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Thread: Origin of your surname

  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Awale View Post



    That's interesting because it's considered rude by some Somalis here to ask about their clan. Granted, I've noticed that's more the case with the younger generation, some older people don't remotely hesitate to ask.
    Yes they don't outright ask which clan you hail from when meeting for the first time but they will ask which region you hail from and they can kinda guess where you're from.

    So as someone from Gabiley which is 90% of a certain sub clan a knowledgeable person could easily assume what clan I come from without directly asking.

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  3. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by drobbah View Post
    Yes they don't outright ask which clan you hail from when meeting for the first time but they will ask which region you hail from and they can kinda guess where you're from.

    So as someone from Gabiley which is 90% of a certain sub clan a knowledgeable person could easily assume what clan I come from without directly asking.
    Yep, I've seen this myself. They'll ask me where I'm from in Somalia and when I say where; it becomes kinda obvious that they know my clan. Sometimes they ask who my parents are (they're somewhat well known, particularly in this neck of the woods among the older crowd) and when they know who they are; no further questions are required about my origins.

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  5. #143
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    My last name is from the ancestral home of my maternal grandmothers clan - due to matrilineal descent traditions of my caste which have largely been phased out.

    This family/clan once owned 37,000 acres of land (recorded by a Western historian) and lost almost all of it due to a communist uprising which forcibly removed land from the zamindar class in the state - though democratically elected

    I think Pakistan is the only country where zamindars still enjoy privileges

    First name is from the younger brother of Ramchandra and the ancient emperor King of India who the country is officially named after

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  7. #144
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    Arundale

    Habitational name from a place in West Sussex, seat of the Dukes of Norfolk, named Arundel, from Old English harhune ‘horehound’ (a plant) + dell ‘valley’. (of Norman origin): nickname for someone supposedly resembling a swallow, from Old French arondel, diminutive of arond ‘swallow’ (Latin hirundo, confused with (h)arundo ‘reed’)

    This ancient and distinguished surname, having long associations with the south-western English counties of Cornwall, Dorset and Somerset, and with Yorkshire in the north, has two distinct possible sources, each with its own history and derivation. Firstly, Arundel may be of Norman-French origin, introduced by the Normans in the wake of the Conquest of 1066, and a nickname for someone thought to resemble a swallow, from the Old French "(h)arondel", a diminutive of "arond", swallow. The surname from this source has the distinction of being first recorded in the Domesday Book (see below), and further early examples include: Robert Arundel (Dorset, 1130), and Osbert Arundel, Harundel (Yorkshire, 1154). The Domesday tenant-in-chief has left his name in Sampford Arundel (Somerset) which he held in 1086. Arundel may also be of Anglo-Saxon origin, and a locational name from a Sussex parish thus called, recorded as "Harundel" in the Domesday Book, and so named from the Olde English pre 7th Century "harhun-dell", valley of the hoarhound flower. Early locational surnames include: John de Arundell (Cornwall, 1292), and Robert de Arundell (Sussex, 1332). The three principal Cornish families of the name settled there from the early 13th Century, belong to Lanherne, Trerice and Menadarva. The name has also been continuously associated with the Munster county of Cork since the end of the 13th Century when Robert de Arundel was coroner of Ibawn. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Rogerius Arundel or Harundel, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Dorset and Somerset, during the reign of King William 1, known as "William the Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

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  9. #145
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    My surname is one of the oldest recorded Italian surnames meaning "curly" and "hedgehog" at the same time. First attested people to wear it date to 10th century Tuscany (Fiesole) and in Naples subsequently from the 11th century onwards.

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  11. #146
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    My surname is Milam. While reading court records about my oldest known ancestor in the Colony of Virginia during the mid 1700s, I found it spelled Mylam, Mylum, Milam, Milum, Millam, Millim and Mileham since in that time Clerk of Courts spelled names phonetically. In one long court record, it was spelled three different ways: most frequently Mileham but also Milam and Millam. Linguists agree that Mileham is Anglo-Saxon; apparently most names ending in "ham" are. There was, and is, a village in Norfolk County, England, named Mileham. Many "Milam" English believe their surname is connected with that village.

    My surname project has tested 21 "Milam" men from Great Britain. What is most interesting to me is that they represent 6 genetically distinct families. There is no correlation of their haplogroup with the surname spelling nor with the county of origin of their oldest know ancestor as you can see from this screen shot of our YDNA results:

    Haplogroups of English_2.jpg

    It's frustrating that none of the Englishmen thus far tested match the Haplogroups of any American Milam tested.
    Last edited by Celt_??; 01-19-2018 at 01:59 AM.
    FTDNA Big-Y SNP Results: R1b-U152+, L2+, Z367+, Z384+, L20+, CTS9733+, BY34096+

    Milam / Mileham / Milum Y-DNA Surname Project
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    My Avatar is an image of my family history website's home page: Hidden Content
    An history of Thomas Milam (1738) and his 6 sons as found in Virginia court records from 1738 - 1820.

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  13. #147
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    Not my personal surname, but one the favorites in my tree is Devilbiss.

    As to the spelling of the family name, Devilbiss appears to be a direct translation of the German
    Teuffelbess. Teuffel = Devil and Teuffelbiss translates as Devil’s bite. Sabine Schleichert
    stated this could mean “One who is bold enough to bite the devil, a person who has a devil-maycare
    attitude, or one who has been bitten by the devil.
    Source: http://nebula.wsimg.com/e3ff7c8bcc2d...&alloworigin=1
    Paternal Line: Rhineland Germany (J2-Z387) - Confirmed
    Maternal Grandfather - (Škofja Loka, Slovenia) - R1a1 - Y2613 - Confirmed
    Paternal G-Grandfather - Germany - R1b - U106 - Confirmed
    Maternal G-Grandfather - Briano, Caserta, Italy - Possible R1b - L51

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  15. #148
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    French

  16. #149
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    Viau, from the Latin name Vitalis. Saint Vitalis was a benedictine monk from what some historians think was Wales or England who came to Brittany in the 8'th century. His followers eventually adopted the name which morphed from Vitalis to Vital to Vial and eventually its current French form, Viau. Citizens of the town of Saint-Viaud in Brittany are called "Vitaliens". The name means "lively" or "full of life".

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  18. #150
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