compared to people who are dxed with psychosis/schizophrenia.

    2) Psychosis/schizophrenia is about much more than just delusions and hallucinations. The biggest negative effect on occupational and social functioning etc coming from the cognitive and negative symptoms.

    Those who have predominantly negative symptoms tend to do worse than others with psychosis/schizophrenia.

    There does seem to have been a trend in some quarters to reduce psychosis/schizophrenia down to more dramatic but less disabling symptoms like hallucinations. This often coming from those who reject the medical model ,and often have serious doubts about the existence of mental illness.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little bit View Post
    Thanks for the sentiments. It WAS horrible, my grandmother suffered terribly, both physically and mentally. At the end, it almost seemed like a wasted life though she may have had a better outcome if she received treatment. I grew up with my grandparents, living in their house, so I was there for a lot of the worst years. She was erratic and could be violent but I knew how to stay clear of her and oddly, I never thought much of it at the time. Years later, I came to realize how most people don't have to deal with these things. My grandmother was suspicious of airplanes and helicopters, believing they were spying on her, and more than once the police were called to the house because my grandma would accuse my grandfather of trying to kill her (he wasn't unless you considered toxic co-dependency killing her, which is actually debatable.) It's just bad all around. My grandmother passed away a year and half ago, cutting us all off at the end due to her paranoia, and we're struggling to forgive, mourn, and come to terms. But that's not the end. Her sister was bipolar with a bad ending, she had kids; One of the granddaughters, my cousin, is bipolar/BPD. Another of my grandmother's sisters was not mentally ill but two of her three kids were, one who committed suicide last year. For me, mental illness is personal though at 47, I think I have been spared. But I have two kids.
    Good thing she wasn't around to read the Snowden documents and say "I told you so!" Sorry..not to make light of a serious issue but I can see how from your perspective it would be difficult to deal with (and troubling).

    What is difficult to sort through sometimes is.."what is a rational and legitimate concern" and what is a mental health issue. I think sometimes people are quick to categorize a persons "paranoia" as a mental health issue when in fact it may be legitimate. I remember almost 10 years ago when the computer cameras started becoming popular and I covered mine (and later laptop version) with tape and people accused me of being paranoid. Now the director of the FBI is saying he does the same thing as a matter of precaution. So I guess it depends on who and how the person has been diagnosed.

    I'm always pretty "easy going" with any paranoia people may have (some is very humorous)..until it starts leading to some sort of violent or implosive antisocial behavior.

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    Yes! One is not really paranoid if they actually are out to get you. (lol)...

    I have known a few voice hearers and only one I would assume to be Schizophrenic. The other two are actually (aside from this one symptom as peculiar as it may seem) appear to be otherwise quite functional and can carry astute and intelligent conversation and make quite rational choices. I believe it would be a terrible error to try and convince them they are mad and stick them on totally ineffective and quite dangerous psychotropic drugs. Thee after all rarely if ever have any effect on stopping their experience.

    I believe the Europeans are standing on the verge of more effective approach with teaching these people how to cope with the experience limiting drugs to only those who are socially dysfunctional or dangerous to self or others. We alleged "normals" should avoid fitting them all into one convenient box.

    Some cultures in some times see some of these kinds of unusual symptoms as tolerable if not acceptable, some even hold such people in esteem.
    Last edited by Paul Shunamon; 08-05-2017 at 07:28 AM.

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