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Thread: Do you think there is an incomparable cohesiveness that celts have?

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    Do you think there is an incomparable cohesiveness that celts have?

    Do you think there is a camaraderie that celts share with each other that other ethno-linguistic groups, namely Germanics, will never have nor understand? I feel like because of the closer proximity between the celtic nations and the smaller populations the closer the bonds have been able to forge. We're all bound by our dislike of the English too, which also draws us closer together.

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    Nope.

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    Although I do not have any recent emigrants from the British Isles in my family tree, I have perhaps the misperception that the Irish see themselves as distinct from the Scots and Britain in general. Being a smaller island in the most W. Atlantic extremity and prone to discrimination in American upon their mid-1800s immigration, I don't have the perception that their Celtic Scottish brethren rushed to their rescue when "Irish need not apply" signs dotted American business fronts.

    Today in America, you can find ethnic Scottish celebrations in the Highlands games and Irish celebrations in St. Patrick's Day parades and festivities. However, different timelines in immigration may factor into perceived divisions on this side of the pond as Scots tended to emigrate earlier than Irish. OTOH, British - Irish Europeans on the other side of the pond may have an entirely different perception on the matter.

    Also, I find it a bit ironic in a genetic comeuppance sort of way that the Irish look more "Nordic" & Steppe ancestry (supposed IE AC for Europeans) than the English in current DNA studies. Maybe the English need not apply in the Celtic Tiger economy.

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    Well, although I've got ancestors from Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, I don't see myself as a "Celt". However, I have spent years studying Scottish Gaelic, and I got to know many "Real Celts" through that. (Few Welsh speakers, many Scottish and or Irish Gaelic speakers). I went into this as I think many North Americans do, assuming there is some kind of "Celtic" identity. It really surprised me when I learned how individualistic the Gaels I met were. They would consider themselves to be almost a different breed because they were from a different Hebridean island, for example. One woman from South Uist would not speak Gaelic to another from Harris, because of their regional differences. There didn't seem to be a common dislike or hatred of the English, and if my memory serves me correctly, the English didn't ever come up in conversation. Some of them who were more passionate about the preservation of the Gaelic languages would claim there is some comradery between them and the Gaelic speaking Irish, but would still see themselves as different. It really wasn't what I expected to find, but it was a marvelously interesting experience nonetheless.

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    I comment as someone with both English and Welsh ancestry, so I'm not taking sides in that sense.
    I do think in the modern day there is a sort of affinity between Celtic Countries part of which may be a sense of "common cause" against the English for historic reasons, which may range from simple sporting rivalries to downright dislike or even stronger feelings amongst some. I do think though that this has diminished within Wales in recent times, apart from sporting rivalries. There are also linguistic and cultural similarities.
    On the other hand that is a bit simplistic because there are also class (the wealthy oppressing the poor) and even regional rivalries within the UK. Despite that I would say for the most part there is a bond within the UK which took us through two World Wars and other conflicts and trials, although maybe in modern times that bond doesn't seem to be as strong as it used to be.
    Just based on my own experience in Wales, we are still "tribal" in outlook to a considerable extent I think. In the past we were quite happy to fight each other if no-one else was available.

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    I comment as someone with both English and Welsh ancestry, so I'm not taking sides in that sense.
    I do think in the modern day there is a sort of affinity between Celtic Countries part of which may be a sense of "common cause" against the English for historic reasons, which may range from simple sporting rivalries to downright dislike or even stronger feelings amongst some. I do think though that this has diminished within Wales in recent times, apart from sporting rivalries. There are also linguistic and cultural similarities.
    On the other hand it is a bit simplistic because there are also class (the wealthy oppressing the poor) and even regional rivalries within the UK. Despite that I would say for the most part there is a bond within the UK which took us through two World Wars and other conflicts and trials, although maybe in modern times that bond doesn't seem to be as strong as it used to be.
    Just based on my own experience in Wales, we are still "tribal" in outlook to a considerable extent I think. In the past we were quite happy to fight each other if no-one else was available.

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